Discussion:
Cliff Branch, 71, Oakland Raiders 70's-80's Wide Receiver
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Michael OConnor
2019-08-04 06:15:35 UTC
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Cliff Branch was one of the half dozen top receivers of the 1970's, and starred on all three Super Bowl winning teams. Branch hauled in a 72-yard TD pass in the 1974 AFC playoff game against the Dolphins (known as the Sea of Hands game, arguably the greatest NFL game of the 1970's) when he pulled in a bomb from Ken Stabler, made a diving catch at the Miami 30 but was not touched, and then got up before he was touched by a Dolphin player and ran the rest of the way to the end zone. It occurs at the 3:30 mark in the video:



Branch also caught two TD passes in Super Bowl XV, and another in Super Bowl XVIII.

It's been rumored for the last couple months but made official in the last day or two that the Pro Football Hall of Fame, to commemorate the 100th anniversary of the NFL this season, will have a special election in the next year in which ten senior players and several coaches and contributors will be inducted. Cliff Branch was already one of those who was under consideration for getting inducted next year, but I think with his passing his induction just became a certainty. In my opinion, he should have been inducted to the Hall of Fame years ago; he was one of the top deep-threat receivers of all time.

Here is a career highlight reel of his:




https://www.nbcsports.com/bayarea/raiders/cliff-branch-raiders-legend-and-former-all-pro-receiver-dead-71

Cliff Branch, Raiders legend and former All-Pro receiver, dead at 71
By Scott Bair August 03, 2019 7:42 PM

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Legendary former Raiders wide receiver Cliff Branch died Saturday.

He was 71.

His cause of death was not immediately known, and the Raiders confirmed his passing in a tweet from owner Mark Davis.


Oakland Raiders

@Raiders
"Cliff Was My Best Friend.. I Will Miss Him Dearly"
-MD-


“Cliff Branch touched the lives of generations of Raiders fans," the team said in a statement. "His loss leaves an eternal void for the Raiders Family, but his kindness and loving nature will be fondly remembered forever. Cliff’s on-field accomplishments are well documented and undeniably Hall of Fame worthy, but his friendship and smile are what the Raider Nation will always cherish.”

Branch was one of the NFL’s most dynamic receiving threats, and he spent his entire career with the Silver and Black. He was a three-time Super Bowl champion and a three-time All-Pro, and Branch also played in four Pro Bowls.

He finished an illustrious career with 501 receptions for 8,655 yards and 67 touchdowns, averaging an astonishing 17.3 yards per catch. Many consider his career worthy of induction into the Pro Football Hall of Fame.

[RELATED: Branch on Hall of Fame bid, Raiders' golden age]

Branch was an energetic fun-loving personality who always was a fan favorite. He remained active with the Raiders after retiring in 1985, and developed an extremely close bond with Davis.

He was beloved among Raiders alumni, frequently at evens bridging former Raiders from different generations.


Charles Woodson

@CharlesWoodson
In a time of celebration for fellow players being inducted into the pro football HOF I’m saddened to hear about the passing of cliff branch. Another great player that won’t be here to see himself inducted. Love you Cliff @Raiders


The Raiders planned to use him prominently in their transition to Las Vegas relocation in 2020, as an ambassador of the team's brand.

That was fitting, considering he was a constant during a Raiders golen era. He was vital to all three Super Bowl championships, quickly becoming a dominant vertical threat after then owner Al Davis drafted him in the fourth round of the 1972 NFL draft. The University of Colorado was a top track athlete in the 100 and 200 meters. He chose football instead, and used his signature speed to become a dominant deep threat cornerbacks couldn't cover down the field. He led the NFL with 1,092 yards and 13 touchdowns in 1974, the first of three straight All-Pro seasons.

He remained a Raider his entire career, once averaging 24.2 yards per reception. He was always awesome in the playoffs, and remained a productive player at all times into his late 30s.
bill van
2019-08-04 07:38:55 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
Cliff Branch was one of the half dozen top receivers of the 1970's, and
starred on all three Super Bowl winning teams. Branch hauled in a
72-yard TD pass in the 1974 AFC playoff game against the Dolphins
(known as the Sea of Hands game, arguably the greatest NFL game of the
1970's) when he pulled in a bomb from Ken Stabler, made a diving catch
at the Miami 30 but was not touched, and then got up before he was
touched by a Dolphin player and ran the rest of the way to the end
http://youtu.be/xb5brjacHlE
(big snip)

I wonder if his brain will be available for studies. He probably took hundreds
of helmet-to-helmet hits, and suffered more than one or two concussions.

bill
Michael OConnor
2019-08-04 14:33:45 UTC
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Post by bill van
I wonder if his brain will be available for studies. He probably took hundreds
of helmet-to-helmet hits, and suffered more than one or two concussions.
bill
I would think he would have, as the death earlier this week of Hall of Famer Nick Buoniconti of Alzheimer's (Buoniconti donated his brain) brought the point home once again.

There is no telling how many hits to the head Branch endured just from his playing in those Raiders-Steelers games from the 1970's, which were some of the most physical and, yes, dirtiest pro football games ever captured on video. Many of those games are available on youtube, including the 1975 AFC Championship game, where Lynn Swann was put into the hospital with a concussion. The September 1976 game between Pittsburgh and Oakland (also on youtube) is another bloodbath. Watching those games are like watching the football game in the movie "The Longest Yard" (not the remake) but these were actual games, not a comedic football game.

After the 1977 season, the NFL had to do something and they passed what is known as the "Mel Blount Rule", where defenders can only make contact with a receiver in the first five yards of the line of scrimmage.
Alfalfa Bill
2019-08-05 03:46:13 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Michael OConnor
Cliff Branch was one of the half dozen top receivers of the 1970's, and
starred on all three Super Bowl winning teams. Branch hauled in a
72-yard TD pass in the 1974 AFC playoff game against the Dolphins
(known as the Sea of Hands game, arguably the greatest NFL game of the
1970's) when he pulled in a bomb from Ken Stabler, made a diving catch
at the Miami 30 but was not touched, and then got up before he was
touched by a Dolphin player and ran the rest of the way to the end
http://youtu.be/xb5brjacHlE
(big snip)
I wonder if his brain will be available for studies. He probably took hundreds
of helmet-to-helmet hits, and suffered more than one or two concussions.
bill
You've got to think he made plans for that. Otherwise, it would be awkward to phone up his next of kin and ask if you can have his brain.

Obligatory reference for brain-stealing:

Driving Mr. Albert: A Trip Across America with Einstein's Brain by Michael Paterniti.
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