Discussion:
Jed Allan, 84, TV soap opera actor (Days/Lives; Secret Storm; Santa Barbara; GenHosp)
(too old to reply)
That Derek
2019-03-10 21:21:56 UTC
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http://www.hollywoodnewsdaily.com/14816/days-star-jed-allan-dead

‘Days Of Our Lives’ Star Jed Allan Dead at 84

March 9, 2019
Sue Franci

Former Days of Our Lives star Jed Allan has died at the age of 84. The sad news of Allan’s passing was announced on Saturday evening on his Facebook page by his son Rick Brown according to Soap Opera News


Jed Allan’s son’s post reads, “So sorry to post the very sad news of my fathers passing tonight. He died peacefully and was surrounded by his family and loved so much by us and so many others. Thank you for all who are part of this wonderful tribute to my dad on Facebook.”

Allan was no stranger to soap opera fans worldwide. He began his long-running daytime soap career in with his debut as Ace Hubbard on Love of Life in 1964. From 1964-65, he was also one of many actors to play college professor Paul Britton on The Secret Storm.

Jed is best known throughout the soap world as Don Craig on Days of Our Lives. Allan portrayed the immensely popular character from 1971 to 1985, his exit taking place as many of the show’s veteran cast members were being written out so the show could focus on younger characters.

Allan’s love interest on the soap was Dr. Marlena Evans played by Deidre Hall. In 1977, a prominent storyline quickly started involving Marlena’s jealous twin sister, Samantha (played by Hall’s real-life twin, Andrea Hall).

Dedicated Days fans will remember this particular story line as one of the most exciting of the time. Samantha impersonates Marlena and has her institutionalized. Marlena makes a quick attempt to escape and contact Don, but Samantha catches on.

Don, noticing an extreme personality difference in Marlena, starts suspecting that something is up. With the help of Laura Horton, he releases Marlena and has Samantha arrested. He proposes to Marlena, and the two are married later that year.

During this time, Marlena and Samantha make peace and share a heartfelt reconciliation. Marlena gives birth to a premature son she and Don name DJ. He dies of SIDS, which causes a rift between the couple. Don has an affair and the couple divorced soon after.

Allan’s departure from the soap soon after caused quite a ruckus for Days fans as his character was abruptly written out with no further explanation. Allan did not stray from daytime television for too long and respectfully gained a new audience when he took over the role of C.C. Capwell in Santa Barbara from 1986 to 1993. After his time on Santa Barbara, Allan had a recurring role in Beverly Hills, 90210 playing Rush Sanders the father of Steve Sanders.

In 2004, Allan returned to daytime when he started playing the role of Edward Quartermaine in General Hospital. Prior to starring on GH, he starred in its spin-off Port Charles.

In real life, Allan was married to Toby Brown from September 21, 1958, until her death in 2001. The couple had three sons, Mitch, Dean, and Rick. Allan lives in Palm Desert, California Jed married Toby in 1958. The happy couple remained together until Brown’s death in 2001.

Jed Allan is survived by his three children.
Diner
2019-03-10 23:03:07 UTC
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Post by That Derek
http://www.hollywoodnewsdaily.com/14816/days-star-jed-allan-dead
‘Days Of Our Lives’ Star Jed Allan Dead at 84
And he was the host of Celebrity Bowling!
David Carson
2019-03-10 23:57:36 UTC
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Post by That Derek
http://www.hollywoodnewsdaily.com/14816/days-star-jed-allan-dead
Allan’s departure from the soap soon after caused quite a ruckus for Days fans as his character was abruptly written out with no further explanation. Allan did not stray from daytime television for too long and respectfully gained a new audience when he took over the role of C.C. Capwell in Santa Barbara from 1986 to 1993.
According to IMDB, he was on 1,100 episodes of "Santa Barbara."
David Carson
2019-03-11 14:00:27 UTC
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Post by David Carson
Post by That Derek
http://www.hollywoodnewsdaily.com/14816/days-star-jed-allan-dead
Allan’s departure from the soap soon after caused quite a ruckus for Days fans as his character was abruptly written out with no further explanation. Allan did not stray from daytime television for too long and respectfully gained a new audience when he took over the role of C.C. Capwell in Santa Barbara from 1986 to 1993.
According to IMDB, he was on 1,100 episodes of "Santa Barbara."
Now I've been thinking about something. I wonder who has the record for
the most number of hours spent in front of a camera for purposes of
entertainment or news (that is, excluding surveillance cameras and the
like) and the record for the highest proportion of their lives spent in
front of a camera. Would it be someone who's done tons of TV shows, like
this guy? Or perhaps a local news anchor somewhere? Or perhaps an athlete,
like the starting pitcher of a baseball team.

According to
http://www.guinnessworldrecords.com/world-records/most-hours-on-us-television,
the holder of "The most hours on US television" as of 2011 was Regis
Philbin. That's not exactly the same thing as what I was wondering, but I
guess it's in the ballpark. And are they counting every minute of all of
the programs he hosted as him being "on television" even when he wasn't in
front of the camera?
Michael OConnor
2019-03-11 17:08:08 UTC
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It wouldn't be a pitcher, because he only pitches every fourth or fifth day, but how about the catcher? The record for most games at Catcher is Hall of Famer Ivan Rodriguez at 2,427. He's a pretty contemporary player too (1991-2011), so all of his games would have been televised. It wouldn't be the Umpire because there are four or five Umpires and they rotate from position to position every day so they aren't the Home Plate Umpire every day.

However, I'm thinking there must have been a third-rate TV station (I'm guessing like the station in the movie "UHF") in the middle of a rural area that had some guy who did the morning, evening and late-night news, along with all the public affairs shows, and appeared in most of the local commercials, so this guy appeared on camera like four to five hours a day, every day, for many years. He probably owned the station, and I wouldn't be surprised if he lived and slept there. There is probably a guy like that out there who did that starting in the early 1950's thru the 70's or 80's, and if there was, sadly his name is probably lost in history.
jdunlop
2019-03-11 19:04:14 UTC
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A catcher plays fewer games than other position players.

Pete Rose holds the record for most games played, 3562. Since he started in the ‘60s, it’s unlikely all his games were televised. That started with cable TV in the ‘80s. Cal Ripken played 3001 games, so let’s start with him. 3001x2.5 (likely average time of game then; it’s gone up) puts him around 7500 hours.

Our local morning news is from 4:30-9 (two stations), that’s 4.5 hours a day, 22.5 hours a week. Assuming four weeks vacation, that’s 1080 hours/year. So their recently retired anchor probably had 10 years at that rate,and half as much for the ten years before that. So that’s about 15,000 hours, conservatively (he had time before he was an anchor, so it would add more.). That’s giving him “credit” for the full show’ hours, rather than pure on-air time, but the same thing for Ripken, or for Jed Allan, who wasn’t on the screen for every hour DoOL was on.

I’d concur that the likely “winner” is a local news anchor. For national TV, probably a long lasting news reader for Today or GMA. (Barbara Walters, perhaps.). Of course, David Letterman did late night for ~35 years, that adds up, too.
Michael OConnor
2019-03-11 21:26:35 UTC
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Post by jdunlop
A catcher plays fewer games than other position players.
Pete Rose holds the record for most games played, 3562. Since he started in the ‘60s, it’s unlikely all his games were televised. That started with cable TV in the ‘80s. Cal Ripken played 3001 games, so let’s start with him. 3001x2.5 (likely average time of game then; it’s gone up) puts him around 7500 hours.
That is true, but I was using the reasoning that the catcher (and umpire) are in the direct view of the camera during the act of the pitch and when the batter is preparing to swing. Rose was in more games, but in any given televised game, next to the pitcher, the catcher gets the most camera time of any player next to the pitcher.
Post by jdunlop
Our local morning news is from 4:30-9 (two stations), that’s 4.5 hours a day, 22.5 hours a week. Assuming four weeks vacation, that’s 1080 hours/year. So their recently retired anchor probably had 10 years at that rate,and half as much for the ten years before that. So that’s about 15,000 hours, conservatively (he had time before he was an anchor, so it would add more.). That’s giving him “credit” for the full show’ hours, rather than pure on-air time, but the same thing for Ripken, or for Jed Allan, who wasn’t on the screen for every hour DoOL was on.
I’d concur that the likely “winner” is a local news anchor. For national TV, probably a long lasting news reader for Today or GMA. (Barbara Walters, perhaps.). Of course, David Letterman did late night for ~35 years, that adds up, too.
I think Barbara Walters probably gets it for national television.
David Carson
2019-03-12 02:48:18 UTC
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On Mon, 11 Mar 2019 10:08:08 -0700 (PDT), Michael OConnor
Post by Michael OConnor
It wouldn't be a pitcher, because he only pitches every fourth or fifth day, but how about the catcher? The record for most games at Catcher is Hall of Famer Ivan Rodriguez at 2,427. He's a pretty contemporary player too (1991-2011), so all of his games would have been televised. It wouldn't be the Umpire because there are four or five Umpires and they rotate from position to position every day so they aren't the Home Plate Umpire every day.
However, I'm thinking there must have been a third-rate TV station (I'm guessing like the station in the movie "UHF") in the middle of a rural area that had some guy who did the morning, evening and late-night news, along with all the public affairs shows, and appeared in most of the local commercials, so this guy appeared on camera like four to five hours a day, every day, for many years. He probably owned the station, and I wouldn't be surprised if he lived and slept there. There is probably a guy like that out there who did that starting in the early 1950's thru the 70's or 80's, and if there was, sadly his name is probably lost in history.
And then if you add the stipulation of who has spent the greatest part of
their lives *live* on camera (which I didn't express earlier, but I also
think is interesting) it is even more likely to be a local news anchor or
athlete, less likely to be a nationally-seen host, and would definitely
not be an actor.
Michael OConnor
2019-03-12 03:14:31 UTC
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Post by David Carson
And then if you add the stipulation of who has spent the greatest part of
their lives *live* on camera (which I didn't express earlier, but I also
think is interesting) it is even more likely to be a local news anchor or
athlete, less likely to be a nationally-seen host, and would definitely
not be an actor.
I don't know how much repeating they did on CNN Headline News, but for programs broadcast nationally (over cable anyways), I would think Chuck Roberts would have to be considered as he was an anchor for them for more than 20 years IIRC, doing 4-6 hours a day five days a week. I know a good deal of it was live and some of the broadcasts were repeated.
e***@gmail.com
2019-03-12 01:33:55 UTC
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As I recall Jed Allan was the host of Celebrity Bowling in the 70s or early 80s. they run that on one of the retro stations sometimes and when I come across it, I get hooked into watching it. Depends on what celebrities are on of course.
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