Discussion:
Aminah Robinson, in May, artist, 75
(too old to reply)
l***@yahoo.com
2015-10-08 19:12:00 UTC
Permalink
http://www.columbusmuseum.org/aminah-brenda-lynn-robinson-1940-2015/
(obit)

http://aminahsworld.org/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aminah_Robinson

Excerpt:

...Robinson was born in 1940 and raised in Columbus, Ohio, within the close-knit community of Poindexter Village, one of the country's first federally funded metropolitan housing developments. Robinson received her formal art training at the Columbus Art School (now the Columbus College of Art and Design). She continued to live and work in Columbus. She graduated from the Columbus Art School cum laude in 1960, studying at Ohio State University, Franklin University, and Bliss College. Her diverse body of work ranges from drawings and woodcuts to complex sculptures made from natural and synthetic materials, such as twigs, carved leather, music boxes, and "hogmawg," her own material composed of mud, grease, dyes, and glue...

http://starr-review.blogspot.com/2015/03/walkin-down-long-street-aminah-brenda.html
(LONG article from March, with many pictures)

About the book:

"It's the 1940s in Columbus, Ohio. Take a stroll on Mt. Vernon Avenue. Meet the Sockman, who mends old socks, and the Brownyskin Man, who sells pork rinds: "If you want brown skins, put your finger in the air! The Brownyskin Man will be right there!" Learn about the Chickenfoot Woman and Doctor Kickapoo the Medicineman and others. They're all part of life on this self-sufficient street. A street called home."



Lenona.
l***@yahoo.com
2015-10-08 19:23:36 UTC
Permalink
I forgot to say: The book described, which she wrote, was "A Street Called Home" (1997).

Also:

Elijah's angel : a story for Chanukah and Christmas / by Michael J. Rosen, 1992
("At Christmas-Hanukkah time, a Christian woodcarver gives a carved angel to a young Jewish friend, who struggles with accepting the Christmas gift until he realizes that friendship means the same thing in any religion.")

Sophie / Mem Fox, 1994
("As Sophie grows bigger and her grandfather gets smaller, they continue to love each other very much.")

A school for Pompey Walker / by Michael J. Rosen, 1995
("At the dedication of a school named after him, an old former slave tells the story of his life and how his white friend helped him earn the money for the school by repeatedly selling him into slavery, after which he always escaped.")

To be a drum / Evelyn Coleman, 1998
("Daddy Wes tells how Africans were brought to America as slaves, but promises his children that as long as they can hear the rhythm of the earth, they will be free.")

The shaking bag / written by Gwendolyn Battle-Lavert, 2000
("An old African-American woman willingly shares all she has and is repaid with a bag that provides for all her needs.")

And, more artwork:

https://www.google.com/search?hl=en&site=imghp&tbm=isch&source=hp&biw=1280&bih=890&q=aminah+robinson+books&oq=aminah+robinson+books&gs_l=img.3..0i30.761.3653.0.3796.21.21.0.0.0.0.154.1765.14j6.20.0.ekpsrh...0...1.1.64.img..1.20.1762.-8y3jyLuUIs#hl=en&tbm=isch&q=aminah+robinson


Lenona.
Lenona
2021-03-01 22:29:05 UTC
Permalink
Well, at least three times, I've managed to beat the New York Times by more than a week.

But this has to be the first time I beat it by well over five YEARS!

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/02/26/obituaries/aminah-brenda-lynn-robinson-overlooked.html

By Kwame Opam.

First paragraphs:

Each morning at 4, Aminah Brenda Lynn Robinson would rise from the couch in her living room in Columbus, Ohio, and, with her dogs in tow, commit herself to her many continuing art projects. She would start, perhaps meditatively, with the watercolors in her basement, before moving on to other pieces in other rooms.

Almost every part of her house-turned-studio had been given over to the tools of her craft: paint, brushes, journals, sketchbooks, buttons, fabrics, music boxes, found objects and what she called hogmawg, the sculptural material she made with pig grease, mud, homemade dyes and glue that gave her sculptures an almost petrified quality.

Her vast library, weathered from research, served as a source of inspiration. A steady diet of coffee and cigarettes kept her awake. She worked this way for years — up with the sun, down late at night, sleeping only a few hours before starting again.

In interviews, Robinson would say that art is a way of life, and the way she lived hers was grounded firmly in that notion. Her daily industry came out of a deeply held desire to tell Black people’s stories.

“By the time I reached 9 years old,” she wrote in one of her journals, “I was deep, deep into transforming and recording the culture of my people into works of art. The magnitude of research and study of Afro-Amerikans is what I have dedicated my life. My works are the missing pages of American history.”

She believed that life for her people in America was an act of near-superhuman perseverance, and she was determined to capture that history in every medium she could....

(snip)
Post by l***@yahoo.com
http://www.columbusmuseum.org/aminah-brenda-lynn-robinson-1940-2015/
(obit)
http://aminahsworld.org/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aminah_Robinson
...Robinson was born in 1940 and raised in Columbus, Ohio, within the close-knit community of Poindexter Village, one of the country's first federally funded metropolitan housing developments. Robinson received her formal art training at the Columbus Art School (now the Columbus College of Art and Design). She continued to live and work in Columbus. She graduated from the Columbus Art School cum laude in 1960, studying at Ohio State University, Franklin University, and Bliss College. Her diverse body of work ranges from drawings and woodcuts to complex sculptures made from natural and synthetic materials, such as twigs, carved leather, music boxes, and "hogmawg," her own material composed of mud, grease, dyes, and glue...
http://starr-review.blogspot.com/2015/03/walkin-down-long-street-aminah-brenda.html
(LONG article from March, with many pictures)
"It's the 1940s in Columbus, Ohio. Take a stroll on Mt. Vernon Avenue. Meet the Sockman, who mends old socks, and the Brownyskin Man, who sells pork rinds: "If you want brown skins, put your finger in the air! The Brownyskin Man will be right there!" Learn about the Chickenfoot Woman and Doctor Kickapoo the Medicineman and others. They're all part of life on this self-sufficient street. A street called home."
Lenona.
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