Discussion:
Frank Robinson, 83, Hall of Famer, One of the greatest players AND the first black manager in MLB
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Bermuda999
2019-02-07 20:35:23 UTC
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Baltimore Orioles Hall of Famer Frank Robinson dies at 83

Orioles Hall of Famer Frank Robinson has died at 83, he was the first player to win MVP awards in both leagues and the first African-American manager in MLB. (Kevin Richardson / Baltimore Sun video)
Mike Klingaman and Childs WalkerContact Reporters
The Baltimore Sun
He had those skinny legs and a gingerly gait that made it seem as if his feet always hurt. But the ferocity with which Orioles outfielder Frank Robinson played baseball belied his appearance. He crowded the plate with abandon and hurtled into fielders to break up double plays. Once, at Yankee Stadium, he decked a fan who tried to rob him of a fly ball.

"I always had the willingness to push myself. I tried to be better than what I was," said Mr. Robinson, a 13-time All-Star and first-ballot Hall of Famer in 1982. "Sure, it’s just a game. But it’s my life."

Mr. Robinson, 83, died Thursday morning at his home in California, according to Major League Baseball.

His baseball life carried him from the recreational fields of West Oakland, Calif., to enduring greatness as a player to pioneering status as Major League Baseball’s first black manager in 1974. President Gerald Ford called that milestone, which came 27 years after Jackie Robinson broke the color barrier for players, “welcome news for baseball fans across the nation” and a tribute to Mr. Robinson’s “unsurpassed leadership,” the New York Times reported.

Pictures: Frank Robinson
Browse photos of Baseball Hall of Famer and Orioles legend Frank Robinson through the years, from his playing days in Baltimore to his time working in the community since.
Mr. Robinson played down the weight of the moment, saying: “The only reason I’m the first black manager is that I was born black. That’s the color I am. I’m not a superman. I’m not a miracle worker.”

But after his debut, in which he also hit a home run, he said, “I feel better than I have after anything I’ve done in this game.” In the 45 years since, just 15 African-Americans have followed Mr. Robinson to major-league managerial jobs, according to a 2018 study by The Undefeated.

In Baltimore, Mr. Robinson will always be known as the fierce leader who brought the city its first World Series championship. Acquired in a trade from the Cincinnati Reds late in 1965, he put the oh-so-close Orioles over the top. His quick wrists and cheeky arrogance helped launch the team’s run of four World Series appearances in the next six years.

Mr. Robinson’s arrival "was like John Wayne coming to help us climb the hill to raise the flag," teammate Bob Johnson said.

Cast off by Cincinnati owner Bill DeWitt, who called him "an old 30," Mr. Robinson seethed.

"I was hurt and angry," he said at the time. "I feel I have something to prove and the quicker I can, the better off I’ll be."

Frank Robinson historic home run
Browse pictures related to Frank Robinson becoming the first (and only) player to hit a ball out of Memorial Stadium, on May 8, 1966.
On Opening Day, 1966, in his third at-bat as an Oriole, Mr. Robinson homered in a 5-4 victory. One month later, he hit a pitch completely out of Memorial Stadium — the only player ever to do so.

"The [one-minute] ovation the fans gave me after I trotted back on the field following the homer was the thing I remember most about my years in Baltimore," Mr. Robinson said later. "I knew then that I had been accepted."

He hit a club-record 49 home runs, drove in 122 runs and batted .316. He led the Orioles to their first American League pennant and a four-game sweep of the Los Angeles Dodgers in the World Series. He won the Triple Crown, leading the league in batting average, home runs and RBIs, and both the AL and World Series Most Valuable Player awards. Moreover, he brought a brassy edge to the Orioles that remained long after his departure in 1971.

"If a guy had on a different-colored uniform, Frank literally hated him," teammate Davey Johnson said. "He gave the impression of having a chip on his shoulder, and he dared anyone to knock it off."

That spunk galvanized the 1966 Orioles, then-manager Hank Bauer said:

"One game, Frank took out [New York’s] Bobby Richardson with a body-block slide at second base, and I’ll be damned if Luis Aparicio, the smallest and lightest man in the league, doesn’t do the same thing the next time he gets a chance."

Mr. Robinson’s take-charge persona helped make him Major League Baseball’s first black manager. On the bench, his demeanor rarely changed. With the Indians, Mr. Robinson once told a reliever being shelled that he was being yanked "because our infielders have wives and children."

In 1988, he became manager of an Orioles team that went 54-107; the next season, they won 87 games and Mr. Robinson was named AL Manager of the Year.

The best deal the Orioles ever made
The youngest of 10 children, Mr. Robinson was born in Beaumont, Texas, on Aug. 31, 1935. His parents, Frank and Ruth Robinson, divorced soon after, and his mother moved her brood to West Oakland, Calif. There, Mr. Robinson attended McClymonds High, played multiple sports and made the all-city baseball team. Graduating in 1953, he signed with Cincinnati for $3,500. Three years later he broke in with the Reds, hit 38 homers and was named National League Rookie of the Year. In 1961, he was the league’s MVP, and after the season, he married Barbara Ann Cole.

Wedding photo
Frank Robinson and his bride, Barbara Ann Cole, on their wedding day in 1961. Wire services reported that they planned to honeymoon in Nevada. (File photo)
But Mr. Robinson’s image slipped that year after his arrest in a Cincinnati restaurant, where he pulled a .25-caliber handgun on a cook who he said had threatened him with a knife. Convicted of carrying a concealed weapon, Mr. Robinson was fined $350.

On the field, his aggressiveness was legendary. Brooklyn Dodgers pitcher Don Newcombe accused Mr. Robinson of “trying to maim people.” In 1957, while breaking up a double play, he spiked Milwaukee second baseman Johnny Logan, who was sidelined for six weeks. Another time against the Braves, Mr. Robinson slid into third base so hard he was punched out by Hall of Famer Eddie Mathews.

The collisions took their toll. In 1962, Mr. Robinson considered retiring because of “the physical beating I’ve taken playing baseball."

On Dec. 9, 1965, the Reds traded him to Baltimore for pitcher Milt Pappas and two others. It was the best deal the Orioles ever made. Four times Mr. Robinson hit .300 or better, while averaging 30 home runs and 91 RBIs in six years here. But he could also beat out a bunt with the bases loaded, and score from second base on a double-play ground ball.

Twice, during the Orioles’ pennant drive in 1966, he fell into the stands at Yankee Stadium while making game-saving catches. Baltimore won its first four AL pennants and two World Series on Mr. Robinson’s watch, and a grateful city responded by renaming the street on which he lived in Ashburton in Northwest Baltimore "Robinson Road."

"Frank taught this franchise how to win, period," the late Chuck Thompson, Orioles announcer, once said. "He hit with power, he could bunt and he was a stickler for detail. If a player made a mistake, he might not hear from the manager, but he knew he’d hear from Frank."

Brooks Robinson called him “the best player I ever played with. I don’t think I ever saw the guy make a mental mistake."

Teammates took note and followed his lead.

"Frank was a joy to watch, kneeling in the on-deck circle," Mr. Johnson said. "He’d be talking to himself, going over the situation. By the time he got into the batter’s box, he had eliminated all doubt of failing in his mind and he was programmed to do the thing that had to be done."

On May 8, 1966, against the Cleveland Indians, Mr. Robinson crushed a fastball from Luis Tiant that soared over 50 rows of left-field bleachers and out of Memorial Stadium. It rolled under a parked car and stopped, 540 feet from home plate.

"I thought it might come down in Scranton [Pa.]," first base coach Gene Woodling said. The Orioles placed an orange banner atop the wall where the ball left the park. "HERE," in bold black letters, is all it said.

In August, triumph nearly turned to tragedy. At a pool party thrown by an Orioles booster in Towson, Mr. Robinson nearly drowned. Somehow, during the hoopla, he landed in the water. Unbeknownst to teammates, their slugger couldn’t swim.

"I saw Frank at the bottom in the deep end, waving his arms," catcher Andy Etchebarren said. "I thought he was messing around, but I dived in and went down to get him."

Mr. Etchebarren pulled Mr. Robinson, gasping, from the pool. Recovery was quick. The next game, Mr. Robinson homered twice. A month later, in the Orioles’ pennant-clinching celebration, Mr. Powell doused Mr. Robinson with champagne.

"Booger, stop that," he said. "You know I can’t swim."

Mr. Robinson’s sense of humor usually served a purpose. With the Orioles, he established a "Kangaroo Court," a postgame session lorded over by Mr. Robinson, who wore a robe with a mop on his head while doling out fines to players who’d messed up on the field.

"We did it only after a win," Mr. Robinson said. "We’d come in, get a sandwich and drink and … bring up whatever mistakes were made. If a guy hadn’t hit a cutoff man, he’d hear about it. People sometimes got the purpose confused. It wasn’t to bully people. It was to get them thinking about the game."

Mr. Robinson also had his own radio sports show, six days a week, on WEBB (1360) AM.

The Orioles' flurry of trades in 2018 -- including Manny Machado, Zach Britton, Kevin Gausman, Jonathan Schoop and Darren O'Day -- will likely be remembered by Orioles fans for years to come.

It could be that one or more of the five prospects sent by the Dodgers in exchange for Machado turn into a star in his or their own right. Or it could be that Machado’s rise as potentially one of baseball’s all-time greats continues in Los Angeles or wherever he winds up going as a free agent.

Here are some of the biggest trades in Orioles history. Where will the Machado deal rank? (Don Markus)
The Orioles took the pennant by nine games, then swept the Dodgers. The last two World Series games were played in Baltimore. Beforehand, Mayor Theodore McKeldin asked tavern owners to ignore the state law allowing them to ban African-Americans from bars.

"I find it a distasteful piece of irony that I must make this plea in light of the fact that without Frank Robinson, a person who could be excluded by such business, we would probably have no World Series," McKeldin said.

Mr. Robinson homered in games 1 and 4, the latter a 1-0 victory that touched off raucous celebrations downtown. That evening, when he and his wife pulled up to their home in Ashburton, exhausted, hundreds of fans converged to greet him. Police tried to hold back the crowd but Mr. Robinson intervened.

"These are my friends and neighbors," he said. "I’m in no hurry until they get their autographs."

Of his 21 years in the majors, he said, none were as self-satisfying as 1966.

"I couldn't have scripted the first year [with the Orioles] any better," Mr. Robinson told The Baltimore Sun in 2012. "That's winning the pennant, that's sweeping the Dodgers, that's winning the Triple Crown and the Most Valuable Player. That's Hollywood stuff."

Orioles in the Baseball Hall of Fame
Look through pictures of former Orioles in the Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y., including Eddie Murray, Jim Palmer, Brooks Robinson, Frank Robinson, Earl Weaver and Cal Ripken Jr.
‘One phenomenal player’
In a June 1967 game against the White Sox, a collision at second base left Chicago infielder Al Weis with a broken leg and Mr. Robinson with the double vision that would nag him for the rest of his career. Still, he helped the Orioles win three more AL flags (1969-1971) and the 1970 World Series against his old team, Cincinnati.

Mr. Robinson was “one phenomenal player,” Orioles manager Earl Weaver once said. "I remember the first game I ever managed [for Baltimore] in 1968, when Frank won it with a headfirst slide into home. I’d have voted for him for the Hall of Fame right there."

In December 1971, Mr. Robinson, 36, was traded to the Los Angeles Dodgers for pitcher Doyle Alexander and three others. Soon after, the Orioles retired his No. 20 jersey. They wouldn’t reach the World Series again until 1983.

Mr. Robinson bounced from the Dodgers to the California Angels and finally, to the Indians. Even as his skills faded, he made a new kind of history in 1974, when the Indians named him the first black manager in the sport.

Mr. Powell was traded to Cleveland that offseason and recalled that Mr. Robinson "really didn’t make a big deal" of his historic achievement "so we didn’t either."

He proved no less willful as a manager than he’d been as the Orioles’ leader, instilling a punishing conditioning regimen that spurred a conflict with ace pitcher Gaylord Perry during his first spring training.

Time with Orioles stands out most for Frank Robinson
Mr. Robinson quickly helped himself in his April 8, 1975, debut, homering in his first at-bat. Mr. Powell added a home run as the Indians beat the New York Yankees, 5-3.

"That was just like, ‘Who’s writing this script?’ " Mr. Powell said. "It was just about perfect."

Mr. Robinson might not have let on at the time, but the day meant a lot to him.

"Of all the pennants, World Series, awards and All-Star games I've been in, this is the greatest thrill," he said later.

His only regret, he said, was that the late Jackie Robinson, the first African-American to play Major League Baseball in the sport’s modern era, could not be there to see the game. President Ford sent a congratulatory telegram.

Times weren’t always so glorious with that team. Mr. Powell said during one bad stretch, Mr. Robinson tossed the names of all his starters in a hat and let the players draw a batting order at random. The hulking Mr. Powell batted leadoff for the first and only time.

Pictures: Orioles unveil Frank Robinson statue in 2012
"I dropped a bunt, just to keep the mood light," he remembered with a chuckle. "Frank just turned his back on me."

Mr. Robinson retired as a player in 1976 with 586 career home runs and a .294 batting average. He’s still the only player to be named MVP in both leagues.

He lasted into 1977 as the Indians’ manager before he was fired, finishing his pioneering stint with a 186-189 record. He managed the San Francisco Giants from 1981 to 1984.

But Mr. Robinson did perhaps his best managerial work for the Orioles during the club’s delightful "Why Not?" season in 1989.

He’d taken over the Orioles under difficult circumstances the previous spring, when manager Cal Ripken Sr. — also the father of the club’s superstar shortstop — was fired after just six games. Mr. Robinson would suffer through the remainder of a record 21-game losing streak to start that season.

Many assumed the Orioles would lose 100 or more games again in 1989, but Mr. Robinson’s youthful crew remained in the pennant race until the last weekend of the season, charming fans with all-out effort on defense and improbable late-inning rallies.

"I like these players," Mr. Robinson said before the season. "I like their enthusiasm."

He could still be gruff, especially toward umpires, but players praised his communication skills and more patient demeanor. The Orioles went back to losing in 1990, and Mr. Robinson was reassigned 37 games into the 1991 season.

He’d manage one more time, taking over the Montreal Expos in 2002 and guiding the team through its transition to Washington. He stepped down after the 2006 season, during which he turned 71.

Mr. Robinson also worked in various front office roles for the Orioles and went on to serve as executive vice president of baseball development for Major League Baseball.

At his Hall of Fame induction in 1982, Mr. Robinson paid homage to Baltimore, Memorial Stadium and its fans.

"Going to Baltimore was the turning point of my life. Section 34, I love you," he said. "My only regret was that my playing career in Baltimore was too short. But the love affair I had with the city, the club and the fans still goes on."
Bermuda999
2019-02-07 20:37:16 UTC
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Attribution:
https://www.baltimoresun.com/sports/orioles/bs-sp-frank-robinson-20190207-story.html

Won AL Triple Crown in 1966

Only player to win MVP award in both American (1966) and National (1961) Leagues

Only player to hit a home run out of Memorial Stadium (May 8, 1966)

Hit grand slam home runs in consecutive innings on June 26,`1970

First black manager of a major league team (Cleveland Indians, 1975)

Named AL Manager of the Year in 1989, taking Orioles from last place to second in AL East

Inducted into Baseball Hall of Fame in 1982
Michael OConnor
2019-02-07 20:50:01 UTC
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Also the final manager of the Montreal Expos and the first manager of the Washington Nationals.

I always thought he was a pretty decent manager. He also nearly pulled off one of the great managerial feats of all time, leading the 1982 San Francisco Giants (which consisted of Jack Clark, a 37-year old Joe Morgan, and nothing else) to within two games of the NL West title.
d***@gmail.com
2019-02-08 00:31:46 UTC
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Amazing man and loss to all.
Bermuda999
2019-02-07 20:43:26 UTC
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Hall of Famer Frank Robinson, baseball pioneer & first black manager,dies at 83
Bob Nightengale and Steve Gardner
USA TODAY
Published 2:49 p.m. ET Feb. 7, 2019 | Updated 3:22 p.m. ET Feb. 7, 2019

Frank Robinson was royalty, a legend in the world of baseball. Despite his tremendous accomplishments on and off the field, it was as if his monumental role in baseball history had been forgotten.

Maybe now, people will pay attention and realize that Frank Robinson was one of the most impactful figures in baseball history.

Robinson, a first-ballot Hall of Fame player who became the first African-American manager in baseball, died Thursday at the age of 83, according to Major League Baseball.

Robinson, who had been in hospice in Southern California for several months, was able to say farewell to many of his friends and family before his death.

Now, perhaps the public can pay proper respect to a man who had a dramatic influence on the game.

Frank Robinson slugged 586 home runs before he retired in 1976, the fourth-highest total at the time.
Frank Robinson slugged 586 home runs before he retired in 1976, the fourth-highest total at the time. (Photo: Louis Requena, MLB Photos via Getty Images)

Few men have had a greater impact as a player, a manager and an executive than Robinson, who was so revered and respected that three different franchises retired his uniform number, No. 20, and erected statues in his honor.

“Frank Robinson’s résumé in our game is without parallel, a trailblazer in every sense, whose impact spanned generations," MLB commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement.

"He was one of the greatest players in the history of our game, but that was just the beginning of a multifaceted baseball career. Known for his fierce competitive will, Frank made history as the first MVP of both the National and American Leagues, earned the 1966 AL Triple Crown and World Series MVP honors, and was a centerpiece of two World Championship Baltimore Orioles’ teams."


Robinson, a 14-time All-Star, had a legendary career. He was the Rookie of the Year in 1956 when he hit a rookie-record 38 homers for the Cincinnati Reds, won the Triple Crown in 1966 with the Baltimore Orioles, and remains the only player to win an MVP award in each league -- with the Reds in 1961 and the Orioles in 1966. He also led his teams to two World Series titles, winning with the Orioles in 1966, when he also was voted the World Series MVP, and 1970.

Robinson, who had his greatest years with the Reds and Orioles, played 21 years in the major leagues before retiring in 1976 with 586 home runs. It was the fourth-highest total in baseball at the time, trailing only Hank Aaron, Babe Ruth and Willie Mays. The longest of those home runs came on May 8, 1966, when his 541-foot blast off Luis Tiant cleared Memorial Stadium in Baltimore.

“We were facing Luis Tiant and he had thrown three straight shutouts,” Robinson said at a 2014 news conference. “I had never seen him before. The first pitch was a fastball down and in and I hit it. You know when you get one. You don’t know how far, but you know you got it.

“When I came into the dugout, the guys were saying that ball went completely out of the ballpark. I said, ‘Get out of my face. No way.’ They said, ‘Yes it did.’

“When I went out to right field, the fans gave me a standing ovation. I thought maybe it did go out.”

He continued to influence the game long after retirement, becoming the first African-American to manage in the major leagues, with the Cleveland Indians. He also managed the San Francisco Giants, becoming the National League’s first African-American manager, and later managed the Orioles, Montreal Expos and Washington Nationals. He compiled a 1,065-1,176 (.475) record over parts of 16 seasons, winning the 1989 AL Manager of the Year award with the Orioles.

In Washington, Robinson said, one of his players asked him in 2005 whether he had played in the major leagues. It was then, he said he realized just how little attention players today pay to baseball history.

Robinson, the youngest of 10 children raised in Oakland, Calif., was a former high school basketball teammate with NBA Hall of Famer Bill Russell at McClymonds High School, and also a former baseball teammate with former major leaguers Vada Pinson and Curt Flood.

Robinson became active in the civil rights moment in Baltimore after witnessing the city’s segregated housing and discriminatory real estate practices, and in 2005 was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom by President George W. Bush. He was honored two years later with the first Jackie Robinson Society Community Recognition Award at George Washington University.

He spent the last 12 years working for the Commissioner’s office mostly as a vice president, and later as a senior advisor to Commissioner Rob Manfred.
Louis Epstein
2019-02-08 07:55:42 UTC
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Post by Bermuda999
Baltimore Orioles Hall of Famer Frank Robinson dies at 83
The youngest of 10 children, Mr. Robinson was born in Beaumont, Texas,
on Aug. 31, 1935. His parents, Frank and Ruth Robinson, divorced soon
after, and his mother moved her brood to West Oakland, Calif. There, Mr.
Robinson attended McClymonds High, played multiple sports and made the
all-city baseball team.
Do any of the obituaries mention if any of his siblings survive?

I remember decades ago the obituary for former Congressman Jonathan
Bingham specified that he was survived by seven older brothers.

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
m***@gmail.com
2019-02-08 19:20:16 UTC
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Post by Bermuda999
Baltimore Orioles Hall of Famer Frank Robinson dies at 83
<snip>

I saw Frank Robinson during spring training 1975(Sun City, AZ) when he was player/manager of the Indians. I was about 20 ft from him when Hank Aaron (playing for the Brewers, a year after he broke Ruth's total home runs record) walked over to speak with him. Yes, I was in awe watching them.

Why oh why didn't I have a camera that day?
Michael OConnor
2019-02-08 20:11:49 UTC
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I've often felt if he hadn't been killed in the plane crash on New Years Eve 1972 that Roberto Clemente might have been named Manager of the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1973 or 1974. He wasn't African American but a dark skinned Puerto Rican. Danny Murtaugh retired as Pirates Manager following the World Series win in 1971, replaced by Bill Virdon, and in 1972, the Pirates won the NL East but self-destructed in the ninth inning of game five of the NLCS and the Reds went to the World Series. Clemente was killed in the off-season.

By the first week of September, 1973, the Pirates were playing just under .500 in a division race they had no reason to lose, but with Clemente's career winding down, (he would have been 39 at the time), had he still been in Pittsburgh at that time, I think there is a good chance he would have been approached about taking over the Pirates Managerial job to replace Virdon, at least to finish out the 1973 season to see if it suited him. Perhaps they would have brought in Murtaugh to finish the 1973 season and asked Clemente to think about managing the team in 1974, to give him time to thing about it and to give them time to line up another manager for 1974 should Clemente decide not to. I think the team and public would have welcomed Clemente as Manager as the Pirates of the era had one of the highest percentages of minority players of any team in the league, he was also the leader of the team, and a fan favorite.

As it turned out, they brought back Murtaugh, who managed them until 1976. By the way, the 83-79 Mets (lowest winning percentage of any division winner in baseball history) won the NL East, upset the highly favored Reds in the NLCS and took the Oakland A's to seven games in the World Series before losing.
Bermuda999
2019-02-09 00:32:57 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
I've often felt if he hadn't been killed in the plane crash on New Years Eve 1972 that Roberto Clemente might have been named Manager of the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1973 or 1974. He wasn't African American but a dark skinned Puerto Rican. Danny Murtaugh retired as Pirates Manager following the World Series win in 1971, replaced by Bill Virdon, and in 1972, the Pirates won the NL East but self-destructed in the ninth inning of game five of the NLCS and the Reds went to the World Series. Clemente was killed in the off-season.
By the first week of September, 1973, the Pirates were playing just under .500 in a division race they had no reason to lose, but with Clemente's career winding down, (he would have been 39 at the time), had he still been in Pittsburgh at that time, I think there is a good chance he would have been approached about taking over the Pirates Managerial job to replace Virdon, at least to finish out the 1973 season to see if it suited him. Perhaps they would have brought in Murtaugh to finish the 1973 season and asked Clemente to think about managing the team in 1974, to give him time to thing about it and to give them time to line up another manager for 1974 should Clemente decide not to. I think the team and public would have welcomed Clemente as Manager as the Pirates of the era had one of the highest percentages of minority players of any team in the league, he was also the leader of the team, and a fan favorite.
[I believe these are correct. Please propose changes or additions as appropriate]


First Black MLB manager: Frank Robinson 1975

First Canadian MLB manager: Arthur Irwin 1889

First German (German-American) MLB manager: Hans Lobert 1942
(for one year – bad timing internationally - plus interim for a few games in 1938

First Cuban MLB manager: Preston Gomez 1969

First Jewish manager: Norm Sherry 1976
(1942 Lou Boudreau's mother was Jewish but after an early divorce, he was raised as a Catholic by his father. Boudreau never claimed any Jewish heritage during his playing, managing or broadcast days, nor did he mention any in his autobiography. I bow to the more learned for an official ruling)

First Dominican (D.R.) MLB manager Felipe Alou 1992

First Venezuelan MLB manager: Ozzie Guillen 2004

First Puerto Rican MLB manager: Edwin Rodriguez 2011 (interim)
(aka Puerto Rican-American aka American American)


Thirty-one percent of MLB players are Latinos 
(and nearly 50% in the minor leagues)
This year there are only three Latino MLB managers (10%)
Two years ago there were NO Latino managers in MLB. (0%)

Bermuda999
2019-02-08 21:46:33 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Bermuda999
Baltimore Orioles Hall of Famer Frank Robinson dies at 83
<snip>
I saw Frank Robinson during spring training 1975(Sun City, AZ) when he was player/manager of the Indians. I was about 20 ft from him when Hank Aaron (playing for the Brewers, a year after he broke Ruth's total home runs record) walked over to speak with him. Yes, I was in awe watching them.
Why oh why didn't I have a camera that day?
It was a long friendship and mutual admiration society

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Adam H. Kerman
2019-02-08 22:03:52 UTC
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Fresh Air re-aired a very old interview with Frank Robinson. His main
challenge as a manager was learning how to deal with pitchers... because
he hated them. That cracked me up.
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