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For new mothers, a common cause of death is...
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Lenona
2021-09-24 02:13:35 UTC
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...guess what?

Suicide.

https://www.yahoo.com/news/moms-dying-alarming-rates-us-155635814.html

Excerpt:

...Even though more than 50% of postpartum patients who die by suicide visited an emergency department within one month of their death, they weren't caught. There are no universal screening protocols, there's a shortage of mental-health providers, and maternal healthcare professionals often aren't trained in or incentivized to take the time to ask about mental health.

"Too often we put the onus on the mom to say 'I'm not doing well," Griffen said. And that's not easy.

There is still a stigma around mental illness, particularly among new parents who often feel they should be intoxicated from the smell of their newborn's soft skin and basking in the bond of breastfeeding.

Plus, you first have to recognize what you're going through. Griffen's experience didn't feel like postpartum depression. "I wasn't sad," she said. "I was pissed off, I was angry, I was overwhelmed. I was all of those other things."

Matthews couldn't even articulate what "help" would look like. "I don't even know what this is," she thought, "so how can you help me?"...
Adam H. Kerman
2021-09-24 03:40:49 UTC
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Post by Lenona
...guess what?
Suicide.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/moms-dying-alarming-rates-us-155635814.html
...Even though more than 50% of postpartum patients who die by suicide
visited an emergency department within one month of their death, they
weren't caught. There are no universal screening protocols, there's a
shortage of mental-health providers, and maternal healthcare
professionals often aren't trained in or incentivized to take the time
to ask about mental health.
That's nice. What the hell would universal screening protocols look like
anyway, and why the hell would we expect there to be that kind of
expertise in an emergency department? There's a lot wrong with health
care in the United States, but a huge problem is that people think the
right first step is start looking for care in the emergency department
in lieu of following up with their own physicians or in this case, the
obstetrician.
Post by Lenona
"Too often we put the onus on the mom to say 'I'm not doing well,"
Griffen said. And that's not easy.
The onus is always on the patient. She's the one experiencing symptoms.
No one else can experience them for her.
Post by Lenona
There is still a stigma around mental illness, particularly among new
parents who often feel they should be intoxicated from the smell of
their newborn's soft skin and basking in the bond of breastfeeding.
This is just all-purpose hand waiving. Plenty of pregnant women,
sometimes together with their husbands, have ongoing prenatal care. That
would be the time to warn them to look for symptoms of postpartum
depression and the need to take it seriously as there is a risk of
suicide.
Post by Lenona
Plus, you first have to recognize what you're going through. Griffen's
experience didn't feel like postpartum depression. "I wasn't sad," she
said. "I was pissed off, I was angry, I was overwhelmed. I was all of
those other things."
Ok
Post by Lenona
Matthews couldn't even articulate what "help" would look like. "I don't
even know what this is," she thought, "so how can you help me?"...
Ok

And yet, they expect there to be universal screening protocols? She's an
example that one size doesn't fit all.
J.D. Baldwin
2021-09-24 13:08:11 UTC
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Post by Lenona
...guess what?
Suicide.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/moms-dying-alarming-rates-us-155635814.html
I notice there are no actual *numbers* in that article. One of the
links therein leads to a page claiming there were 1,347 deaths to
women within a year of pregnancy over a ten-year period. As death
rates go, that isn't even noise.

Young American women simply don't die very often. When an event is
very rare, finding a sub-event that's only slightly more rare becomes
"common." But it's anything but common. In 2016 alone, more than
three times that number of teen-aged males committed suicide.
--
_+_ From the catapult of |If anyone objects to any statement I make, I am
_|70|___:)=}- J.D. Baldwin |quite prepared not only to retract it, but also
\ / ***@panix.com|to deny under oath that I ever made it.-T. Lehrer
***~~~~----------------------------------------------------------------------
Lenona
2021-09-24 13:43:47 UTC
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Post by Lenona
...guess what?
Suicide.
https://www.yahoo.com/news/moms-dying-alarming-rates-us-155635814.html
I notice there are no actual *numbers* in that article. One of the
links therein leads to a page claiming there were 1,347 deaths to
women within a year of pregnancy over a ten-year period. As death
rates go, that isn't even noise.
Young American women simply don't die very often. When an event is
very rare, finding a sub-event that's only slightly more rare becomes
"common." But it's anything but common. In 2016 alone, more than
three times that number of teen-aged males committed suicide.
---

OK, point taken.

But in the meantime...check out this short thread regarding the same article.

http://www.refugees.bratfree.com/read.php?2,442552
Terry del Fuego
2021-09-24 16:42:41 UTC
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Post by Lenona
But in the meantime...check out this short thread regarding the same article.
http://www.refugees.bratfree.com/read.php?2,442552
Cambion for president.

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