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ALEX TREBEK: Listen Carefully
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d***@gmail.com
2019-05-29 14:32:34 UTC
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Learning to Listen Carefully

LOS ANGELES — "Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek says his doctors say he's in "near remission" (so... not in remission)...

of advanced pancreatic cancer and his response to the treatment is "kind of mind-boggling (so... not mind-boggling)."

The American Cancer Society estimates 3% of patients with stage 4 pancreatic cancer are alive 5 years after being diagnosed.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-05-29 14:56:05 UTC
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Post by d***@gmail.com
Learning to Listen Carefully
LOS ANGELES — "Jeopardy!" host Alex Trebek says his doctors say he's
in "near remission" (so... not in remission)...
of advanced pancreatic cancer and his response to the treatment is "kind
of mind-boggling (so... not mind-boggling)."
The American Cancer Society estimates 3% of patients with stage 4
pancreatic cancer are alive 5 years after being diagnosed.
It's the worst imaginable death from cancer. Just take an around the
world trip, see what you always wanted to see. There's no successful
treatment for it.
That Derek
2019-05-29 16:15:04 UTC
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Just take an around the world trip, see what you always wanted to see
It worked for Ben Gazzara. His character was given one year to live and "Run for Your Life" ran for three seasons.
danny burstein
2019-05-29 17:21:54 UTC
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Post by That Derek
Just take an around the world trip, see what you always wanted to see
It worked for Ben Gazzara. His character was given one year to live and "Run for Your Life" ran for three seasons.
<plus one>
--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
***@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
David LaRue
2019-05-29 20:40:31 UTC
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Post by danny burstein
Post by That Derek
Just take an around the world trip, see what you always wanted to see
It worked for Ben Gazzara. His character was given one year to live and
"Run for Your Life" ran for three seasons.
Post by danny burstein
<plus one>
My dad was diagnosed with esophogeal cancer within months after his
retirement. They gave him 3 months. He managed to do well and spend his
final three and a half years with family and friends. The doctors helped
improve his outcome; family and friends provided the motivation to sustain
him through difficult times.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-05-29 22:28:34 UTC
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Post by That Derek
Post by danny burstein
Post by That Derek
Just take an around the world trip, see what you always wanted to see
It worked for Ben Gazzara. His character was given one year to live and
"Run for Your Life" ran for three seasons.
Post by danny burstein
<plus one>
My dad was diagnosed with esophogeal cancer within months after his
retirement. They gave him 3 months. He managed to do well and spend his
final three and a half years with family and friends. The doctors helped
improve his outcome; family and friends provided the motivation to sustain
him through difficult times.
Glad to hear that.
RH Draney
2019-05-30 08:07:46 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by That Derek
Post by danny burstein
Post by That Derek
Just take an around the world trip, see what you always wanted to see
It worked for Ben Gazzara. His character was given one year to live and
"Run for Your Life" ran for three seasons.
Post by danny burstein
<plus one>
My dad was diagnosed with esophogeal cancer within months after his
retirement. They gave him 3 months. He managed to do well and spend his
final three and a half years with family and friends. The doctors helped
improve his outcome; family and friends provided the motivation to sustain
him through difficult times.
Glad to hear that.
And then there was Stephen Hawking, who wasn't supposed to see 25 but
outlived all the doctors who told him that....r
Kara
2019-05-30 18:41:55 UTC
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Few get surgery for grim pancreatic cancer that Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg got

Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg

WASHINGTON -- Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg got a shot at survival that unfortunately few people with pancreatic cancer do: not just care from a celebrated specialist but the chance to have surgery at all.

As few as 10 of every 100 patients have their pancreatic tumor cut out. The majority have the most aggressive form of pancreatic cancer, called adenocarcinoma, and usually it's too far gone to operate.

This is one of the most formidable cancers. The American Cancer Society estimates that nearly 38,000 people last year were diagnosed with it, and no more than 5 percent overall survive five years.

But look at those whose cancer is caught early enough for surgery, followed by chemotherapy, and that five-year survival grows, reaching anywhere from 20 percent to 24 percent.

And very occasionally -- 10 percent to 15 percent of the time -- patients have a far less aggressive form of pancreatic cancer called an islet-cell tumor. Those sometimes are curable.

Ginsburg's surgeon, well-known specialist Dr. Murray Brennan of New York's Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, offered no clue Thursday about what type of cancer the justice has or her prognosis. A court statement characterized it only as apparently early stage.

This is key: Ginsburg, who survived colon cancer a decade ago, reported no symptoms -- but doctors spotted the very small new tumor by accident when she had a CT scan as part of a regular checkup.

Because the small tumor also was in the center of the pancreas, she almost certainly had a slightly easier surgery than most patients, removing what's called the body and tail of the pancreas plus her spleen, said Dr. Aaron Sasson, a pancreatic cancer surgeon at the University of Nebraska Medical Center. Most patients require the more arduous Whipple procedure that removes a trickier side of the pancreas, part of the small intestine, the gallbladder and bile duct, and sometimes part of the stomach.

Why is cancer in such a tiny organ so grim? Not only is it typically aggressive, there's no early detection test. Vague indigestion may be the only early sign. By the time such classic symptoms as yellowing skin, itching, weight loss and abdominal pain appear, the cancer has spread.

Scientists know far less about what causes pancreatic cancer than about most other solid tumors. But smoking and a family history of the disease are considered the top risk factors; high-fat diets, diabetes and a chronically inflamed pancreas may be risks, too.

Once the cancer has spread, chemotherapy helps minimize symptoms and slow its march.

Surgery patients with adenocarcinoma also need chemotherapy, typically the drug gemcitabine, to attack remaining cancer cells, said Dr. John Marshall, a medical oncologist at Georgetown University Hospital who specializes in pancreatic cancer. Their prognosis depends largely on whether the tumor had reached lymph nodes.

But the success rates are frustrating: "Twenty percent is still a crummy number," Marshall said.

So most patients are encouraged to consider enrolling in research studies looking for better treatments. One such study is being closely watched: Testing whether an immune therapy can block the cancer's return when the tumor contained a specific genetic mutation.

https://www.cleveland.com/nation/2009/02/few_get_surgery_for_grim_pancr.html
d***@gmail.com
2019-09-17 22:53:11 UTC
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Mr. Trebek just started another round of chemo. Not sure 🤔 what it means ... but it’s not good.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-09-18 19:11:29 UTC
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Mr. Trebek just started another round of chemo. Not sure what it
means ... but it’s not good.
I heard that yesterday as well. Poor guy. He's in terrible shape. I'm
really sorry for him.

Every time I hear about someone getting treated aggressively for
pancreatic cancer, it's just mind numbing. The odds of five year survival
are just too low. I don't see the harm from chemo outweighing benefit.

Of all the truly horrible cancers, this one is the worst.
d***@gmail.com
2019-09-19 20:42:10 UTC
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I heard that yesterday as well. Poor guy. He's in terrible shape. I'm
really sorry for him.

Every time I hear about someone getting treated aggressively for
pancreatic cancer, it's just mind numbing. The odds of five year survival
are just too low. I don't see the harm from chemo outweighing benefit.

Of all the truly horrible cancers, this one is the worst.

I think, hope, I would forgo chem for shorter but better quality of life. In support of this, I have never had a mammogram because I wouldn’t take their treatment. I am 70 and I am tired of being referred for a mammogram which is worthless in my case.

Pancreatic has 3% survival rate and it hits fast.
d***@gmail.com
2019-10-07 19:04:58 UTC
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This guy has had his share of trouble 🤔

CNN — After months of battling pancreatic cancer, Alex Trebek is hinting that his long tenure as host of "Jeopardy!" may be nearing an end.

Trebek told CTV he has begun to get sores inside his mouth from the chemotherapy, which makes it difficult to enunciate. He sometimes hears himself slurring his words on the quiz show, he said.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-10-07 19:25:10 UTC
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Post by d***@gmail.com
This guy has had his share of trouble
CNN - After months of battling pancreatic cancer, Alex Trebek is
hinting that his long tenure as host of "Jeopardy!" may be nearing an
end.
Trebek told CTV he has begun to get sores inside his mouth from the
chemotherapy, which makes it difficult to enunciate. He sometimes hears
himself slurring his words on the quiz show, he said.
He's been sold a bill of goods by his oncologists. He's dying, and the
chemo, which is not going to reverse the recurrence of pancreatic cancer,
is making his last days miserable.

It's entirely unethical to tell him that he has greater benefit than
harm from aggressive treatment, but you know, doctors.
Michael OConnor
2019-10-07 19:58:03 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by d***@gmail.com
CNN - After months of battling pancreatic cancer, Alex Trebek is
hinting that his long tenure as host of "Jeopardy!" may be nearing an
end.
Trebek told CTV he has begun to get sores inside his mouth from the
chemotherapy, which makes it difficult to enunciate. He sometimes hears
himself slurring his words on the quiz show, he said.
He's been sold a bill of goods by his oncologists. He's dying, and the
chemo, which is not going to reverse the recurrence of pancreatic cancer,
is making his last days miserable.
It's entirely unethical to tell him that he has greater benefit than
harm from aggressive treatment, but you know, doctors.
It may be true, but pancreatic cancer is about the worst cancer you can get in terms of survival rate. He didn't have much of a chance no matter which course of action he chose.

I know they haven't announced it publicly, but you know the producers of Jeopardy! must be working to find a replacement behind the scenes. Diversity will probably be the most important requirement of the next Jeopardy! host.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-10-07 21:14:14 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by d***@gmail.com
CNN - After months of battling pancreatic cancer, Alex Trebek is
hinting that his long tenure as host of "Jeopardy!" may be nearing an
end.
Trebek told CTV he has begun to get sores inside his mouth from the
chemotherapy, which makes it difficult to enunciate. He sometimes hears
himself slurring his words on the quiz show, he said.
He's been sold a bill of goods by his oncologists. He's dying, and the
chemo, which is not going to reverse the recurrence of pancreatic cancer,
is making his last days miserable.
It's entirely unethical to tell him that he has greater benefit than
harm from aggressive treatment, but you know, doctors.
It may be true, but pancreatic cancer is about the worst cancer you can
get in terms of survival rate. He didn't have much of a chance no
matter which course of action he chose. . . .
You're not getting it: Prognosis is fatal at this point. He should NOT
be on chemo, period. It's hurting the quality of his life. At this
point, that's the only thing that should be of concern.
r***@gmail.com
2019-10-07 21:54:42 UTC
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On Monday, October 7, 2019 at 2:14:16 PM UTC-7, Adam H. Kerman wrote:
er which course of action he chose. . . .
Post by Adam H. Kerman
You're not getting it: Prognosis is fatal at this point. He should NOT
be on chemo, period. It's hurting the quality of his life. At this
point, that's the only thing that should be of concern.
He most likely would be dead by now if he had forgone chemo treatment.

Chemo has bought him 6 months time.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-10-07 22:21:52 UTC
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Post by r***@gmail.com
Post by Adam H. Kerman
You're not getting it: Prognosis is fatal at this point. He should NOT
be on chemo, period. It's hurting the quality of his life. At this
point, that's the only thing that should be of concern.
He most likely would be dead by now if he had forgone chemo treatment.
Chemo has bought him 6 months time.
Chemo is poisonous torture. Maybe the first round, which put him into a
brief remission, bought him some quality of life time. This second
round? It's impossible for it to have extended his life quality. He
might have been alive all these months anyway.
W.C. Green
2019-10-07 23:18:16 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by r***@gmail.com
Post by Adam H. Kerman
You're not getting it: Prognosis is fatal at this point. He should NOT
be on chemo, period. It's hurting the quality of his life. At this
point, that's the only thing that should be of concern.
He most likely would be dead by now if he had forgone chemo treatment.
Chemo has bought him 6 months time.
Chemo is poisonous torture. Maybe the first round, which put him into a
brief remission, bought him some quality of life time. This second
round? It's impossible for it to have extended his life quality. He
might have been alive all these months anyway.
My Father-in law had small cell cancer after prostate cancer and a
lifetime of smoking. Docs gave him 10% of living six months with chemo
and three months without. He took the chemo and claimed he would
outlive the docs.

He got his six months, but spent the last two of them so sick he
couldn't leave the house. He missed all the family events he wanted to
live to see thanks to chemo's & cancer's effects.

I plan to think very hard should I have to choose.
--
Wendy Chatley Green
Raul
2019-10-09 10:26:41 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by r***@gmail.com
Post by Adam H. Kerman
You're not getting it: Prognosis is fatal at this point. He should NOT
be on chemo, period. It's hurting the quality of his life. At this
point, that's the only thing that should be of concern.
He most likely would be dead by now if he had forgone chemo treatment.
Chemo has bought him 6 months time.
Chemo is poisonous torture. Maybe the first round, which put him into a
brief remission, bought him some quality of life time. This second
round? It's impossible for it to have extended his life quality. He
might have been alive all these months anyway.
After the first round, it was reported that he was in near remission and Alex said his numbers were that of a person without cancer... Then the numbers went south.

The hope with the second round is that it will similarly bring his numbers down to normal again. Granted, each round of chemo kills healthy cells as well, so the odds go down with each round.

Saw an interview with a Stage IV pancreatic survivor of 5 years who is doing well now but who went through several rounds of chemo.

I saw an interview with Alex a couple of days ago and he said he had already begun the second round and continuing to work. Said the TV staff did not notice any decline in his performance although he felt some soreness in his mouth and slurring of words.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-10-09 16:25:50 UTC
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Post by Raul
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by r***@gmail.com
Post by Adam H. Kerman
You're not getting it: Prognosis is fatal at this point. He should NOT
be on chemo, period. It's hurting the quality of his life. At this
point, that's the only thing that should be of concern.
He most likely would be dead by now if he had forgone chemo treatment.
Chemo has bought him 6 months time.
Chemo is poisonous torture. Maybe the first round, which put him into a
brief remission, bought him some quality of life time. This second
round? It's impossible for it to have extended his life quality. He
might have been alive all these months anyway.
After the first round, it was reported that he was in near remission and
Alex said his numbers were that of a person without cancer... Then the
numbers went south.
Yes, we know. I am acknowledging that there was a possibility that the
first round after the diagnosis bought him good quality of life time.

Note: What I'm calling "quality of life" is the time after treatment
ends and you start to feel more normal, Life extension in and of itself
isn't the goal, for if you cannot leave the hospital nor leave your bed
at home, that's not good quality of life.

Thank you for the reminder that he never actually went into remission.
Post by Raul
The hope with the second round is that it will similarly bring his
numbers down to normal again. Granted, each round of chemo kills healthy
cells as well, so the odds go down with each round.
It's pancreatic cancer. That hope is unreasonable. He might have lived
this long receiving hospice care.
Post by Raul
Saw an interview with a Stage IV pancreatic survivor of 5 years who is
doing well now but who went through several rounds of chemo.
I'm sure there's one guy out there who beat the worst possible odds.
That doesn't mean that doctors and patients who decide to go through
aggressive treatments for a diagnosis of this kind are being realistic,
generally, about the benefits of chemo.

Have you ever heard of soemone who has been diagnosed with Stage 1? It's
not a disease that ever gets caught early.
Post by Raul
I saw an interview with Alex a couple of days ago and he said he had
already begun the second round and continuing to work. Said the TV staff
did not notice any decline in his performance although he felt some
soreness in his mouth and slurring of words.
Of course they noticed. They're tv professionals. C'mon. He probably
said something at the time. He's still the star of the show and there's
nothing to do about it but work around his difficulties.

Trebek appears to be absolutely realistic about what he's going through.
He's not being Nora Desmond.
danny burstein
2019-10-09 17:56:45 UTC
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In <qnl1md$ghq$***@dont-email.me> "Adam H. Kerman" <***@chinet.com> writes:

[snip]
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Raul
I saw an interview with Alex a couple of days ago and he said he had
already begun the second round and continuing to work. Said the TV staff
did not notice any decline in his performance although he felt some
soreness in his mouth and slurring of words.
Of course they noticed. They're tv professionals. C'mon. He probably
said something at the time. He's still the star of the show and there's
nothing to do about it but work around his difficulties.
I've got to wonder about an incident a year or two ago,
before he announced his cancer diagnosis.

At the beginning of the show Don Pardo, err, Johnny Gilbert (it
might have been another announcer...) stated that because of
some serious hoarsness and other voice problems, Art Fleming,
err, Alex, had repeated and then dubbed in some of his lines
after the original recording.
--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
***@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Michael OConnor
2019-10-09 18:51:07 UTC
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Post by danny burstein
I've got to wonder about an incident a year or two ago,
before he announced his cancer diagnosis.
At the beginning of the show Don Pardo, err, Johnny Gilbert (it
might have been another announcer...) stated that because of
some serious hoarsness and other voice problems, Art Fleming,
err, Alex, had repeated and then dubbed in some of his lines
after the original recording.
Sometimes those guys lose their voices. I used to be a radio DJ and it can happen if you've been talking for hours. According to the Wikipedia, they shoot five episodes of Jeopardy a day, with two days of taping every other week, for a total of 210 episodes a season (46 taping days). I have no idea how long it takes to film a single episode of Jeopardy!, but I doubt it's a half hour; I'm guessing about twice that. I could see where the voice could give out from time to time or where the host would have to take a break.
Terry del Fuego
2019-10-10 14:42:25 UTC
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On Wed, 9 Oct 2019 11:51:07 -0700 (PDT), Michael OConnor
Post by Michael OConnor
I have no idea how long it takes to film a single episode of
Jeopardy!, but I doubt it's a half hour; I'm guessing about
twice that.
I went to a taping several years ago. They did two episodes back to
back and it happened largely in real time. Each episode had at least
one moment where things stopped because the judges stepped in, but the
interruptions were brief.
Post by Michael OConnor
I used to be a radio DJ and it can happen if you've been talking for hours.
I've recently started doing that and...let's just say I'm grateful
that it's all pre-recorded voice tracking.
Libbie
2019-10-10 19:08:22 UTC
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Post by danny burstein
I've got to wonder about an incident a year or two ago,
before he announced his cancer diagnosis.
At the beginning of the show Don Pardo, err, Johnny Gilbert (it
might have been another announcer...) stated that because of
some serious hoarsness and other voice problems, Art Fleming,
err, Alex, had repeated and then dubbed in some of his lines
after the original recording.
Sometimes those guys lose their voices. I used to be a radio DJ and it can >happen if you've been talking for hours. According to the Wikipedia, they >shoot five episodes of Jeopardy a day, with two days of taping every other >week, for a total of 210 episodes a season (46 taping days). I have no idea >how long it takes to film a single episode of Jeopardy!, but I doubt it's a >half hour; I'm guessing about twice that. I could see where the voice could >give out from time to time or where the host would have to take a break.
Typically three episodes completed in the morning before lunch, two episodes after lunch. They stop regularly due to technical issues, time to schedule the commercial breaks, etc. Regular viewers might notice the challengers start to ring in a little more after the first few minutes. Frequently, they've stopped for a technical issue just prior and the staff gave additional advice on handling the buzzer to the challengers. :-)
d***@gmail.com
2019-10-09 16:37:57 UTC
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You're not getting it: Prognosis is fatal at this point. He should NOT be on chemo, period. It's hurting the quality of his life. At this point, that's the only thing that should be of concern.

I know I wouldn’t take “the cure” which is why I skipped breast and colon tests. I am low risk and wouldn’t take the pointless poison.
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