Discussion:
Carl Reiner, 98, comedy writer/producer/dirrctor/actor
(too old to reply)
That Derek
2020-06-30 13:43:06 UTC
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https://www.tmz.com/2020/06/30/carl-reiner-dead-dies-98-dick-van-dyke-show/

Carl Reiner Dead at 98

6/30/2020 6:01 AM PT

Carl Reiner, one of the most prolific entertainers in the history of show business has died ... TMZ has learned.

We're told Reiner died Monday night at his Beverly Hills home. We're told his family was with him when he passed.

Reiner was a producer. He was also a director. He was also an actor. He was also a Grammy winner. He won 9 Emmys in over 7 decades. He has more than 400 credits.

Where to begin? Well, for all you youngins' ... you may have caught Carl in "Toy Story 4."

For most people ... they remember Carl best for "The Dick Van Dyke Show," which he created and starred in. Carl played the role of a very temperamental comedian -- Alan Brady -- who terrorized Dick Van Dyke's character and the other writers. Oh, and there was this new actress Carl cast for Dick's wife -- Mary Tyler Moore.



Carl made a best-selling album with Mel Brooks called "2000 Years with Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks" which earned a Grammy nomination and sparked his writing career.

There were other smash hits, including directing "Oh God" with George Burns and "The Jerk" with Steve Martin. He worked with Martin on several movies, including "Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid," "Man with Two Brains" and "All of Me."

Reiner appeared in a bunch of TV shows and movies, including "The Russians are Coming, The Russians are Coming," and "Enter Laughing."

The directing credits are endless -- "Summer Rental" with John Candy, "Summer School" with Mark Harmon, "That Old Feeling" with Bette Midler and "Sibling Rivalry" with Kirstie Alley and Carrie Fisher.

Carl appeared on lots of hit TV shows, including "Two and a Half Men," "Hot in Cleveland" and "House." He was also in "Ocean's 11" and "Ocean's Thirteen."

We last talked to him in 2013, leaving "Jimmy Kimmel Live."



Reiner received the prestigious Mark Twain Prize for American Humor back in 2000.

Did we mention one of his three kids is Rob Reiner? Definitely like father like son.

Carl's wife, Estelle, whom he married in 1943, died in 2008.

Carl was 98.

RIP

https://variety.com/2020/biz/news/carl-reiner-dead-died-dick-van-dyke-1234694208/

Home Biz

Jun 30, 2020 6:27am PT

Carl Reiner, Comedy Legend and ‘Dick Van Dyke Show’ Creator, Dies at 98

by Carmel Dagan

Carl Reiner, the writer, producer, director and actor who was part of Sid Caesar’s legendary team and went on to create “The Dick Van Dyke Show” and direct several hit films, has died. He was 98.

He died of natural causes on Monday night at his home in Beverly Hills, his assistant Judy Nagy confirmed to Variety.

Reiner, the father of filmmaker and activist Rob Reiner, was the winner of nine Emmy awards, including five for “The Dick Van Dyke Show.” His most popular films as a director included “Oh God,” starring George Burns, in 1977; “The Jerk,” with Steve Martin, in 1979; and “All of Me,” with Martin and Lily Tomlin, in 1984.

Reiner remained in the public eye well into his 80s and 90s with roles in the popular “Ocean’s Eleven” trio of films and on TV with recurring roles on sitcoms “Two and a Half Men” and “Hot in Cleveland.” He also did voice work for shows including “Family Guy,” “American Dad,” “King of the Hill,” and “Bob’s Burgers.”

He first came to prominence as a regular cast member of Sid Caesar’s “Your Show of Shows,” for which he won two Emmys in 1956 and 1957 in the supporting category. He met Mel Brooks during his time with Caesar. The two went on to have a long-running friendship and comedy partnership through the recurring “2000 Year Old Man” sketches.

Before creating CBS hit “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” on which he sometimes appeared, Reiner and “Show of Shows” writer Mel Brooks worked up an elongated skit in which Reiner played straight man-interviewer to Brooks’ “2000 Year Old Man”; a 1961 recording of the skit was an immediate hit and spawned several sequels, the last of which, 1998’s “The 2000 Year Old Man in the Year 2000,” won the pair a Grammy.

Producer-director Max Liebman, who cast him in the 1950 Broadway show “Alive and Kicking,” also hired Reiner as the emcee and a performer on NBC’s comedy/variety program “Your Show of Shows.”

Reiner then freelanced as a panel show emcee on “Keep Talking,” as a TV guest star and in featured film roles in “The Gazebo,” “Happy Anniversary” and “It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World.” Reiner’s 1958 novel “Enter Laughing,” loosely based on his own experiences, was optioned for the stage by producer David Merrick. Reiner did a legit adaptation in 1963 and then directed the film version in 1967, marking his motion picture directing debut.

For Broadway he wrote and directed the farce “Something Different,” which ran for a few months in 1967-68; helmed “Tough to Get Help” in 1972; penned the book for the musical “So Long, 174th Street,” which had a very brief run in 1976; and directed “The Roast” in 1980.

In 1961 Reiner drew on his experiences with Caesar to create and produced “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” a ratings cornerstone for CBS for the next five years. Reiner made guest appearances as the irascible variety show host Alan Brady. The show won Emmys for writing its first three years and for producing its last two. In 1967, Reiner picked up another Emmy for his writing in a reunion variety show with Caesar, Coca and Morris.

Though the “Enter Laughing” movie was modestly received, Reiner continued to direct steadily over the next few decades. “Where’s Poppa?,” an offbeat comedy he directed in 1970, became a cult favorite. Similarly, two other Martin vehicles, the gumshoe spoof “Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid” and “The Man With Two Brains,” found bigger audiences after their release in theaters.

There were also several less-than-successful films, such as 1969’s “The Comic,” to which Reiner also contributed some of the script; two similarly titled mid-’80s misfires, “Summer Rental” and “Summer School”; “Bert Rigby, You’re a Fool”; 1990’s “Sibling Rivalry”; and a 1993 spoof of “Basic Instinct” called “Fatal Instinct.” He also appeared in most of these pics.

While the last film he directed was the 1997 romantic comedy “That Old Feeling,” starring Bette Midler and Dennis Farina, Reiner was an active presence in guest roles on television and in supporting roles in films during the 1990s and 2000s, even as he neared and then surpassed his 90th birthday.

He guested on “Frasier” in 1993; reprised the role of Alan Brady on an episode of “Mad About You” in 1995 and won an Emmy for it; and guested on “Ally McBeal,” “Boston Legal” and “House.”

Bigscreen appearances included 1990’s “The Spirit of ’76,” directed by his son Lucas; “Slums of Beverly Hills” (1998); and all three films in the “Ocean’s Eleven” series.

Born in the Bronx, he graduated from high school at 16 and worked as a machinist while studying acting. After brief stints in summer stock and on the Borscht Belt circuit, he entered the Army during WWII. His acting talents brought him to the attention of Maurice Evans’ special services unit, where Reiner first met future “Show of Shows” cohort Howard Morris. For the remainder of the war he toured South Pacific bases in G.I. revues.

He hit the ground running in New York after the war, landing a part in G.I. revue “Call Me Mister” and in 1948 appeared in the Broadway musical revue “Inside U.S.A.,” starring Beatrice Lillie and Jack Haley. Concurrently he was appearing on television as a fashion photographer in ABC’s “Fashion Story.”

In 1995 Reiner received the Writers Guild’s Laurel Award, a lifetime achievement award for a career in TV writing. In 2000 he won the Mark Twain Prize for Humor, presented by the Kennedy Center. In 2009 he was presented with the WGA’s Valentine Davies Award, recognizing both his writing legacy and valued service to the guild, the entertainment industry and community at large.

Reiner’s wife Estelle, to whom he had been married since 1943, died in 2008. In addition to Rob Reiner, survivors include his daughter Sylvia Anne and son Lucas.
d***@gmail.com
2020-06-30 14:20:16 UTC
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What a crew, THAT DEREK !

You beat major new networks to the punch.

I feel for Rob Reiner today. Great father! Great loss 😢
That Derek
2020-06-30 15:14:33 UTC
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Hey! It's the last day of the month and Carl Reiner is definitely free look-up-worthy from the paywall-happy New York Times

https://www.nytimes.com/2020/06/30/arts/television/carl-reiner-dead.html

BREAKING

Carl Reiner, Multifaceted Master of Comedy, Is Dead at 98

Mr. Reiner was a gifted comic actor, but he spent most of his career slightly out of the spotlight — writing, directing and letting others get the laughs.

By Robert Berkvist and Peter Keepnews

June 30, 2020
Updated 10:38 a.m. ET

Carl Reiner, who as performer, writer and director earned a place in comedy history several times over, died on Monday night at his home in Beverly Hills. He was 98.

His death was confirmed by his daughter, Annie Reiner.

Mr. Reiner first attracted national attention in 1950 as Sid Caesar’s multitalented second banana on the television variety show “Your Show of Shows,” for which he was also a writer. A decade later he created “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” one of the most celebrated situation comedies in television history, and teamed with Mel Brooks on the hugely successful “2000 Year Old Man” records. His novel “Enter Laughing” became both a hit Broadway play and the first of many movies he would direct; among the others were four of Steve Martin’s early starring vehicles.

He won praise as an actor as well, with memorable roles in films like “The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming” and, more recently, “Ocean’s Eleven” and its sequels. But he spent most of his career just slightly out of the spotlight, letting others get the laughs.

His contributions were recognized by his peers, by comedy aficionados and, in 2000, by the Kennedy Center, which awarded him the Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. He was the third recipient, after Richard Pryor and Jonathan Winters.

In his performances with Mr. Brooks and before that with Mr. Caesar, Mr. Reiner specialized in portraying the voice of sanity, a calm presence in a chaotic universe. But despite his claim to the contrary, he was never “just the straight man.”

“He was a comedian himself, and he truly understood and still understands comedy,” Mr. Caesar said of Mr. Reiner in his book “Caesar’s Hours” (2003), written with Eddy Friedfeld. “Most people still don’t realize the importance of a straight man in comedy, or how difficult that role is. Carl had to make his timing my timing.”

Mr. Reiner was, Mr. Caesar added, “the best straight man I’ve ever worked with.”

As part of a stellar supporting cast that also included Imogene Coca and Howard Morris, Mr. Reiner proved his versatility week after week on “Your Show of Shows,” which ran from 1950 to 1954 on NBC and established the template for sketch comedy on television. He played everything from a harried commuter to a frenzied rock ’n’ roller to an unctuous quiz-show host. But he is probably best remembered as an interviewer, solemnly posing questions to a mad professor, a spaced-out jazz musician or some other over-the-top character played by Mr. Caesar, and adding to the humor simply by being serious.

Mr. Reiner contributed behind the scenes as well. He took part in the frenzied writing sessions that shaped the show, bouncing jokes off the walls of the writers’ room with the likes of Mr. Brooks and Neil Simon.

“I became a writer because of that room,” he recalled. “I’d say something and somebody would yell: ‘What do you know? You’re not a writer.’ So I became a writer.”

He characterized his later career moves with similar self-effacing humor in an NPR interview: “I acted like a director. I acted like a producer. I sat in front of a typewriter and acted like a novelist.”

Mr. Reiner’s association with Mr. Caesar encompassed three different series: After “Your Show of Shows” the two worked together on “Caesar’s Hour,” which had a three-year run on NBC, and “Sid Caesar Invites You,” a failed attempt to recapture the “Show of Shows” spirit that lasted less than one season on ABC in 1958.
The Party Piece

The next phase of Mr. Reiner’s career found him again in the role of deadpan interviewer. This time the interviewee was Mr. Brooks.

“The 2000 Year Old Man” began as an act Mr. Reiner and Mr. Brooks performed for friends at parties. When they put in on record, it became a phenomenon. There were ultimately five “2000 Year Old Man” albums, one of which won a Grammy and all of which are treasured by comedians and comedy fans.

Mr. Brooks was the star of the largely improvised routines, reflecting on what it was like to be two millenniums old (none of his thousands of children ever visited) and reminiscing about historical figures like Sigmund Freud (“He was a good basketball player; very few people know that”) and Shakespeare (“He had the worst penmanship I ever saw in my life”). But it was Mr. Reiner who came up with the questions that lit Mr. Brooks’s comedic fuse.

Indeed, it was Mr. Reiner who spontaneously started the ball rolling one day during a quiet moment in the Caesar writers’ room. “I turned to Mel and I said, ‘Here’s a man who was actually seen at the crucifixion 2,000 years ago,’” he told The New York Times in 2009, “and his first words were ‘Oh, boy.’”

“I always knew if I threw a question to Mel he could come up with something,” Mr. Reiner said. “I learned a long time ago that if you can corner a genius comedy brain in panic, you’re going to get something extraordinary.”

As Mr. Brooks put it, “I would dig myself into a hole, and Carl would not let me climb out.”

In 1960, the same year he and Mr. Brooks made their first album, Mr. Reiner wrote and starred in a pilot for a TV series, based on his own life, about a writer who works in New York for a larger-than-life, difficult-to-please comedian.

The show, “Head of the Family,” was not picked up. It became a series only when it was recast with Dick Van Dyke as the central character.

The workplace scenes in “The Dick Van Dyke Show” — featuring Morey Amsterdam and Rose Marie as Mr. Van Dyke’s fellow writers, with Mr. Reiner making occasional appearances as their boss — were inspired by Mr. Reiner’s time with Sid Caesar (although Mr. Reiner insisted that his character was only partly based on Mr. Caesar). The domestic scenes, with Mary Tyler Moore as Mr. Van Dyke’s wife, were set in New Rochelle, N.Y., where Mr. Reiner lived at the time, and Ms. Moore’s character was modeled on his wife, Estelle. Mr. Reiner later attributed the show’s success to the choice of “somebody with more talent to play me.”

Seen on CBS from 1961 until 1966, “The Dick Van Dyke Show” won a total of 15 Primetime Emmy Awards for its cast and crew, five of them for Mr. Reiner as writer and producer. (He won nine Emmys in his career, including two for his on-camera work on “Caesar’s Hour,” one as a writer on a 1967 special that reunited the “Show of Shows” cast and one for a guest appearance, as Alan Brady, on an episode of the sitcom “Mad About You” in 1995.) It is widely regarded as one of the greatest sitcoms of all time.

Someone else once again played Mr. Reiner, or a character very much like him, on Broadway and in the movies. “Enter Laughing,” his autobiographical novel about a stage-struck delivery boy from the Bronx who decides to become an actor, was published in 1958 and adapted for the stage by Joseph Stein, another former member of the Caesar writing staff. With Alan Arkin in the lead role, it opened in 1963 and ran for more than 400 performances.

When “Enter Laughing” was sold to Hollywood, Mr. Reiner shared screenwriting credit with Mr. Stein for the 1967 film adaptation, starring Reni Santoni. It was Mr. Reiner’s third produced screenplay, after “The Thrill of It All” (1963) and “The Art of Love” (1965). More important, it was the first film he directed.

That same year he made his Broadway debut as a writer and director with “Something Different,” the story of a playwright suffering from writer’s block. It received generally good reviews (Walter Kerr of The New York Times praised Mr. Reiner’s “nifty habit of approaching a gag at high speed, passing it on the outside, and then noticing where it went in the rearview mirror”) and had a respectable three-month run. By that time, however, Mr. Reiner’s focus had shifted westward.

He had already appeared in a number of Hollywood movies by the time he and his family moved to Beverly Hills in the late 1960s, and he would continue to show up onscreen occasionally. But for the next three decades, most of his work in Hollywood was done behind the scenes.
From Actor to Director and Back

Carl Reiner was born in the Bronx on March 20, 1922, to Irving Reiner, a watchmaker, and Bessie (Mathias) Reiner. After graduating from Evander Childs High School in the Bronx, he went to work as a machinist’s helper and seemed headed for a career repairing sewing machines.

Then one day his older brother, Charlie, mentioned seeing a newspaper article about a free acting class being given by the Works Progress Administration, the New Deal jobs agency. Carl tried his hand at acting, found he was good at it, hung up his machinist’s apron and joined a theater troupe. He also acted in summer stock.

During World War II, Mr. Reiner served in an Army entertainment unit that toured American bases in the South Pacific. After his discharge he joined the road company of the musical revue “Call Me Mister” as the comic lead, and within a year he was in the Broadway production.

In the 1949-50 television season he was a regular on “The Fifty-Fourth Street Revue,” a variety series, and in 1950 he was back on Broadway in “Alive and Kicking,” where he caught the eye of Max Liebman, the mastermind of “Your Show of Shows.”

Mr. Reiner married Estelle Lebost in 1943. She died in 2008.

In addition to his daughter, an author and psychoanalyst, he is survived by his sons, Rob, known for directing “When Harry Met Sally,” “A Few Good Men,” “This Is Spinal Tap” and numerous other films and for his role as Archie Bunker’s son-in-law on the groundbreaking sitcom “All in the Family,” and Lucas, a painter and filmmaker; and five grandchildren.

Mr. Reiner’s first major box-office success as a director was “Oh, God!” (1977), starring George Burns as a very down-to-earth deity. Two years later he teamed with Steve Martin, then at the height of his fame as a comedian, for what proved to be a mutually rewarding collaboration.

Mr. Reiner first directed Mr. Martin in “The Jerk” (1979), a film largely inspired by Mr. Martin’s manic stand-up act. The critical response was lukewarm, but the movie was a box-office smash and now often shows up on lists of the best American comedies.
Image

“The Jerk,” “Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid” (1982), “The Man With Two Brains” (1983) and “All of Me” (1984) defined Mr. Martin’s onscreen persona as a lovable goofball and made him a movie star. They also established Mr. Reiner as an imaginative director — especially “Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid,” a black-and-white spoof of film noir set in the 1940s, in which he integrated vintage clips featuring actors like Humphrey Bogart and Barbara Stanwyck into the action.

Mr. Reiner returned to Broadway twice after moving west, but neither visit was triumphant. In 1972 he directed “Tough to Get Help,” a comedy by Steve Gordon about a black couple working in an ostensibly liberal white household, which was savaged by the critics and closed after one performance. In 1980 he staged “The Roast,” by Jerry Belson and Garry Marshall, two writers he had worked with on “The Dick Van Dyke Show.” That play, about a group of comedians who expose their darker instincts when they gather to roast a colleague, ran for less than a week.

The movies he directed after he stopped working with Mr. Martin — among them “Summer Rental” (1985), with John Candy, and “Sibling Rivalry” (1990), with Kirstie Alley and Bill Pullman — did only somewhat better. In his 70s, he decided that filmmaking demanded “just too much energy.” He gave it up after making “That Old Feeling” (1997), with Bette Midler and Dennis Farina.

But he remained active in front of the camera, notably as a crook lured out of retirement by the prospect of sharing in the loot from a Las Vegas casino robbery in Steven Soderbergh’s 2001 remake of the Frank Sinatra caper film “Ocean’s Eleven.” He reprised the role in “Ocean’s Twelve” (2004) and “Ocean’s Thirteen” (2007).

On television he had recurring roles on the sitcoms “Hot in Cleveland” and “Two and a Half Men” and guest-starred on “Parks and Recreation,” “House” and other series. He also did voice-over work for a number of cartoon shows.

Mr. Reiner wrote a number of books in addition to “Enter Laughing,” including novels, children’s books and several memoirs, among them “My Anecdotal Life” (2003), “I Remember Me” (2013) and “Too Busy to Die” (2017). His daughter said another book would be published soon.

In 2017 he was prominently featured in “If You’re Not in the Obit, Eat Breakfast,” a documentary about people who remained active into their 90s. And in his last years he maintained an active Twitter account, which he used primarily for political commentary.

A photo showing Mr. Reiner, Mr. Brooks and Annie Reiner wearing “Black Lives Matter T-shirts” was posted on Twitter this week.

Toward the end of “I Remember Me,” Mr. Reiner said a friend of his had recently asked if he had thought about retiring. Noting that his role on “Hot in Cleveland” gave him “the opportunity to kiss Betty White — thrice — and on the lips,” he offered a succinct response:

“Retire? I may be old, but I am not crazy!”

Derrick Bryson Taylor contributed reporting.
d***@gmail.com
2020-06-30 15:35:23 UTC
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“Mr. Reiner was a gifted comic actor, but he spent most of his career slightly out of the spotlight — writing, directing and letting others get the laughs.”

It seems unfair that he got all the talent. LOL. Oh well. Smart staying “back”. It’s a move I used myself. Who needs a target 🎯??
m***@gmail.com
2020-06-30 16:33:20 UTC
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A Giant.
That Derek
2020-06-30 15:35:07 UTC
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https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/carl-reiner-dead-comedy-legend-720797

TV

CARL REINER, WHO ALWAYS LEFT THEM LAUGHING, DIES AT 98

7:02 AM PDT 6/30/2020
by Mike Barnes

AFTER STARTING OUT WITH SID CAESAR, HE DID THE '2000 YEAR OLD MAN' ROUTINE WITH PAL MEL BROOKS, CREATED 'THE DICK VAN DYKE SHOW' AND DIRECTED SUCH FILMS AS 'THE JERK.'

Carl Reiner, the quintessential straight man for Sid Caesar and Mel Brooks who based the beloved sitcom The Dick Van Dyke Show on his own life and jump-started Steve Martin’s big-screen career, has died, his assistant Judy Nagy confirmed to The Hollywood Reporter. He was 98.

The influential writer, director, actor, author and 12-time Emmy Award winner died Monday night at his Beverly Hills home of natural causes, Nagy said.

Son Rob Reiner, the actor, writer, director and Oscar-nominated producer, said in a tweet Tuesday morning: "Last night my dad passed away. As I write this my heart is hurting. He was my guiding light."
TMZ first reported the news of his death.

Born in the Bronx, Reiner came to prominence in the 1950s as a performer and writer on Caesar’s legendary live variety programs Your Show of Shows and Caesar’s Hour, the wacky live primetime variety shows that also served as career springboards for Brooks, Woody Allen, Larry Gelbart, Neil Simon, Howard Morris, Imogene Coca and others.

From those writers rooms, he and Brooks began a lifelong friendship, and the two birthed one of the great two-man comedy routines of all time, The 2000 Year Old Man. The off-the-wall shtick yielded five comedy albums, TV appearances with Ed Sullivan and Steve Allen, a 1975 animated television special and a Grammy Award.

“I’d written a novel, Enter Laughing, but I’d never written a situation comedy,” he recalled in a 2011 interview with the WGA West. “And I remember talking to myself … The question I asked myself at Franklin Roosevelt Drive and 96th Street was, ‘Reiner, what piece of ground do you stand on that no one else stands on? Write about that.’

“And I said, ‘Well, I live in [New York City suburb] New Rochelle. I’m married. I have two kids. I work in New York. I’m a writer on a television variety show, Your Show of Shows. Write about that.’ And that’s how Head of the Family, which would become The Dick Van Dyke Show, was born.”

Reiner wrote 13 episodes and then starred opposite Barbara Britton in the pilot, but with the television landscape then dominated by Westerns, every network passed on it. He was not eager to try again a year later, but producer Sheldon Leonard told him, “We’ll get a better actor to play you.”

That, of course, would be Dick Van Dyke, who portrayed the clumsy Rob Petrie. He worked with fellow comedy scribes Sally Rogers (Rose Marie) and Buddy Sorrell (Morey Amsterdam) on the fictional Alan Brady Show, and Mary Tyler Moore, only 24 years old when the show premiered, played his wife, Laurie (Van Dyke was 35).

“Carl Reiner is the best writer in the world,” Van Dyke told David Steinberg on Showtime’s Inside Comedy. “He understood everyone’s way of speaking, the cadence, the intonation, everything. He wrote for everyone the way they talked. I didn’t have to act; all I had to do was read the lines. He was that good.”

In addition to producing the show and writing the first 39 episodes himself — and having a hand in all 158 installments during the life of the series — Reiner appeared occasionally as the toupee-wearing, cavalier comedy star Alan Brady. He once said he based that character not on Caesar but on a composite of Milton Berle, Phil Silvers and Jackie Gleason, guys who rarely deigned to talk to their writers.

In 1959, after Your Show of Shows and Caesar’s Hour, Reiner was being offered sitcom work but didn’t like any of the scripts he was reading. His late wife, Estelle, told him he could write a better one.

The Dick Van Dyke Show aired for five seasons from October 1961 to June 1966 and forged new ground when it aired reruns that first summer (while its tough in-season competition, NBC’s The Perry Como Show, was on hiatus). The revolutionary move attracted viewers who missed the show the first time, and ratings grew for season two.
The series went on to amass 14 Emmys, including five for Reiner.
“Most of the shows [on the air then] were battle of sexes. [I Love] Lucy certainly was a battle of the sexes,” he said in a 1998 interview with the Archive of American Television. “A lot of deception, a lot of people fooling everybody. The Van Dyke show was based on my wife and I. We were worthy adversaries, we argued about things — but we were two against the world.”

Estelle, his wife of nearly 65 years, died in October 2008 at age 94. She was best known for her cameo in their son Rob's 1989 film When Harry Met Sally … when, in a restaurant, she reacts to Meg Ryan’s character, who was faking an orgasm, by saying, “I’ll have what she’s having.”

In addition to Rob, survivors include another son, Lucas, and daughter Annie.

He and Rob participated in a handprint/footprint ceremony outside the TCL Chinese Theatre in April 2017 at the TCM Classic Film Festival.

Carl Reiner was born on March 20, 1922. His father was a watchmaker who worked out of the family’s three-room apartment. After graduating from Evander Childs High School, Reiner was making $8 a week as a machinist when his older brother Charlie told him about a free dramatic workshop in Manhattan sponsored by the Works Progress Administration.

Reiner did plays near Central Park for a dollar a week, and that led to a two-year stint with a summer theater company outside Rochester, New York, where his pay graduated to room and board.

During World War II, Reiner trained as a radio operator in the Air Force and later was assigned to Georgetown University to study French so he could become an interpreter. He served in the Pacific as a comedian and actor with the Special Services Entertainment Unit (run by future Bewitched actor Maurice Evans), which put on plays for the troops.

Reiner spent time after the war honing his chops as a stand-up comedian and MC at a resort in Keene, New Mexico, and was the lead in the national company production of the musical revue Call Me Mister, about men coming home from war.

In 1948, Reiner made his Broadway debut in another musical revue, Inside U.S.A., with Jack Haley, and played a bothersome photographer on an early TV series, The Fashion Story. He joined the live primetime show The Fifty-Fourth Street Revue, which featured dancer Bob Fosse, before hooking up with Caesar on NBC’s Your Show of Shows in 1950. In one of many their popular sketches, Reiner interviewed Caesar’s The Professor, a bluffing German who sounded smart but was in reality a buffoon.

Caesar then took Reiner to his new NBC variety program, Caesar’s Hour, where Reiner starred in such recurring sketches as “The Commuters” as a suburbanite on a crowded train and as one of “The Three Haircuts,” which spoofed the hairstyles of rock ’n’ roll singers.

The 2000 Year Old Man was created as Reiner and Brooks were fooling around during a lull in the writers room at Your Show of Shows.
In the finest straight man tradition laid down by Bud Abbott and George Burns, Reiner played an earnest TV reporter interviewing the bombastic Brooks, who used a Yiddish accent, as the oldest man in the world.

“I turned to Mel and I said, ‘Here’s a man who was actually seen at the crucifixion 2,000 years ago,” and his first words were, ‘Oh, boy.’ We all fell over laughing,” Reiner, in describing the genesis of the routine, told The New York Times in 2009.

“I said, ‘You knew Jesus?’ ‘Yeah,’ he said. ‘Thin lad, wore sandals, long hair, walked around with 11 other guys. Always came into the store, never bought anything. Always asked for water.’ Those were the first words, and then for the next hour or two I kept asking him questions, and he never stopped killing us.”

Reiner and Brooks were asked to bring out the bit for years at parties, and Edward G. Robinson wanted to make a Broadway play out of it. After Burns threatened (probably not jokingly) to steal the routine, Allen rented out studio space for the duo to record an album. The 2000 Year Old Man was a best-seller in 1960.

They gave the record to Cary Grant, who took it to London and played it for the Queen Mother. “She loved it,” the actor told them. Noted Reiner, “Well, there’s the biggest shiksa in the world; we must be all right.”

Reiner stepped out from his straight-man shackles to star in the Norman Jewison comedy The Russians Are Coming, the Russians Are Coming (1966) as the father of a vacationing family in New England.
He also played con man Saul Bloom in Steven Soderbergh’s Oceans Eleven flicks, was on a panel that roasted the insecure late-night host of The Larry Sanders Show, won his final Emmy for portraying “TV legend” Alan Brady on Mad About You and recently appeared as a movie producer on Two and a Half Men.

Behind the camera, Reiner was instrumental in the movie career of Martin, who had been a writer with Rob Reiner on CBS’ The Smothers Brothers Show. He directed the stand-up genius in four films, including his big-screen starring debut, The Jerk (1979), in which Martin’s Navin R. Johnson, who “was born a poor Black child,” leaves his adoptive sharecropper family to find riches (and then rags) in the outside world.

They two also teamed up for Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid (1982) and The Man With Two Brains (1983), both of which they wrote together, and All of Me (1984).

When Reiner was honored in 2011 by the TV Academy, Martin joked in a video, “I really wanted to be there tonight, Carl, but I am across the street having dinner.”

Reiner also directed such features as The Comic (1969), starring Van Dyke as a silent film star; the dark comedy Where’s Poppa? (1970), starring George Segal and Ruth Gordon; Oh, God! (1977), with a script by Gelbart that had Burns playing the Man Upstairs; Summer Rental (1985), starring John Candy; the spoof Fatal Instinct (1993); and That Old Feeling (1997), with Bette Midler and Dennis Farina.
Reiner also penned the film comedies The Thrill of It All (1963), starring James Garner and Doris Day, and The Art of Love (1965) with Garner, Van Dyke and Elke Sommer.

He created two 1970 sitcoms: The New Dick Van Dyke Show, with the actor now playing the host of a TV show in Phoenix, and Lotsa Luck, starring Dom DeLuise as the manager of a bus company’s lost and found department.

In the 1960s, Reiner also served as a frequent game show panelist and host. He presided over The Celebrity Game, where he would ask questions of nine formally dressed guest stars, and the contestants would guess their answers. The show was canceled, but the next year, the producers tweaked the format, stacked the stars in cubicles and renamed it The Hollywood Squares.

Reiner’s 1959 autobiographical novel, Enter Laughing, about a young man trying to break into show business, was adapted by his Show of Shows cohort Joseph Stein into a play that was directed by Gene Saks. It ran for a year on Broadway, and Alan Arkin won a Tony for playing the character based on Reiner.

He and Stein then wrote the Enter Laughing movie (with Reiner making his feature directing debut) that was released in 1967 and starred Reni Santori, José Ferrer and Shelley Winters.

The prolific Reiner also wrote such books as All Kinds of Love, which skewered the California lifestyle; How Paul Robeson Saved My Life, a collection of short stories; Just Desserts: A Novellelah; NNNNN: A Novel; the children’s book Tell Me a Scary Story … But Not Too Scary!; and the memoirs My Anecdotal Life and I Remember Me.
In 2000, Reiner was the recipient of the prestigious Kennedy Center Mark Twain Prize for American Humor. He was the third person ever so honored. Jerry Seinfeld was on hand for the coronation.

“I think Carl Reiner is funnier than Mark Twain,” Seinfeld said. “[Twain is] funny, don’t get me wrong. But what was his best bit?
“I’m sorry, but this guy is not touching Carl Reiner. Twain would be working to type script changes for Carl Reiner. Twain should be so lucky to be here today so he could get the Carl Reiner Prize.”

https://www.theguardian.com/film/2020/jun/30/hollywood-comedy-legend-carl-reiner-dies-aged-98

Movies

HOLLYWOOD COMEDY LEGEND CARL REINER DIES AGED 98

Director of Steve Martin comedies The Jerk and The Man With Two Brains was also famed for his collaboration with Mel Brooks

Andrew Pulver
@Andrew_Pulver
Tue 30 Jun 2020 09.31 EDT

Last modified on Tue 30 Jun 2020 10.49 EDT

Carl Reiner, the veteran comic and film-maker renowned for his double act with Mel Brooks as well as directing a string of hit comedies including The Jerk and The Man With Two Brains, has died 98.

Variety confirmed the news, reporting that his publicist said he died of natural causes on Monday night at his home in Beverly Hills.
His son, film-maker Rob Reiner posted on social media: “Last night my dad passed away. As I write this my heart is hurting. He was my guiding light.”

Along with Brooks, Reiner became an icon of Jewish-American comedy for the pair’s sketch routines, most famously The 2000 Year Old Man which first appeared on record in 1960, and grew out of their work as writers on Sid Caesar’s hit TV comedy Your Show of Shows. Reiner also scored a major TV hit by creating and co-writing The Dick Van Dyke Show, starring the popular entertainer, before going on to achieve renown as the director of Steve Martin’s best known films. Reiner’s son Rob also became an acclaimed film-maker, with such hits as When Harry Met Sally, Stand By Me and This Is Spinal Tap.
The film and TV industry was quick to pay tribute. Alan Alda tweeted: “His talent will live on for a long time, but the loss of his kindness and decency leaves a hole in our hearts”; while William Shatner wrote: “From the writers room of Sid Caesar to recreating those times for the Dick Van Dyke show, Carl was a master at his craft.” Josh Gad added: “Goodbye to one of the greatest comedic minds of all time. Thank you for always making us laugh and for always giving us joy.” Mia Farrow wrote: “We lost a person who gave us great times – countless laughs. He was brilliant. And kind … He was with us through good times and hard times. Thank you Carl Reiner.”

New York governor Andrew Cuomo also tweeted his condolences, writing: “Carl Reiner, Bronx born and bred, made TV comedy that endures to this day. He made America laugh — a true gift. New York extends our condolences to his family and many friends.”

Born in New York in 1922, Reiner was the son of Jewish immigrants to the US, and served in the US air force during the second world war. After joining the service’s performing unit, Reiner broke into showbiz after hostilities finished, landing a spot on Your Show of Shows in 1950, where he would collaborate with the likes of Brooks and Neil Simon. Reiner stayed with Caesar throughout the 1950s, until he developed his own show about a comedy writer, which was given to Van Dyke as a vehicle along with Mary Tyler Moore.

As a result of its success, Reiner moved into feature-film-making: his directorial debut was Enter Laughing in 1967, adapted from his own autobiography about a Jewish kid trying to break into showbusiness. Subsequent films included the George Burns comedy Oh God! and the Henry Winkler wrestling comedy The One and Only.

In what would become a momentous collaboration, Reiner was asked by then-white-hot stage and TV comic Steve Martin to direct his debut film, and the 1979 film The Jerk was the result. After its impressive box office figures, the pair made three more films in a row – Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid (1982), The Man with Two Brains (1983) and All of Me (1984) – all of which were substantial successes.

In subsequent decades, his status as a comedy legend secure he completed numerous guest shots in TV shows such as Frasier, King of the Hill, The Larry Sanders Show and Ally McBeal, while latterday film roles included Steven Soderbergh’s Ocean’s Eleven remake as con artist Saul Bloom and “Carl Reinorcerous” in Toy Story 4.

Reiner was a committed Democrat, and a fervent opponent of President Trump. he remained active on social media, and one of his final posts castigated Trump as “a bankrupted and corrupt businessman who had no qualifications to be the leader of any country in the civilized world”.

In 1943 he married cabaret singer Estelle Lebost, who would become renowned herself for her one-line role in her son’s film When Harry Met Sally: “I’ll have what she’s having.” Lebost died in 2008, and Reiner is survived by three children, Rob, Sylvia and Lucas.
TeddyKGB
2020-06-30 17:03:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by That Derek
https://www.tmz.com/2020/06/30/carl-reiner-dead-dies-98-dick-van-dyke-show/
Carl Reiner Dead at 98
6/30/2020 6:01 AM PT
Carl Reiner, one of the most prolific entertainers in the history of show business has died ... TMZ has learned.
We're told Reiner died Monday night at his Beverly Hills home. We're told his family was with him when he passed.
Reiner was a producer. He was also a director. He was also an actor. He was also a Grammy winner. He won 9 Emmys in over 7 decades. He has more than 400 credits.
Where to begin? Well, for all you youngins' ... you may have caught Carl in "Toy Story 4."
For most people ... they remember Carl best for "The Dick Van Dyke Show," which he created and starred in. Carl played the role of a very temperamental comedian -- Alan Brady -- who terrorized Dick Van Dyke's character and the other writers. Oh, and there was this new actress Carl cast for Dick's wife -- Mary Tyler Moore.
Carl made a best-selling album with Mel Brooks called "2000 Years with Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks" which earned a Grammy nomination and sparked his writing career.
There were other smash hits, including directing "Oh God" with George Burns and "The Jerk" with Steve Martin. He worked with Martin on several movies, including "Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid," "Man with Two Brains" and "All of Me."
Reiner appeared in a bunch of TV shows and movies, including "The Russians are Coming, The Russians are Coming," and "Enter Laughing."
The directing credits are endless -- "Summer Rental" with John Candy, "Summer School" with Mark Harmon, "That Old Feeling" with Bette Midler and "Sibling Rivalry" with Kirstie Alley and Carrie Fisher.
Carl appeared on lots of hit TV shows, including "Two and a Half Men," "Hot in Cleveland" and "House." He was also in "Ocean's 11" and "Ocean's Thirteen."
We last talked to him in 2013, leaving "Jimmy Kimmel Live."
Reiner received the prestigious Mark Twain Prize for American Humor back in 2000.
Did we mention one of his three kids is Rob Reiner? Definitely like father like son.
Carl's wife, Estelle, whom he married in 1943, died in 2008.
Carl was 98.
RIP
https://variety.com/2020/biz/news/carl-reiner-dead-died-dick-van-dyke-1234694208/
Home Biz
Jun 30, 2020 6:27am PT
Carl Reiner, Comedy Legend and ‘Dick Van Dyke Show’ Creator, Dies at 98
by Carmel Dagan
Carl Reiner, the writer, producer, director and actor who was part of Sid Caesar’s legendary team and went on to create “The Dick Van Dyke Show” and direct several hit films, has died. He was 98.
He died of natural causes on Monday night at his home in Beverly Hills, his assistant Judy Nagy confirmed to Variety.
Reiner, the father of filmmaker and activist Rob Reiner, was the winner of nine Emmy awards, including five for “The Dick Van Dyke Show.” His most popular films as a director included “Oh God,” starring George Burns, in 1977; “The Jerk,” with Steve Martin, in 1979; and “All of Me,” with Martin and Lily Tomlin, in 1984.
Reiner remained in the public eye well into his 80s and 90s with roles in the popular “Ocean’s Eleven” trio of films and on TV with recurring roles on sitcoms “Two and a Half Men” and “Hot in Cleveland.” He also did voice work for shows including “Family Guy,” “American Dad,” “King of the Hill,” and “Bob’s Burgers.”
He first came to prominence as a regular cast member of Sid Caesar’s “Your Show of Shows,” for which he won two Emmys in 1956 and 1957 in the supporting category. He met Mel Brooks during his time with Caesar. The two went on to have a long-running friendship and comedy partnership through the recurring “2000 Year Old Man” sketches.
Before creating CBS hit “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” on which he sometimes appeared, Reiner and “Show of Shows” writer Mel Brooks worked up an elongated skit in which Reiner played straight man-interviewer to Brooks’ “2000 Year Old Man”; a 1961 recording of the skit was an immediate hit and spawned several sequels, the last of which, 1998’s “The 2000 Year Old Man in the Year 2000,” won the pair a Grammy.
Producer-director Max Liebman, who cast him in the 1950 Broadway show “Alive and Kicking,” also hired Reiner as the emcee and a performer on NBC’s comedy/variety program “Your Show of Shows.”
Reiner then freelanced as a panel show emcee on “Keep Talking,” as a TV guest star and in featured film roles in “The Gazebo,” “Happy Anniversary” and “It’s a Mad Mad Mad Mad World.” Reiner’s 1958 novel “Enter Laughing,” loosely based on his own experiences, was optioned for the stage by producer David Merrick. Reiner did a legit adaptation in 1963 and then directed the film version in 1967, marking his motion picture directing debut.
For Broadway he wrote and directed the farce “Something Different,” which ran for a few months in 1967-68; helmed “Tough to Get Help” in 1972; penned the book for the musical “So Long, 174th Street,” which had a very brief run in 1976; and directed “The Roast” in 1980.
In 1961 Reiner drew on his experiences with Caesar to create and produced “The Dick Van Dyke Show,” a ratings cornerstone for CBS for the next five years. Reiner made guest appearances as the irascible variety show host Alan Brady. The show won Emmys for writing its first three years and for producing its last two. In 1967, Reiner picked up another Emmy for his writing in a reunion variety show with Caesar, Coca and Morris.
Though the “Enter Laughing” movie was modestly received, Reiner continued to direct steadily over the next few decades. “Where’s Poppa?,” an offbeat comedy he directed in 1970, became a cult favorite. Similarly, two other Martin vehicles, the gumshoe spoof “Dead Men Don’t Wear Plaid” and “The Man With Two Brains,” found bigger audiences after their release in theaters.
There were also several less-than-successful films, such as 1969’s “The Comic,” to which Reiner also contributed some of the script; two similarly titled mid-’80s misfires, “Summer Rental” and “Summer School”; “Bert Rigby, You’re a Fool”; 1990’s “Sibling Rivalry”; and a 1993 spoof of “Basic Instinct” called “Fatal Instinct.” He also appeared in most of these pics.
While the last film he directed was the 1997 romantic comedy “That Old Feeling,” starring Bette Midler and Dennis Farina, Reiner was an active presence in guest roles on television and in supporting roles in films during the 1990s and 2000s, even as he neared and then surpassed his 90th birthday.
He guested on “Frasier” in 1993; reprised the role of Alan Brady on an episode of “Mad About You” in 1995 and won an Emmy for it; and guested on “Ally McBeal,” “Boston Legal” and “House.”
Bigscreen appearances included 1990’s “The Spirit of ’76,” directed by his son Lucas; “Slums of Beverly Hills” (1998); and all three films in the “Ocean’s Eleven” series.
Born in the Bronx, he graduated from high school at 16 and worked as a machinist while studying acting. After brief stints in summer stock and on the Borscht Belt circuit, he entered the Army during WWII. His acting talents brought him to the attention of Maurice Evans’ special services unit, where Reiner first met future “Show of Shows” cohort Howard Morris. For the remainder of the war he toured South Pacific bases in G.I. revues.
He hit the ground running in New York after the war, landing a part in G.I. revue “Call Me Mister” and in 1948 appeared in the Broadway musical revue “Inside U.S.A.,” starring Beatrice Lillie and Jack Haley. Concurrently he was appearing on television as a fashion photographer in ABC’s “Fashion Story.”
In 1995 Reiner received the Writers Guild’s Laurel Award, a lifetime achievement award for a career in TV writing. In 2000 he won the Mark Twain Prize for Humor, presented by the Kennedy Center. In 2009 he was presented with the WGA’s Valentine Davies Award, recognizing both his writing legacy and valued service to the guild, the entertainment industry and community at large.
Reiner’s wife Estelle, to whom he had been married since 1943, died in 2008. In addition to Rob Reiner, survivors include his daughter Sylvia Anne and son Lucas.
One of the longest survivors, but not THE longest, of the Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World cast.
d***@gmail.com
2020-06-30 17:58:42 UTC
Permalink
Can’t forget his wife, Estelle.

His wife had to be something ...
and she was!

Here is six seconds to remind.


d***@gmail.com
2020-06-30 20:56:00 UTC
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I just watched those six seconds,
and I was right.

Mrs Reiner, wife to a great man
and mother to Meathead, was
something else. I can sense a
great mom wife etc. The hand
that rocks the cradle rules the
universe.

Bless them‼️
d***@gmail.com
2020-06-30 21:43:08 UTC
Permalink
Loss of a Legend

Rob Reiner Trubute to Father

http://l.mail.people.com/rts/go2.aspx?h=11360128&tp=i-1NHD-9U-2G2a-dc86Ia-Hv-9XmN9-1c-ROcb-dbwgj8-l4nhxenTwk-I7qsL&x=0c619f28a5ef719b9eb73a607d9a82a71ac2921f%7c538320%7c20200630%7c063020%7c538320%7c36292612056
RH Draney
2020-06-30 19:30:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by TeddyKGB
One of the longest survivors, but not THE longest, of the Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World cast.
One of my first thoughts on seeing the announcement was to check my
list...looks like we're now down to just Barrie Chase and Nicholas
Georgiade....r
Bermuda999
2020-06-30 23:46:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by RH Draney
Post by TeddyKGB
One of the longest survivors, but not THE longest, of the Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World cast.
One of my first thoughts on seeing the announcement was to check my
list...looks like we're now down to just Barrie Chase
Bless her


(I just saw Dick Shawn as guest star on That Girl and he was, as usual, great)
That Derek
2020-07-01 00:32:02 UTC
Permalink
My favorite "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World" trivia question is this:

What two members of a 1930s film comedy team both appear in "Mad World" but not together?

Buster Keaton and Jimmy Durante. Yes, MGM paired them up in three ill-fated films.

Virtually nobody guesses that one.

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