Discussion:
DAN INGRAM, 83, 1960s/70s king of NYC Top-40 radio -- powerhouse WABC-AM
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That Derek
2018-06-25 13:59:24 UTC
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https://www.allaccess.com/net-news/archive/story/177761/dan-ingram-dead-at-83

Dan Ingram Dead At 83

June 25, 2018 at 4:37 AM (PT)


(Photo: Art Vuolo)

Sad news to report, as one of radio's best - DANIEL TROMBLEY "DAN" INGRAM - has passed away. He was 83.

THE NATIONAL RADIO HALL OF FAME inducted INGRAM by writing he was, "a radio pioneer and considered by some to be the best Top 40 DJ of all time. The son of musicians, he was born in OCEANSIDE, NY, on SEPTEMBER 7, 1934. INGRAM began his five decade broadcasting career at small stations such as WNRC/NEW ROCHELLE, NY, WALK/PATCHOGUE, NY, and WNHC/NEW HAVEN, CT, and worked at WICC/BRIDGEPORT, CT as 'Ray Taylor.” He moved on to larger markets and was responsible for huge ratings jumps at both KBOX/DALLAS and WIL/ST. LOUIS before returning to NEW YORK to create and sell radio contests for MARS BROADCASTING. In 1961, INGRAM returned to the airwaves at WABC/NEW YORK where he stayed for the next 21 years until it went all-talk. During that period he also did The Other DAN INGRAM SHOW playing jazz on WABC-FM. He combined humor, an irreverent style, and impeccable timing and established himself as the leading rock radio personality in NORTH AMERICA. INGRAM was the master of the 'talk-up,' speaking over the introduction and finishing his thoughts at the exact moment the lyrics started. After hosting the CBS RADIO’s syndicated Top 40 Satellite Survey and a stint on WKTU-FM/NEW YORK, he joined the oldies station WCBS-FM/NEW YORK in 1991 where he worked until he retired in 2003. DAN INGRAM was inducted into the RADIO HALL OF FAME in 2007."
Anglo Saxon
2018-06-25 14:22:47 UTC
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That Derek wrote:
https://www.allaccess.com/net-news/archive/story/177761/dan-ingram-dead-at-83
Post by That Derek
Dan Ingram Dead At 83
June 25, 2018 at 4:37 AM (PT)
INGRAM was the master of the 'talk-up,' speaking over the introduction
and finishing his thoughts at the exact moment the lyrics started. >

Damn, I HATED that. Still ranting after all these years.
t***@gmail.com
2018-06-25 14:55:26 UTC
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Post by That Derek
https://www.allaccess.com/net-news/archive/story/177761/dan-ingram-dead-at-83
Dan Ingram Dead At 83
June 25, 2018 at 4:37 AM (PT)
Wow, the herd is thinning. Ingram was perhaps the greatest top-40 announcer of all time.

Unfortunately Big Dan is going to hell, where Dan now has to recite Dennison's Men Shop ads for all eternity :-)

More Music R.I.P.

Tommie Hicks
That Derek
2018-06-25 16:15:02 UTC
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I just posted this on the NYC Radio Message Board:

Posted by Derek Tague on June 25, 2018 at 11:54:04:

Throughout the 1990s, New York City’s MT&R (Museum of Television and Radio; now the Paley Center for Media) would present WABC reunion events involving WABC luminaries such as Harry Harrison, Bruce Morrow, Ron Lundy, Chuck Leonard, and the indomitable Dan Ingram.

Each session ended with Q&A’s from the audience. One time some yokel inquired of the panel “Hey, what do you think about Howard Stern?” Harry Harrison side-stepped justifying this query and effectively fended off taking up too much of the seminar’s “real estate” by saying words to the effect that Stern was, indeed, quite talented but that he (Harrison) preferred channeling such talent into positive, rather than negative, programming.

After several other questions, I was designated as the one asking the last question of the evening. I proffered “In reference to positive radio, I’d like to ask Mr. Harrison how the annual Christmas-themed ‘May You Always’ recording came about? And, Mr. Ingram, I know you’ve told this story at one of these seminars before, but would you, please, relate the story about the ‘kid on the bridge with a transistor radio’? Thank you.”

Harry told the backstory about how his recording of “May You Always” came about.

Dan Ingram related the story about how on the last day of MusicRadio in May 1982, he and co-host Ron Lundy were reminiscing prior to the switch-flipping to TalkRadio at 12 Noon. On that broadcast, Dan was moved to reveal, for the first time, that in years previous he had received a letter from a young man.

The letter explained that the writer, as a teenager, was living in an abusive family situation, that he was driven to take his own life, and that he ended up atop one of New York’s tall bridges with his most prized possession – his transistor radio. Just before taking the plunge, the boy was tuned into Dan Ingram. Big Dan made him laugh. The letter to Dan further explained that he could not remember the exact joke (probably one of Dan’s quick-witted awful puns), but he realized in that instant that there were things for which life was worth living. He climbed down.

There was not a dry eye in the house.

In 1995, WCBS-FM broadcast a good portion of its Reunion weekend from the MT&R’s auditorium stage. Dan Ingram was there front-and-center. That same Saturday, Disney staged a big stunt event in which they premiered their animated “Pocahontas” on a big screen in Central Park. Traffic outside was chaotic as attendees were arriving hours early in order to claim good “seats.”

During the down time, I proclaimed from the audience, “Why hang out with a ‘Pocahontas’ in Central Park when you could be here hanging out with a ‘Kemo Sabe’?” Dan’s quick acknowledging response was “Well, personally, I never poked a Hontas!”

Dan Ingram was a non-pareil class-act all the way.

Farewell, Kemo Sabe.
m***@gmail.com
2018-06-25 19:24:51 UTC
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Post by That Derek
Throughout the 1990s, New York City’s MT&R (Museum of Television and Radio; now the Paley Center for Media) would present WABC reunion events involving WABC luminaries such as Harry Harrison, Bruce Morrow, Ron Lundy, Chuck Leonard, and the indomitable Dan Ingram.
Each session ended with Q&A’s from the audience. One time some yokel inquired of the panel “Hey, what do you think about Howard Stern?” Harry Harrison side-stepped justifying this query and effectively fended off taking up too much of the seminar’s “real estate” by saying words to the effect that Stern was, indeed, quite talented but that he (Harrison) preferred channeling such talent into positive, rather than negative, programming.
After several other questions, I was designated as the one asking the last question of the evening. I proffered “In reference to positive radio, I’d like to ask Mr. Harrison how the annual Christmas-themed ‘May You Always’ recording came about? And, Mr. Ingram, I know you’ve told this story at one of these seminars before, but would you, please, relate the story about the ‘kid on the bridge with a transistor radio’? Thank you.”
Harry told the backstory about how his recording of “May You Always” came about.
Dan Ingram related the story about how on the last day of MusicRadio in May 1982, he and co-host Ron Lundy were reminiscing prior to the switch-flipping to TalkRadio at 12 Noon. On that broadcast, Dan was moved to reveal, for the first time, that in years previous he had received a letter from a young man.
The letter explained that the writer, as a teenager, was living in an abusive family situation, that he was driven to take his own life, and that he ended up atop one of New York’s tall bridges with his most prized possession – his transistor radio. Just before taking the plunge, the boy was tuned into Dan Ingram. Big Dan made him laugh. The letter to Dan further explained that he could not remember the exact joke (probably one of Dan’s quick-witted awful puns), but he realized in that instant that there were things for which life was worth living. He climbed down.
There was not a dry eye in the house.
In 1995, WCBS-FM broadcast a good portion of its Reunion weekend from the MT&R’s auditorium stage. Dan Ingram was there front-and-center. That same Saturday, Disney staged a big stunt event in which they premiered their animated “Pocahontas” on a big screen in Central Park. Traffic outside was chaotic as attendees were arriving hours early in order to claim good “seats.”
During the down time, I proclaimed from the audience, “Why hang out with a ‘Pocahontas’ in Central Park when you could be here hanging out with a ‘Kemo Sabe’?” Dan’s quick acknowledging response was “Well, personally, I never poked a Hontas!”
Dan Ingram was a non-pareil class-act all the way.
Farewell, Kemo Sabe.
Very sad to hear that my favorite AM disk jockey, Dan Ingram, has died. He was the best, in my opinion, for many years when WABC-AM ruled the airwaves all along the East Coast in the 60s. He was creative, spoke in double entendre, and was very funny as he spinned the hits of the day. Every Tuesday, WABC featured the new Top 20 hits survey for the week on the Dan Ingram show. Several times, I skipped school just to hear that (I couldn't wait until 7 PM when Cousin Brucie repeated the Top 20 countdown). I also was listening to Dan Ingram when the lights went out during the big Northeast Blackout of November 9, 1965.

Marc

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https://www.amazon.com/Until-Birds-Chirp-Reflections-Sixties/dp/1532939035
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