Discussion:
On preventing hot-car deaths of babies...grim
(too old to reply)
l***@yahoo.com
2019-07-29 20:39:57 UTC
Permalink
http://www.refugees.bratfree.com/read.php?2,431462

There are only two posts right now. Here they are:

cfdavep
Iraqi vet claim hot car death really was an accident
July 29, 2019 03:35PM

https://www.yahoo.com/news/babies-dead-iraq-war-vet-162559074.html

The moo (mother) is saying he really didn't mean it and maybe PTSD could lead to such an accident, I don't know.

One of the commenters are demanding that ALL cars have what cop cars now have where when the car hits 90F and no one is in the front, lights flash, the siren goes off and their phones are pinged.

Apparently this dumbass wants ALL cars to cost $5000 more at least for this feature to prevent parents from doing a nasty PNA. Some people ripped into the commenter and said that CF/CL/Retirees would be eating the cost for kids that will not be in their cars.



yurble
Re: Iraqi vet claim hot car death really was an accident
July 29, 2019 05:50PM

For fuck's sake, there's another solution to this problem which is significantly cheaper: start charging everyone whose kid dies in a hot car with manslaughter or murder. Sure, it will cost a bit to prosecute and imprison the first few, but once this becomes routine you can be damn sure the number of deaths will diminish. Regretful breeders will move on to new methods of murder that aren't prosecuted.

(end)



I admit the posters at Bratfree have always been painfully stubborn in their belief that most hot-car deaths are not accidents. (Hint: One seldom hears of pets dying in hot cars - or maybe that's the fault of the media.) However, I have to wonder - why did we never seem to hear of such deaths before the 1990s or so? Horribly hot summer weather has always existed in the Southern U.S., at least.


Lenona.
W.C. Green
2019-07-30 01:29:07 UTC
Permalink
Post by l***@yahoo.com
I admit the posters at Bratfree have always been painfully stubborn in their belief that most hot-car deaths are not accidents. (Hint: One seldom hears of pets dying in hot cars - or maybe that's the fault of the media.) However, I have to wonder - why did we never seem to hear of such deaths before the 1990s or so? Horribly hot summer weather has always existed in the Southern U.S., at least.
Back then, fewer people saw the need to roll up their windows and lock
their cars.
--
Wendy Chatley Green
danny burstein
2019-07-30 01:32:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by W.C. Green
Post by l***@yahoo.com
I admit the posters at Bratfree have always been painfully stubborn in their belief that most hot-car deaths are not accidents. (Hint: One seldom hears of pets dying in hot cars - or maybe that's the fault of the media.) However, I have to wonder - why did we never seem to hear of such deaths before the 1990s or so? Horribly hot summer weather has always existed in the Southern U.S., at least.
Back then, fewer people saw the need to roll up their windows and lock
their cars.
Also.... back then kids sat pretty much
wherever they sat, and were a lot more visible.

Placing them in a kiddie car seat in the rear
makes it easier to forget about them.
--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
***@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Kara
2019-08-03 15:09:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by danny burstein
Post by W.C. Green
Post by l***@yahoo.com
I admit the posters at Bratfree have always been painfully stubborn in their belief that most hot-car deaths are not accidents. (Hint: One seldom hears of pets dying in hot cars - or maybe that's the fault of the media.) However, I have to wonder - why did we never seem to hear of such deaths before the 1990s or so? Horribly hot summer weather has always existed in the Southern U.S., at least.
Back then, fewer people saw the need to roll up their windows and lock
their cars.
Also.... back then kids sat pretty much
wherever they sat, and were a lot more visible.
Placing them in a kiddie car seat in the rear
makes it easier to forget about them.
--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Of course! And parents (mothers) held the more-helpless infants. I really hadn't figured that out.

So we keep looking for new devices to lessen our sense of personal responsibility even more?
W.C. Green
2019-08-03 16:22:13 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kara
Post by W.C. Green
... However, I have to wonder - why did we never seem to hear of such deaths before the 1990s or so? Horribly hot summer weather has always existed in the Southern U.S., at least.
Back then, fewer people saw the need to roll up their windows and lock
their cars.
Also.... back then kids sat pretty much wherever they sat, and were a lot more visible. Placing them in a kiddie car seat in the rear
makes it easier to forget about them.
Of course! And parents (mothers) held the more-helpless infants. I really hadn't figured that out.
So we keep looking for new devices to lessen our sense of personal responsibility even more?
I remember driving to the airport (several hours away) after a trip to
visit grandparents circa 1964. One VW Beetle, four adults, three
children, and luggage. Dad driving, Grandpa in passenger seat with me
on his lap, Mom and Grandma in back seat with younger sister, youngest
sister in well behind back seat with luggage in trunk and underfoot.

Nowadays, the adults would be in jail, the kids would be in foster care,
and the VW would be confiscated and auctioned to raise money for more
police gear.
--
Wendy Chatley Green
danny burstein
2019-08-03 17:19:40 UTC
Permalink
Post by W.C. Green
I remember driving to the airport (several hours away) after a trip to
visit grandparents circa 1964. One VW Beetle, four adults, three
children, and luggage. Dad driving, Grandpa in passenger seat with me
on his lap, Mom and Grandma in back seat with younger sister, youngest
sister in well behind back seat with luggage in trunk and underfoot.
Nowadays, the adults would be in jail, the kids would be in foster care,
and the VW would be confiscated and auctioned to raise money for more
police gear.
a 1964 VW Beetle? Ahhhh, air cooled, the way the Good Book
designed them.

I'm in!
--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
***@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
W.C. Green
2019-08-03 19:23:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by danny burstein
Post by W.C. Green
I remember driving to the airport (several hours away) after a trip to
visit grandparents circa 1964. One VW Beetle, four adults, three
children, and luggage. Dad driving, Grandpa in passenger seat with me
on his lap, Mom and Grandma in back seat with younger sister, youngest
sister in well behind back seat with luggage in trunk and underfoot.
Nowadays, the adults would be in jail, the kids would be in foster care,
and the VW would be confiscated and auctioned to raise money for more
police gear.
a 1964 VW Beetle? Ahhhh, air cooled, the way the Good Book
designed them.
I'm in!
It was probably older than 1964. My family always drives its cars until
they crumble into heaps of rust in the driveway.
--
Wendy Chatley Green
Terry del Fuego
2019-08-04 15:42:05 UTC
Permalink
On Sat, 3 Aug 2019 12:22:13 -0400, "W.C. Green"
Post by W.C. Green
I remember driving to the airport (several hours away) after a trip to
visit grandparents circa 1964. One VW Beetle, four adults, three
children, and luggage. Dad driving, Grandpa in passenger seat with me
on his lap, Mom and Grandma in back seat with younger sister, youngest
sister in well behind back seat with luggage in trunk and underfoot.
Nowadays, the adults would be in jail, the kids would be in foster care,
and the VW would be confiscated and auctioned to raise money for more
police gear.
"I survived my family's reckless ignorance, fuck everyone else!"
W.C. Green
2019-08-04 16:57:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Terry del Fuego
On Sat, 3 Aug 2019 12:22:13 -0400, "W.C. Green"
Post by W.C. Green
I remember driving to the airport (several hours away) after a trip to
visit grandparents circa 1964. One VW Beetle, four adults, three
children, and luggage. Dad driving, Grandpa in passenger seat with me
on his lap, Mom and Grandma in back seat with younger sister, youngest
sister in well behind back seat with luggage in trunk and underfoot.
Nowadays, the adults would be in jail, the kids would be in foster care,
and the VW would be confiscated and auctioned to raise money for more
police gear.
"I survived my family's reckless ignorance, fuck everyone else!"
No way. You're included in "everyone else."
--
Wendy Chatley Green
Meteorite Debris
2019-08-01 21:42:31 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 29 Jul 2019 21:29:07 -0400 that great scribe W.C. Green
Post by W.C. Green
Post by l***@yahoo.com
I admit the posters at Bratfree have always been painfully stubborn in their belief that most hot-car deaths are not accidents. (Hint: One seldom hears of pets dying in hot cars - or maybe that's the fault of the media.) However, I have to wonder - why did we never seem to hear of such deaths before the 1990s or so? Horribly hot summer weather has always existed in the Southern U.S., at least.
Back then, fewer people saw the need to roll up their windows and lock
their cars.
There is actually LESS crime today than in the 1990s. The crime has
dropped dramatically. It's only the media who love to hype news for
click bait.
Michael OConnor
2019-07-30 02:43:04 UTC
Permalink
The simplest solution I ever heard was for the driver to remove their left shoe and put it in the back seat next to their car seat before they started the car. As it would be difficult for them to get very far out of their car without their left shoe, they would remember the missing shoe in the back seat next to the baby in the car seat.
Kenny McCormack
2019-07-30 02:56:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael OConnor
The simplest solution I ever heard was for the driver to remove their
left shoe and put it in the back seat next to their car seat before
they started the car. As it would be difficult for them to get very
far out of their car without their left shoe, they would remember the
missing shoe in the back seat next to the baby in the car seat.
The fundamental problem with that and any other so-called "solution" is
that it assumes both competence and good faith. Most of the perpetrators
of these "little sizzlers" are sorely lacking in both.

Now, I get what you are saying (but I had to think about it for a minute
or two) - that you only need your right foot to drive, so you can spare
your left shoe - but I think most people would feel weird driving with
one shoe on and one shoe off.

Me? I always drive barefoot. Much better grip/feel that way.

Anyway, nowadays, the standard recommendation is to put something you care
about (i.e., your purse or cellphone) in there. More straightforward than
taking off a shoe.
--
Elect a clown, expect a circus.
A Friend
2019-07-30 03:17:18 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kenny McCormack
Anyway, nowadays, the standard recommendation is to put something you care
about (i.e., your purse or cellphone) in there. More straightforward than
taking off a shoe.
Those of us who drive a stick need that left shoe, but I fully agree
that some people appear to need to do something.

I'm still mindboggled at the idea that you can completely forget your
kids are boiling alive in the back seat of your car while you blithely
go about your workday.

BTW the idea that you should toss something important to you in the
back seat in order to remind you that your *kids* are back there --
well, Jeebus.
W.C. Green
2019-07-30 12:15:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by A Friend
BTW the idea that you should toss something important to you in the
back seat in order to remind you that your *kids* are back there --
well, Jeebus.
I'm pretty sure it was Jim Bishop (on-topic NY columnist and author) who
wrote of a man who drove to his favorite bar to spend his day-off
drinking with friends. On his way home, he lost control of his car and
went into the river. Bishop described his thought process as he figured
out how to escape the sinking car.

Back on land, he remembered that he was supposed to drop his son off at
his in-laws before heading to the bar.

I read this back in the sixties in a collection of columns that was old
then.
--
Wendy Chatley Green
A Friend
2019-07-30 12:26:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by W.C. Green
Post by A Friend
BTW the idea that you should toss something important to you in the
back seat in order to remind you that your *kids* are back there --
well, Jeebus.
I'm pretty sure it was Jim Bishop (on-topic NY columnist and author) who
wrote of a man who drove to his favorite bar to spend his day-off
drinking with friends. On his way home, he lost control of his car and
went into the river. Bishop described his thought process as he figured
out how to escape the sinking car.
Back on land, he remembered that he was supposed to drop his son off at
his in-laws before heading to the bar.
I read this back in the sixties in a collection of columns that was old
then.
I loved Jim Bishop's work, so thanks for bringing this up.
Louis Epstein
2019-07-31 18:55:42 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kenny McCormack
Post by Michael OConnor
The simplest solution I ever heard was for the driver to remove their
left shoe and put it in the back seat next to their car seat before
they started the car. As it would be difficult for them to get very
far out of their car without their left shoe, they would remember the
missing shoe in the back seat next to the baby in the car seat.
The fundamental problem with that and any other so-called "solution" is
that it assumes both competence and good faith. Most of the perpetrators
of these "little sizzlers" are sorely lacking in both.
Now, I get what you are saying (but I had to think about it for a minute
or two) - that you only need your right foot to drive,
I have no interest in automatic-transmission vehicles,thank you!

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
Kara
2019-07-30 23:10:55 UTC
Permalink
Post by Michael OConnor
The simplest solution I ever heard was for the driver to remove their left shoe and put it in the back seat next to their car seat before they started the car. As it would be difficult for them to get very far out of their car without their left shoe, they would remember the missing shoe in the back seat next to the baby in the car seat.
Securely anchor the shoe to a hanging mobile directly in front of the child. It would provide amusement, and the parent would be more likely to notice the baby. Write a take-the-baby-too reminder in really big letters and stick it into the shoe. Don't forget a mention of what's to be done with the child.
David Carson
2019-07-31 12:31:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Kara
Post by Michael OConnor
The simplest solution I ever heard was for the driver to remove their left shoe and put it in the back seat next to their car seat before they started the car. As it would be difficult for them to get very far out of their car without their left shoe, they would remember the missing shoe in the back seat next to the baby in the car seat.
Securely anchor the shoe to a hanging mobile directly in front of the child. It would provide amusement, and the parent would be more likely to notice the baby. Write a take-the-baby-too reminder in really big letters and stick it into the shoe. Don't forget a mention of what's to be done with the child.
People should post an update to Facebook when you put the child in the
back seat. They'll notice it during their heads-down zombie-walk into the
store.
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