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Al Jackson, 83, 1960s MLB pitcher; an original NY Met
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That Derek
2019-08-20 14:25:55 UTC
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https://nypost.com/2019/08/19/al-jackson-an-original-met-dead-at-83/

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Al Jackson, an original Met, dead at 83

By Mike Puma

August 19, 2019 | 5:00pm | Updated

Al Jackson was remembered Monday for his fierce competitiveness on the mound and affable nature away from it.

The former Mets pitcher and longtime instructor within the organization died at age 83 after a long illness. Jackson had spent recent years in a nursing home in Port St. Lucie, Fla., dealing
with complications from a stroke.

Jackson, a left-hander, went 67-99 with a 3.98 ERA in 10 major league seasons. He was an original Met in 1962 and spent five seasons with the club before he was traded to the Cardinals as part of a deal for Ken Boyer.

Jackson returned to the Mets in a trade following the 1967 season. But Jackson was sold to the Reds early in the ’69 season and missed out on the Mets’ historic ride to a World Series title. Jackson started his career with the Pirates in 1959.

“He was always a happy-go-lucky guy and a great athlete,” said Ed Kranepool, a former teammate of Jackson’s with the Mets. “He could throw strikes and he was a very good competitor.”

Following his playing career, Jackson served the Mets in a variety of roles, including as a coach with the major league team. He had become a mainstay at spring training.

“He was an asset to the organization because he eventually moved to Port St. Lucie and worked in the Mets’ minor leagues and with the kids who lived there,” Kranepool said.

The Mets said in a statement: “It would be impossible to calculate the number of players and staff he touched and influenced during his career.”

Mickey Callaway tried to downplay his first series against the Indians since leaving the organization before last season to manage the Mets. Callaway spent five years as Indians pitching coach, including 2016 when the team went to Game 7 of the World Series against the Cubs. His former boss, Terry Francona, is still in the Indians dugout.

“Hopefully I can help out some of the pitchers with how to attack some of their hitters,” Callaway said. “That is about it.”

The Mets released their 2020 spring training schedule, which begins on Feb. 22 with a split-squad game. The Mets will host the Marlins that day and send the other half of the squad to Jupiter, Fla., to play the Cardinals. The Mets’ Grapefruit League season is scheduled to conclude March 22 at home against the Marlins.
Alfalfa Bill
2019-08-21 01:47:32 UTC
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Post by That Derek
https://nypost.com/2019/08/19/al-jackson-an-original-met-dead-at-83/
Sports
Al Jackson, an original Met, dead at 83
By Mike Puma
August 19, 2019 | 5:00pm | Updated
Al Jackson was remembered Monday for his fierce competitiveness on the mound and affable nature away from it.
The former Mets pitcher and longtime instructor within the organization died at age 83 after a long illness. Jackson had spent recent years in a nursing home in Port St. Lucie, Fla., dealing
with complications from a stroke.
Jackson, a left-hander, went 67-99 with a 3.98 ERA in 10 major league seasons. He was an original Met in 1962 and spent five seasons with the club before he was traded to the Cardinals as part of a deal for Ken Boyer.
Jackson returned to the Mets in a trade following the 1967 season. But Jackson was sold to the Reds early in the ’69 season and missed out on the Mets’ historic ride to a World Series title. Jackson started his career with the Pirates in 1959.
“He was always a happy-go-lucky guy and a great athlete,” said Ed Kranepool, a former teammate of Jackson’s with the Mets. “He could throw strikes and he was a very good competitor.”
Following his playing career, Jackson served the Mets in a variety of roles, including as a coach with the major league team. He had become a mainstay at spring training.
“He was an asset to the organization because he eventually moved to Port St. Lucie and worked in the Mets’ minor leagues and with the kids who lived there,” Kranepool said.
The Mets said in a statement: “It would be impossible to calculate the number of players and staff he touched and influenced during his career.”
Mickey Callaway tried to downplay his first series against the Indians since leaving the organization before last season to manage the Mets. Callaway spent five years as Indians pitching coach, including 2016 when the team went to Game 7 of the World Series against the Cubs. His former boss, Terry Francona, is still in the Indians dugout.
“Hopefully I can help out some of the pitchers with how to attack some of their hitters,” Callaway said. “That is about it.”
The Mets released their 2020 spring training schedule, which begins on Feb. 22 with a split-squad game. The Mets will host the Marlins that day and send the other half of the squad to Jupiter, Fla., to play the Cardinals. The Mets’ Grapefruit League season is scheduled to conclude March 22 at home against the Marlins.
How many of the original 1962 Mets are currently off-topic?
Michael OConnor
2019-08-21 02:41:49 UTC
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Post by Alfalfa Bill
How many of the original 1962 Mets are currently off-topic?
As best as I can tell, the total of living members of the 1962 Mets is 19. That sounds like a lot, but you have to remember as a first-year expansion team, in particular a very, very bad first year expansion team of Biblical proportions, they went thru an abnormally large number of players. In total, 46 players saw time on the roster of the 1962 Mets team.

Here is a list of the living players:

Dave Hillman
Roger Craig
Joe Pignatano
Frank Thomas
Hobie Landrith
Jim Marshall
Sammy Taylor
Ray Daviault
Willard Hunter
Ken MacKenzie
Felix Mantilla
Joe Christopher
John DeMerit
Bob Miller
Galen Cisco
Cliff Cook
Rick Herrscher
Jay Hook
Craig Anderson

The most famous player on the list is Roger Craig, who is best known for being a pitching coach in the 1980's who popularized the split-finger curve pitch. Frank Thomas, needless to say, was not The Big Hurt, but another player with the same name.
Rick B.
2019-08-21 10:48:46 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
Post by Alfalfa Bill
How many of the original 1962 Mets are currently off-topic?
As best as I can tell, the total of living members of the 1962 Mets is
19. That sounds like a lot, but you have to remember as a first-year
expansion team, in particular a very, very bad first year expansion team
of Biblical proportions, they went thru an abnormally large number of
players. In total, 46 players saw time on the roster of the 1962 Mets
team.
Dave Hillman
Roger Craig
Joe Pignatano
Frank Thomas
Hobie Landrith
Jim Marshall
Sammy Taylor
Ray Daviault
Willard Hunter
Ken MacKenzie
Felix Mantilla
Joe Christopher
John DeMerit
Bob Miller
Galen Cisco
Cliff Cook
Rick Herrscher
Jay Hook
Craig Anderson
The most famous player on the list is Roger Craig, who is best known for
being a pitching coach in the 1980's who popularized the split-finger
curve pitch. Frank Thomas, needless to say, was not The Big Hurt, but
another player with the same name.
Also note that the '62 Mets had two pitchers named Bob Miller. Robert G.
Miller is the survivor, Robert L. Miller went on-topic in 1993.
Michael OConnor
2019-08-21 12:44:34 UTC
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Post by Rick B.
Also note that the '62 Mets had two pitchers named Bob Miller. Robert G.
Miller is the survivor, Robert L. Miller went on-topic in 1993.
Robert L. Miller played for 11 different teams in his career, which was a record until it was broken by Mike Morgan and a couple other guys. Octavio Dotel broke the mark earlier this season when he played for thirteen different teams in his career.
m***@gmail.com
2019-08-21 03:59:30 UTC
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Post by That Derek
https://nypost.com/2019/08/19/al-jackson-an-original-met-dead-at-83/
Sports
Al Jackson, an original Met, dead at 83
<snip>

I saw the Mets play in 1962 and 1963 at the Polo Grounds. Al Jackson pitched both games and he won. Hard to believe that I actually saw two Mets victories during those horrible seasons.
That Derek
2019-08-21 14:12:03 UTC
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Post by Rick B.
'62 Mets had two pitchers named Bob Miller. Robert G.
Wasn't one of them a left-hander and the other a right-hander? And weren't they delineated in box scores as "Bob Miller-L" and "Bob Miller-R"?
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