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Death of Lady Knox-Johnston, 62, wife of Sir Robin
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Michael Rhodes
2003-12-03 11:01:44 UTC
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Lady Knox-Johnston, wife of the legendary yachtsman Sir Robin
Knox-Johnston, died 28 November, 2003, aged 62, after a long fight
with cancer.

She was the former Suzanne Singer, and married Robin Knox-Johnston in
1962.

Her husband (CBE 1969, Knighted 1995) was the first person to sail
single handed non-stop around the World, 14 June, 1968-22 April, 1969,
in his yacht, Suhaili, &c.

She is survived by her husband and by a daughter, Sara.


Michael Rhodes (remove x to e-mail me)
Chris
2003-12-03 12:37:29 UTC
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Post by Michael Rhodes
Lady Knox-Johnston, wife of the legendary yachtsman Sir Robin
Knox-Johnston, died 28 November, 2003, aged 62, after a long fight
with cancer.
Blessings be with her, and her survivors in these sad times.
Simple Simon
2003-12-03 17:34:19 UTC
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Wrong! I read Knox-Johnston's book "A World of My Own"
and he stopped and was even aground for several hours in the
area of the Tairoa Heads near Otago past Bluff Harbour,
New Zealand. This occurred 159 days into the journey.

Therefore, it is not possible to fairly state Knox-Johnston sailed
*non-stop* around the world. He definitely stopped.

S.Simon
Post by Michael Rhodes
Lady Knox-Johnston, wife of the legendary yachtsman Sir Robin
Knox-Johnston, died 28 November, 2003, aged 62, after a long fight
with cancer.
She was the former Suzanne Singer, and married Robin Knox-Johnston in
1962.
Her husband (CBE 1969, Knighted 1995) was the first person to sail
single handed non-stop around the World, 14 June, 1968-22 April, 1969,
in his yacht, Suhaili, &c.
She is survived by her husband and by a daughter, Sara.
Michael Rhodes (remove x to e-mail me)
MWB
2003-12-03 19:15:04 UTC
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Post by Simple Simon
Wrong! I read Knox-Johnston's book "A World of My Own"
and he stopped and was even aground for several hours in the
area of the Tairoa Heads near Otago past Bluff Harbour,
New Zealand. This occurred 159 days into the journey.
Therefore, it is not possible to fairly state Knox-Johnston sailed
*non-stop* around the world. He definitely stopped.
S.Simon
Post by Michael Rhodes
Lady Knox-Johnston, wife of the legendary yachtsman Sir Robin
Knox-Johnston, died 28 November, 2003, aged 62, after a long fight
with cancer.
She was the former Suzanne Singer, and married Robin Knox-Johnston in
1962.
Her husband (CBE 1969, Knighted 1995) was the first person to sail
single handed non-stop around the World, 14 June, 1968-22 April, 1969,
in his yacht, Suhaili, &c.
She is survived by her husband and by a daughter, Sara.
Michael Rhodes (remove x to e-mail me)
Picky...Picky ....Picky......
I think what they mean about non-stop, is docking. He must have stopped many
times at sea due to the fact the wind died down.

Mark
MadCow57
2003-12-04 07:45:40 UTC
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Post by Simple Simon
Wrong! I read Knox-Johnston's book "A World of My Own"
and he stopped and was even aground for several hours in the
area of the Tairoa Heads near Otago past Bluff Harbour,
New Zealand. This occurred 159 days into the journey.

Therefore, it is not possible to fairly state Knox-Johnston sailed
*non-stop* around the world. He definitely stopped.<< -- S.Simon

An occasional running-aground is a normal part of any long voyage. Any boater
who tells you he has never run aground is lying.
Reasons: charts aren't always 100% accurate, and the bottom shifts.

I once ran aground in shifted sand right between two daymarks (fixed navigation
aids, not floating buoys) marking the channel. My cousin got out and actually
leaned against one of the poles while pushing the boat off.
§no§hoo
2003-12-04 08:24:46 UTC
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Post by Simple Simon
Post by Simple Simon
Wrong! I read Knox-Johnston's book "A World of My Own"
and he stopped and was even aground for several hours in the
area of the Tairoa Heads near Otago past Bluff Harbour,
New Zealand. This occurred 159 days into the journey.
Therefore, it is not possible to fairly state Knox-Johnston sailed
*non-stop* around the world. He definitely stopped.<< -- S.Simon
An occasional running-aground is a normal part of any long
voyage. Any boater who tells you he has never run aground is
lying. Reasons: charts aren't always 100% accurate, and the
bottom shifts.
I once ran aground in shifted sand right between two daymarks
(fixed navigation aids, not floating buoys) marking the channel.
My cousin got out and actually leaned against one of the poles
while pushing the boat off.
As sure as night follows day, Harry Krause is going to reply here (Ms.
Klummpp writes silly things like this to bait him):

________________________________________________
________________________________________________
________________________________________________
________________________________________________

Good reply, Harry. I knew you'd say that. <g>

snoshoo
Harry Krause
2003-12-04 13:21:35 UTC
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Post by Simple Simon
Post by Simple Simon
Wrong! I read Knox-Johnston's book "A World of My Own"
and he stopped and was even aground for several hours in the
area of the Tairoa Heads near Otago past Bluff Harbour,
New Zealand. This occurred 159 days into the journey.
Therefore, it is not possible to fairly state Knox-Johnston sailed
*non-stop* around the world. He definitely stopped.<< -- S.Simon
An occasional running-aground is a normal part of any long voyage. Any boater
who tells you he has never run aground is lying.
Reasons: charts aren't always 100% accurate, and the bottom shifts.
Another reason, of course, is that the person piloting the boat is an
incompetent. Like you.
Post by Simple Simon
I once ran aground in shifted sand right between two daymarks (fixed navigation
aids, not floating buoys) marking the channel. My cousin got out and actually
leaned against one of the poles while pushing the boat off.
You actually left the dock and went out into the channel? So the therapy
worked, eh? Was that your 500-pound cousin that "actually leaned"
against one of the poles? How did you get him back aboard? With a crane?
--
Email sent to ***@yahoo.com is never read.
Death Marchers On
2003-12-04 23:47:57 UTC
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Have you always been an asshole or that something you reserve for your NG
persona?
Post by Harry Krause
Post by Simple Simon
Post by Simple Simon
Wrong! I read Knox-Johnston's book "A World of My Own"
and he stopped and was even aground for several hours in the
area of the Tairoa Heads near Otago past Bluff Harbour,
New Zealand. This occurred 159 days into the journey.
Therefore, it is not possible to fairly state Knox-Johnston sailed
*non-stop* around the world. He definitely stopped.<< -- S.Simon
An occasional running-aground is a normal part of any long voyage. Any boater
who tells you he has never run aground is lying.
Reasons: charts aren't always 100% accurate, and the bottom shifts.
Another reason, of course, is that the person piloting the boat is an
incompetent. Like you.
Post by Simple Simon
I once ran aground in shifted sand right between two daymarks (fixed navigation
aids, not floating buoys) marking the channel. My cousin got out and actually
leaned against one of the poles while pushing the boat off.
You actually left the dock and went out into the channel? So the therapy
worked, eh? Was that your 500-pound cousin that "actually leaned"
against one of the poles? How did you get him back aboard? With a crane?
--
Harbour Dog
2020-09-29 13:55:27 UTC
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Post by Harry Krause
Post by Simple Simon
Post by Simple Simon
Wrong! I read Knox-Johnston's book "A World of My Own"
and he stopped and was even aground for several hours in the
area of the Tairoa Heads near Otago past Bluff Harbour,
New Zealand. This occurred 159 days into the journey.
Therefore, it is not possible to fairly state Knox-Johnston sailed
*non-stop* around the world. He definitely stopped.<< -- S.Simon
An occasional running-aground is a normal part of any long voyage. Any boater
who tells you he has never run aground is lying.
Reasons: charts aren't always 100% accurate, and the bottom shifts.
Another reason, of course, is that the person piloting the boat is an
incompetent. Like you.
Post by Simple Simon
I once ran aground in shifted sand right between two daymarks (fixed navigation
aids, not floating buoys) marking the channel. My cousin got out and actually
leaned against one of the poles while pushing the boat off.
You actually left the dock and went out into the channel? So the therapy
worked, eh? Was that your 500-pound cousin that "actually leaned"
against one of the poles? How did you get him back aboard? With a crane?
--
Written by some idiot twat who has never sailed in his life and couldn't read a chart to save it..
Chris
2003-12-04 01:46:23 UTC
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Post by Michael Rhodes
Lady Knox-Johnston, wife of the legendary yachtsman Sir Robin
Knox-Johnston, died 28 November, 2003, aged 62, after a long fight
with cancer.
She was the former Suzanne Singer, and married Robin Knox-Johnston in
1962.
My sympathies to the family, and prayers be with them.
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