Discussion:
George Frayne, a.k.a. Commander Cody, 77, Leader of country rockers Commander Cody And The Lost Planet Airmen
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Turd Ferguson
2021-09-27 21:21:51 UTC
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https://www.loudersound.com/news/george-frayne-aka-country-rock-maverick-commander-cody-dead-at-77

Frayne was born in Boise, Idaho, in 1944 and formed Commander Cody And
The Lost Planet Airmen in Ann Arbor, Michigan, in 1967. He gave himself
the stage name Commander Cody after being inspired by the character
Commando Kody, King of the Rocket Men, who appeared in the American 1951
science fiction film Lost Planet Airmen.

The Lost Planet Airmen took country music and infused it with boogie
woogie, rock'n'roll, rhythm and blues, western swing and jazz to create
a sound that placed them amongst the first bands to give a
counter-cultural twist to the Nashville sound. They were perhaps best
known for their 1972 hit Hot Rod Lincoln, a cover of a 1960 hit by
singer/songwriter Charlie Ryan.

"We really liked [our sound] and we played that kind of music until we
were booed off stage at the CMA Convention in 1973," Frayne told Seattle
PI in 2013. "In which case we decided that, well, if these guys are
going to treat us like this, we're not going to do their music anymore.
Because their attitude was, 'Who are these hippies? Take a bath, find a
rock concert, et cetera, et cetera.'

"That was the end of our interest in country and western swing. The
people from Texas found out that I wasn't from Texas and they thought
that I was stealing their music and they didn't get it."
radioacti...@gmail.com
2021-09-28 22:07:41 UTC
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Well, to be precise, late frontman Commander Cody was actually George Frayne IV, and yeah, his cover of the Charlie Ryan 1950s hit was a catchy tune, for sure.

The reason the Roman numeral is vital is because you don't want to confuse him with his great-grandfather (or whichever Frayne was George The First). I mean, you certainly wouldn't want to confuse Napoleon I [twice-isle-exiled would-be conquerer of Europe] with Napoleon XIV* [nom do guerre of the guy who terrorized the Hit Parade in the '60s with his controversial novelty song "They're Coming To Take Me Away"**], would you?

BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
________________________________________________
* A DJ at a station early in my radio career told me he had heard that the odd stage name was an allusion to the cliche that many people locked away in insane asylums thought they were that guy with the ORIGINAL Napoleon complex.
** Its B-side was the same song, but in reverse (a la how too many Beatles fans*** moronically played "Revolution 9" in late 1969), and with the B-side label printed in reverse.
*** Including me, I'm embarrassed to report.
Louis Epstein
2021-09-28 23:35:40 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Well, to be precise, late frontman Commander Cody was actually George Frayne
IV, and yeah, his cover of the Charlie Ryan 1950s hit was a catchy tune, for
sure.
Judd Holdren,however,played Commando Cody....and was a former USCG Commander.
Another actor,George Wallace (not to be confused with another George Wallace)
also played the Commando but in another serial in whose name Cody did not
appear.
Post by ***@gmail.com
The reason the Roman numeral is vital is because you don't want to confuse him
with his great-grandfather (or whichever Frayne was George The First). I mean,
you certainly wouldn't want to confuse Napoleon I [twice-isle-exiled would-be
conquerer of Europe] with Napoleon XIV* [nom do guerre of the guy who
terrorized the Hit Parade in the '60s with his controversial novelty song
"They're Coming To Take Me Away"**], would you?
If the Bonaparte dynasty (which numbers all pretenders as Napoleon and a number)
persists a few more centuries there may be another Napoleon XIV.
Post by ***@gmail.com
BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
________________________________________________
* A DJ at a station early in my radio career told me he had heard that the odd
stage name was an allusion to the cliche that many people locked away in insane
asylums thought they were that guy with the ORIGINAL Napoleon complex.
Post by ***@gmail.com
** Its B-side was the same song, but in reverse (a la how too many Beatles
fans*** moronically played "Revolution 9" in late 1969), and with the B-side
label printed in reverse.
Post by ***@gmail.com
*** Including me, I'm embarrassed to report.
-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
David Samuel Barr
2021-09-30 04:17:38 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Well, to be precise, late frontman Commander Cody was actually George Frayne IV, and yeah, his
cover of the Charlie Ryan 1950s hit was a catchy tune, for sure.
As I posted in alt.binaries.sounds.midi on 7/31/1998:

The original version by Charlie Ryan and the Timberline Riders on
4 Star Records debuted 5/9/60 and spent 19 weeks on the chart, peaking
at #33. Johnny Bond's version on Republic Records debuted 8/8/60,
charted for 10 weeks and peaked at #26. [Actually, both of these were
retitled covers of a song called "Hot Rod Race" recorded by Tiny Hill
and His Orchestra on Mercury Records, which debuted 1/27/51 but spent
only two weeks on the chart, peaking at #29.]

The cover version by Commander Cody & the Lost Planet Airmen on
Paramount Records debuted 3/25/72, charted for 14 weeks and peaked at #9.

Asleep at the Wheel covered the song on their 1988 "Western Standard
Time" album on Epic, and a single of it released the same year failed to
chart.
Post by ***@gmail.com
The reason the Roman numeral is vital is because you don't want to confuse him with his great-
grandfather (or whichever Frayne was George The First). I mean, you certainly wouldn't want to
confuse Napoleon I [twice-isle-exiled would-be conquerer of Europe] with Napoleon XIV* [nom do
guerre of the guy who terrorized the Hit Parade in the '60s with his controversial novelty song
"They're Coming To Take Me Away"**], would you?
That guy was Jerry Samuels.
Warner Bros. 5831
Charted 6 weeks in 1966, peaking at #3
Recharted in 1973 for 4 weeks, peaking at #87
Post by ***@gmail.com
BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
________________________________________________
* A DJ at a station early in my radio career told me he had heard that the odd stage name was an
allusion to the cliche that many people locked away in insane asylums thought they were that guy
with the ORIGINAL Napoleon complex.
** Its B-side was the same song, but in reverse (a la how too many Beatles fans*** moronically
played "Revolution 9" in late 1969), and with the B-side label printed in reverse.
*** Including me, I'm embarrassed to report.
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