Discussion:
Terry Jones, 77, Welsh-born member, Monty Python
Add Reply
That Derek
2020-01-22 13:19:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/terry-jones-dead-monty-python-founder-british-comedy-icon-was-77-963478

TV

Terry Jones, 'Monty Python' Co-Founder and British Comedy Icon, Dies at 77

4:49 AM PST 1/22/2020
by Alex Ritman

Jones' son was in tears as he read a speech on behalf of the legendary Monty Python member.

Just over a week since he revealed that he was suffering from a form of dementia, Terry Jones, a founding member of legendary British comedy troupe Monty Python, made his first public appearance Sunday at a Welsh BAFTA event.

Jones' son Bill Jones was on hand to help his 74-year-old father to the stage to collect an award acknowledging his 50 years of contribution to film and TV, breaking down in tears as he read a speech on his dad's behalf.

"We would like to thank everyone. I know it's a great honor for dad to win this award," he said after the pair were given a standing ovation. "The struggles we've been going through ... we are so proud of him."

Fellow Python Michael Palin had earlier introduced his comedy collaborator as a someone who has been "relentlessly prolific while being a wonderful friend."

"The first sketch we performed was as a pair of police officers at the Edinburgh festival, and for the next few years we were inseparable," he said, adding that "life seemed more exciting when Terry was around."

On Sep. 23, it was revealed that Jones had been diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia, which erodes the ability to use language.
That Derek
2020-01-22 13:38:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/terry-jones-dead-monty-python-founder-british-comedy-icon-was-77-963478

TV

Terry Jones, 'Monty Python' Co-Founder and British Comedy Icon, Dies at 77

4:49 AM PST 1/22/2020
by Alex Ritman

The beloved actor, screenwriter, director, author and historian was known as the famed troupe's underrated but passionate heart.

Terry Jones, a founding member of Monty Python and a beloved comedian, screenwriter, film director, poet, historian and author, has died. He was 77.

His agent confirmed his death to the BBC. He had been suffering from dementia, which was revealed publicly by his son, Bill, in September 2016. It left him unable to speak.

"We are deeply saddened to have to announce the passing of beloved husband and father, Terry Jones," his family said in a statement.

"Terry passed away on the evening of 21 January 2020 at the age of 77 with his wife Anna Soderstrom by his side after a long, extremely brave but always good humoured battle with a rare form of dementia, FTD.

"Over the past few days his wife, children, extended family and many close friends have been constantly with Terry as he gently slipped away at his home in North London. We have all lost a kind, funny, warm, creative and truly loving man whose uncompromising individuality, relentless intellect and extraordinary humour has given pleasure to countless millions across six decades."

Renowned for his depictions of middle-aged housewives, often with hysterically falsetto voices, it was Jones who would famously scream the iconic line, "He's not the Messiah, he's a very naughty boy," while playing mother to the titular not-quite-son-of-god in 1979 comedy Monty Python's Life of Brian, which he also directed. The line twice was voted the funniest in film history in U.K. polls.

Although rarely receiving the same acclaim as Monty Python's other members, Jones also was widely regarded within the group as its underrated but passionate heart, known for his good-natured enthusiasm and a deep well of intelligence across a broad range of subjects.

A biographer once commented that should you speak to Jones "on subjects as diverse as fossil fuels, or Rupert Bear, or mercenaries in the Middle Ages or Modern China … in a moment you will find yourself hopelessly out of your depth, floored by his knowledge."

Born in North Wales, Jones read English at Oxford University, where he met his long-term collaborator and friend, Michael Palin. The two would star together in the college's comedy troupe The Oxford Revue, and after graduation, they appeared in the 1967 TV sketch comedy Twice a Fortnight.

Two years later, they created The Complete and Utter History of Britain, which featured comedy sketches from history as if TV had been around at the time. It was on the show Do Not Adjust Your Set where they would be introduced to fellow comic Eric Idle, who had starred alongside John Cleese and Graham Chapman in productions mounted by the Cambridge University theatrical club the Footlights.

The five — together with Terry Gilliam, whom Cleese had met in New York — would quickly pool their talents for a new show. Monty Python's Flying Circus was born and ran on the BBC for four seasons between 1969-74, with Jones driving much of the show's early innovation.

Among his most famous performances in the series was as an inept, bumbling cardinal in the Spanish Inquisition (seen wearing a leather WWI pilot's hat and goggles); a member of the Hell's Grannies, a marauding group of old women terrorizing the streets of London; an overly apologetic French waiter in a sketch involving a dirty fork; a Yorkshireman who had to "get up out of the shoebox in the middle of the night and lick the road clean with our tongues;" and as a nude piano player with an erratic face in scenes often used to break up sketches.

After the TV show ended, Jones co-directed with Gilliam the troupe's first big-screen outing, Monty Python and the Holy Grail (1975), in which Jones also played, among a bevy of roles, Sir Bedevere the Wise, Prince Herbert ("Father, I just want to sing!") and a member of the dreaded Knights who say "Ni."

For Life of Brian (1979) and Monty Python's The Meaning of Life (1983), Jones took on sole directing duties, having amicably agreed with Gilliam that his approach was better suited to the group's performing style.

Away from the Pythons, Jones would keep directing, helming the comedy Personal Services (1987), the all-star comedy-fantasy Erik the Viking (1989) and The Wind in the Willows (1996) while turning back to TV for episodes of The Young Indiana Jones Chronicles on ABC and the British comedy series Ripping Yarns, which he created with Palin.

Meanwhile, Jones was becoming a prolific children's author. Between 1981 and 2002, he published 20 fiction novels, including Fairy Tales — selected by Children's Laureate Michael Rosen as one of his five best children's stories of all time — and The Saga of Erik the Viking, from which the film Erik the Viking was loosely based. Jones also wrote the first draft of the early script for Jim Henson's David Bowie-starring cult adventure fantasy Labyrinth (1986), and despite the screenplay going through several rewrites, received the film's sole screenwriting credit.

Adding to an already hugely impressive repertoire, Jones also became known as a noted scholar of medieval and ancient history, writing several nonfiction books and presenting shows on British television that often offered an alternative view of historical periods. He was Emmy-nominated in 2004 for Terry Jones' Medieval Lives, which argued that the Middle Age was a far more sophisticated period than commonly believed.

A vocal opponent of the Iraq War, Jones contributed editorials to British newspapers The Guardian, The Daily Telegraph and The Observer condemning the conflict and the U.K.'s involvement in it. Many of his articles were published in the 2004 book Terry Jones's War on the War on Terror.

Jones' most recent work included the 2012 film A Liar's Autobiography: The Untrue Story of Monty Python's Graham Chapman, which was co-directed by his son Bill and in which he, naturally, played Chapman's mother. He also returned to the director's chair for the sci-fi comedy Absolutely Anything (2014), featuring the voices of Palin, Gilliam, Cleese, Idle and, in his final movie role, Robin Williams. (It was the first film to feature all living Python members since The Meaning of Life.)

Jones also reunited with his fellow comics one final time on stage in 2014 for Monty Python Live (Mostly), held in London's O2 arena and intended as a one-off until popular demand saw nine extra dates added.

Jones also is survived by his second wife, Anna Soderstrom, and their daughter Siri, who was born in 2009, alongside his two children from his first marriage.

https://variety.com/2020/film/obituaries-people-news/terry-jones-monty-python-dies-dead-1203475534/

HOME Film Obituaries

January 22, 2020 5:09AM PT

Terry Jones, co-founder of Monty Python, died Wednesday. Jones died after a long struggle with dementia. He was 77 years old.

Jones was instrumental in creating the wacky, absurdist style of comedy that Monty Python made famous in the 1970s and directed two of the English comedy group’s most successful films, “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” and “Monty Python’s Life of Brian.” In the latter, Jones played Mandy Cohen, mother of the titular Brian, and appeared before a crowd to deliver probably his most famous line in a comically squawky voice, “He’s not the Messiah, he’s a very naughty boy!”

He also wrote the screenplay for the 1986 cult classic “Labyrinth” starring David Bowie.

In 2004 Jones was nominated for an Emmy for his work on the BBC documentary series “Medieval Lives,” and in 1983 he was nominated for a BAFTA for best original song for “Every Sperm is Sacred” from “Monty Python’s the Meaning of Life.” In October 2016 Jones received a standing ovation as he was awarded the BAFTA Special Award for Outstanding Contribution to Film and Television. He was introduced at the ceremony by fellow Python Michael Palin, and Jones’ son spoke on his behalf because he was physically unable to make the speech.

Terry Jones, Co-Founder of Monty Python, Dies at 77
By Variety Staff

Terry Jones, co-founder of Monty Python, died Wednesday. Jones died after a long struggle with dementia. He was 77 years old.

Jones was instrumental in creating the wacky, absurdist style of comedy that Monty Python made famous in the 1970s and directed two of the English comedy group’s most successful films, “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” and “Monty Python’s Life of Brian.” In the latter, Jones played Mandy Cohen, mother of the titular Brian, and appeared before a crowd to deliver probably his most famous line in a comically squawky voice, “He’s not the Messiah, he’s a very naughty boy!”

He also wrote the screenplay for the 1986 cult classic “Labyrinth” starring David Bowie.

In 2004 Jones was nominated for an Emmy for his work on the BBC documentary series “Medieval Lives,” and in 1983 he was nominated for a BAFTA for best original song for “Every Sperm is Sacred” from “Monty Python’s the Meaning of Life.” In October 2016 Jones received a standing ovation as he was awarded the BAFTA Special Award for Outstanding Contribution to Film and Television. He was introduced at the ceremony by fellow Python Michael Palin, and Jones’ son spoke on his behalf because he was physically unable to make the speech.

Born in the seaside town of Colwyn Bay on the north coast of Wales, Jones’ acting career began when he started performing comedy with future Monty Python co-star Michael Palin while at Oxford University. The Python members formed while they all worked on the satirical BBC show “The Frost Report” before making their TV debut as a group with “Monty Python’s Flying Circus,” a comedy sketch show which launched them to stardom.

Jones was mainly a writer and director for the troupe, letting Palin, John Cleese, Eric Idle and Graham Chapman take most of the lead roles in their films, but served as co-director with Terry Gilliam on the group’s first feature-length film “The Holy Grail.”

In the farcical medieval romp, Jones played Sir Bedevere, who is asked to put a woman on trial for being a witch. He devises a test to weigh her against a duck, using the logic that if their weight is equal then she must be able to float and therefore she is a witch. Sir Bedevere is knighted for his wise pronouncement.

“The Meaning Of Life” provided another iconic Jones character in the form of the enormously fat Mr. Creosote. In the iconic restaurant scene, Mr. Creosote orders plate after plate, vomiting occasionally on himself and the waiter. He ends up consuming so much food and becoming so fat that he bursts open, spewing vomit and guts all over the restaurant.

Later in the film, Jones plays a Catholic wife with 37 children and joins in with her husband’s rendition of “Every sperm is sacred,” a song making fun of the church’s opposition to contraception. Each of her offspring comes walking out of their front door in a hilariously long procession, which demonstrated Jones’ uncanny knack for comedic timing as a director.
David Carson
2020-01-22 14:55:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by That Derek
Among his most famous performances in the series was as an inept, bumbling cardinal in the Spanish Inquisition (seen wearing a leather WWI pilot's hat and goggles); a member of the Hell's Grannies, a marauding group of old women terrorizing the streets of London; an overly apologetic French waiter in a sketch involving a dirty fork; a Yorkshireman who had to "get up out of the shoebox in the middle of the night and lick the road clean with our tongues;" and as a nude piano player with an erratic face in scenes often used to break up sketches.
He was the customer, not the waiter, in the dirty fork sketch. I think
some more of these are wrong.
David Carson
2020-01-22 17:38:54 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Carson
Post by That Derek
Among his most famous performances in the series was as an inept, bumbling cardinal in the Spanish Inquisition (seen wearing a leather WWI pilot's hat and goggles); a member of the Hell's Grannies, a marauding group of old women terrorizing the streets of London; an overly apologetic French waiter in a sketch involving a dirty fork; a Yorkshireman who had to "get up out of the shoebox in the middle of the night and lick the road clean with our tongues;" and as a nude piano player with an erratic face in scenes often used to break up sketches.
He was the customer, not the waiter, in the dirty fork sketch. I think
some more of these are wrong.
My bad. Went back to look. Chapman was the customer. Jones was the
apologetic waiter, Palin was the overly-apologetic headwaiter, Idle
was the ridiculously-over-apologetic manager, and Cleese was the
overly-offended chef. Jones had the smallest and least dramatic part
of all the staff, which is why I misremembered him as the straight
man.


RH Draney
2020-01-23 00:41:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by David Carson
Post by David Carson
Post by That Derek
Among his most famous performances in the series was as an inept, bumbling cardinal in the Spanish Inquisition (seen wearing a leather WWI pilot's hat and goggles); a member of the Hell's Grannies, a marauding group of old women terrorizing the streets of London; an overly apologetic French waiter in a sketch involving a dirty fork; a Yorkshireman who had to "get up out of the shoebox in the middle of the night and lick the road clean with our tongues;" and as a nude piano player with an erratic face in scenes often used to break up sketches.
He was the customer, not the waiter, in the dirty fork sketch. I think
some more of these are wrong.
My bad. Went back to look. Chapman was the customer. Jones was the
apologetic waiter, Palin was the overly-apologetic headwaiter, Idle
was the ridiculously-over-apologetic manager, and Cleese was the
overly-offended chef. Jones had the smallest and least dramatic part
of all the staff, which is why I misremembered him as the straight
man.
http://youtu.be/tKrGHQA5qhM
In another sketch involving all five of the "speaking" Pythons as
disparate characters, Jones again had the least interesting role, as the
man giving "getting hit on the head" lessons in a room down the hall
from the Argument Clinic....

BTW, the original post is also incorrect in referring to "a nude piano
player"...the nude musician was an organist....r
t***@gmail.com
2020-01-22 14:44:48 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by That Derek
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/terry-jones-dead-monty-python-founder-british-comedy-icon-was-77-963478
TV
Terry Jones, 'Monty Python' Co-Founder and British Comedy Icon, Dies at 77
4:49 AM PST 1/22/2020
by Alex Ritman
Jones' son was in tears as he read a speech on behalf of the legendary Monty Python member.
Just over a week since he revealed that he was suffering from a form of dementia, Terry Jones, a founding member of legendary British comedy troupe Monty Python, made his first public appearance Sunday at a Welsh BAFTA event.
Jones' son Bill Jones was on hand to help his 74-year-old father to the stage to collect an award acknowledging his 50 years of contribution to film and TV, breaking down in tears as he read a speech on his dad's behalf.
"We would like to thank everyone. I know it's a great honor for dad to win this award," he said after the pair were given a standing ovation. "The struggles we've been going through ... we are so proud of him."
Fellow Python Michael Palin had earlier introduced his comedy collaborator as a someone who has been "relentlessly prolific while being a wonderful friend."
"The first sketch we performed was as a pair of police officers at the Edinburgh festival, and for the next few years we were inseparable," he said, adding that "life seemed more exciting when Terry was around."
On Sep. 23, it was revealed that Jones had been diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia, which erodes the ability to use language.
This one hurts. To quote the first century messiah Brian: "Blessed are the laugh makers, for they shall live in the Kingdom of Heaven."
Congoleum Breckenridge
2020-01-22 23:48:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by That Derek
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/terry-jones-dead-monty-python-founder-british-comedy-icon-was-77-963478
"He's not the Messiah, he's a very naughty boy!"
Congoleum Breckenridge
2020-01-23 00:40:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by That Derek
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/terry-jones-dead-monty-python-founder-british-comedy-icon-was-77-963478
Farewell, dear Terry J. Two down, four to go.

Love Terry G, Mike, John & Eric x
RH Draney
2020-01-23 00:47:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Congoleum Breckenridge
Post by That Derek
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/terry-jones-dead-monty-python-founder-british-comedy-icon-was-77-963478
Farewell, dear Terry J. Two down, four to go.
And quasi-Python Neil Innes just a couple of weeks ago....r
That Derek
2020-01-23 01:41:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
This is an ex-Python!

(Sorry, it was just sitting there ... or was it nailed to the perch).
t***@gmail.com
2020-01-23 01:50:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by That Derek
https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/terry-jones-dead-monty-python-founder-british-comedy-icon-was-77-963478
TV
Terry Jones, 'Monty Python' Co-Founder and British Comedy Icon, Dies at 77
4:49 AM PST 1/22/2020
by Alex Ritman
Jones' son was in tears as he read a speech on behalf of the legendary Monty Python member.
Just over a week since he revealed that he was suffering from a form of dementia, Terry Jones, a founding member of legendary British comedy troupe Monty Python, made his first public appearance Sunday at a Welsh BAFTA event.
Jones' son Bill Jones was on hand to help his 74-year-old father to the stage to collect an award acknowledging his 50 years of contribution to film and TV, breaking down in tears as he read a speech on his dad's behalf.
"We would like to thank everyone. I know it's a great honor for dad to win this award," he said after the pair were given a standing ovation. "The struggles we've been going through ... we are so proud of him."
Fellow Python Michael Palin had earlier introduced his comedy collaborator as a someone who has been "relentlessly prolific while being a wonderful friend."
"The first sketch we performed was as a pair of police officers at the Edinburgh festival, and for the next few years we were inseparable," he said, adding that "life seemed more exciting when Terry was around."
On Sep. 23, it was revealed that Jones had been diagnosed with primary progressive aphasia, which erodes the ability to use language.
Terry Jones is not dead. Look. he just moved!
l***@yahoo.com
2020-05-13 20:39:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Can't believe I forgot that he wrote non-Python books as well...

WRITINGS:

(With Michael Palin) The Complete and Utter History of Britain (television series), London Weekend Television, 1969.
(With Michael Palin) Secrets (teleplay), BBC-TV, 1973.
(With Michael Palin) Bert Fegg's Nasty Book for Boys and Girls, Methuen (London, England), 1974, new revised edition published as Dr. Fegg's Encyclopaedia of All World Knowledge, Peter Bedrick, 1985.
(With Michael Palin) Their Finest Hours (two short plays, Underhill's Finest Hour and Buchanan's Finest Hour ), produced in Sheffield, England, 1976.
(With Michael Palin) Ripping Yarns (television series; also see below), BBC-TV, 1976-77.
(With Michael Palin) Ripping Yarns (stories; adapted from the television series), Methuen (London, England), 1978, Pantheon, 1979.
(With Michael Palin) More Ripping Yarns (stories; adapted from television series Ripping Yarns ), Methuen (London, England), 1978, Pantheon, 1980.
Chaucer's Knight: The Portrait of a Medieval Mercenary (nonfiction), Louisiana State University Press (Baton Rouge, LA), 1980.
Fairy Tales (for children), Schocken (New York, NY), 1981, published as Terry Jones' Fairy Tales, Puffin (New York, NY), 1986.
The Saga of Erik the Viking (for children), Schocken (New York, NY), 1983.
Nicobobinus (for children), Viking Kestrel (New York, NY), 1985.
Labyrinth (screenplay), Tri-Star, 1986.
Goblins of the Labyrinth (adapted from the film Labyrinth ), illustrations by Brian Froud, Pavilion (London, England), 1986.
The Curse of the Vampire Socks (poetry for children), Pavilion (London, England), 1988.
Attacks of Opinion (essays), Penguin (New York, NY), 1988.
Erik the Viking (screenplay), Orion, 1989, published as Erik the Viking: The Screenplay, Applause Book Publishers (New York, NY), 1989.
A Stroud Valley Childhood, A. Sutton (Wolfeboro Falls, NH), 1992.
Fantastic Stories, illustrated by Michael Foreman, Viking (New York, NY), 1993.
A Fish of the World (for children), Pavilion (London, England), 1993, illustrated by Michael Foreman, P. Bedrick (New York, NY), 1994.
The Beast with the Thousand Teeth (children's), Pavilion (London, England), 1993, published as The Beast with a Thousand Teeth, illustrated by Michael Foreman, P. Bedrick (New York, NY), 1994.
Lady Cottington's Pressed Fairy Book, illustrated by Brian Froud, Turner Publications (Atlanta, GA), 1994, H.N. Abrams (New York, NY), 1995.
The Fly-by-Night, illustrated by Michael Foreman, Peter Bedrick Books (New York, NY), 1994.
The Sea Tiger, illustrated by Michael Foreman, P. Bedrick (New York, NY), 1994.
(With Alan Ereira) Crusades, Facts on File (New York, NY), 1995.
(Captured and catalogued by Jones) The Goblin Companion, invented and illustrated by Brian Froud, Turner Publications (Atlanta, GA), 1996.
The Dragon on the Roof (for children), Penguin (London, England), 1996.
(With Brian Froud) Strange Stains and Mysterious Smells: Quentin Cottington's Journal of Faery Research, Simon & Schuster (New York, NY), 1996.
Douglas Adams' Starship Titanic: A Novel, Ballantine (New York, NY), 1997.
The Wind in the Willows (screenplay; adaptation of the novel by Kenneth Grahame), Columbia, 1997.
The Knight and the Squire (young adult fantasy), illustrated by Michael Foreman, Pavilion (London, England), 1999.
The Lady and the Squire (young adult fantasy), illustrated by Michael Foreman, Pavilion (London, England), 2001.
(With others) Life of Brian Screenplay, Methuen Publishing (London, England), 2002.
Lady Cottington's Fairy Album, Pavilion (London, England), 2002.
Bedtime Stories, (children's book), Pavilion (London, England), 2002.
(Coauthor) Who Murdered Chaucer? A Medieval Mystery, Metheun (London, England), 2003, Thomas Dunne Books (New York, NY), 2004.
(With Alan Ereira) Terry Jones's Medieval Lives, BBC Books (London, England), 2004.
Terry Jones's War on the War on Terror, Nation Books (New York, NY), 2005.
(With Alan Ereira) Terry Jones's Barbarians, BBC Books (London, England), 2006.
The Goblins of Labyrinth, Abrams (New York, NY), 2006.
Fairy Tales and Fantastic Stories, Anova Children's (London, England), 2007.
Terry Jones's Animal Tales, illustrated by Michael Foreman, BBC Books (London, England), 2006.
Evil Machines, Unbound (London, England), 2011.
Trouble On The Heath, Accent Press (Bedlinog), 2011.
The Tyrant and the Squire, Cornerstone (London, England), 2018.


Lenona.
l***@yahoo.com
2020-05-13 20:47:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
And if you want to see those particular book covers in Google Images...the best way is to search on "terry jones" books -python -islam -ereira.

Even so, that doesn't quite weed out the Koran-burning pastor.


Lenona.
l***@yahoo.com
2020-05-14 02:05:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
And if you want to see those particular book covers in Google Images...the best way is to search on "terry jones" books -python -islam.

Even so, that doesn't quite weed out the Koran-burning pastor.


Lenona.

Loading...