Discussion:
Who will pass first, Alex Trebek or Beth Chapman?
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d***@gmail.com
2019-04-10 15:45:55 UTC
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Alex has an aggressive cancer, but Beth has a slower cancer for a longer time.

Pretty even... I guess Alex is gone before Beth.
Harvey Fenwick Lung
2019-04-11 19:06:31 UTC
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Post by d***@gmail.com
Alex has an aggressive cancer, but Beth has a slower cancer for a longer time.
Pretty even... I guess Alex is gone before Beth.
I hope it's Trebek. They'll have to stop running that Godawful
annoying commercial he did for Colonial Life.
A Friend
2019-04-11 21:55:47 UTC
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Post by Harvey Fenwick Lung
Post by d***@gmail.com
Alex has an aggressive cancer, but Beth has a slower cancer for a longer time.
Pretty even... I guess Alex is gone before Beth.
I hope it's Trebek. They'll have to stop running that Godawful
annoying commercial he did for Colonial Life.
No, they won't, any more than they stopped running the godawful
commercials and infomercials Michael Landon did for that tutorial
service.


That Derek
2019-04-11 23:17:18 UTC
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Yes, I remember Michael Landon in those early 1990s infomercials for "Where There's a Will, There's an 'A.'" IIRC, Landon granted permission to keep them airing after he took that final "Highway to Heaven" and that they were introduced with a disclaimer to the effect that he had passed.

Also, didn't those classical music send-away TV ads featuring British character actor John Williams (villain, Dial M for Murder; Sebastian Cabot's interim replacement, TV's Family Affair) continue to air years after his coda?

Here's a YouTube video link to the ad in which Williams points out that the song "Stranger in Paradise" was derived from the "Polovtsian Dance, No. 2" by Borodin:


danny burstein
2019-04-11 23:29:10 UTC
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Yes, I remember Michael Landon in those early 1990s infomercials for "Where=
There's a Will, There's an 'A.'" IIRC, Landon granted permission to keep t=
hem airing after he took that final "Highway to Heaven" and that they were =
introduced with a disclaimer to the effect that he had passed.
Ditto a few decades earlier when the actor William Talman,
best known as prosecuting attorney Hamilton Burger in
the Perry Mason tv series. He recorded a bunch of anti
cigarette adverts to be played after his death...

ah... wiki has a writeup (can't find
a copy of the advert, though... If anyone
does... please post):

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Talman_(actor)#Antismoking_advocacy_and_death
--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
***@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
Michael OConnor
2019-04-11 23:37:50 UTC
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Post by danny burstein
Yes, I remember Michael Landon in those early 1990s infomercials for "Where=
There's a Will, There's an 'A.'" IIRC, Landon granted permission to keep t=
hem airing after he took that final "Highway to Heaven" and that they were =
introduced with a disclaimer to the effect that he had passed.
Ditto a few decades earlier when the actor William Talman,
best known as prosecuting attorney Hamilton Burger in
the Perry Mason tv series. He recorded a bunch of anti
cigarette adverts to be played after his death...
ah... wiki has a writeup (can't find
a copy of the advert, though... If anyone
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Talman_(actor)#Antismoking_advocacy_and_death
I also remember Yul Brenner did those anti-smoking ads that aired for a while after he died of lung cancer.
Terry del Fuego
2019-04-13 19:00:57 UTC
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On Thu, 11 Apr 2019 16:37:50 -0700 (PDT), Michael OConnor
Post by Michael OConnor
I also remember Yul Brenner did those anti-smoking ads
that aired for a while after he died of lung cancer.
I'm 99% positive that Brynner's wasn't premeditated but was a clip
pulled from a "60 Minutes" interview. As I recall, his spoken bit
started with "I would make a commercial..." or something employing the
same tense because in context he was speaking hypothetically.
Travoltron
2019-04-13 03:58:32 UTC
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Post by danny burstein
Ditto a few decades earlier when the actor William Talman,
best known as prosecuting attorney Hamilton Burger in
the Perry Mason tv series. He recorded a bunch of anti
cigarette adverts to be played after his death...
Is this it?

danny burstein
2019-04-13 04:07:52 UTC
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Post by Travoltron
Post by danny burstein
Ditto a few decades earlier when the actor William Talman,
best known as prosecuting attorney Hamilton Burger in
the Perry Mason tv series. He recorded a bunch of anti
cigarette adverts to be played after his death...
Is this it?
http://youtu.be/XmjRkpge-jk
Sure looks like it.

Thanks.
--
_____________________________________________________
Knowledge may be power, but communications is the key
***@panix.com
[to foil spammers, my address has been double rot-13 encoded]
A Friend
2019-04-13 10:11:55 UTC
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Post by Travoltron
Post by danny burstein
Ditto a few decades earlier when the actor William Talman,
best known as prosecuting attorney Hamilton Burger in
the Perry Mason tv series. He recorded a bunch of anti
cigarette adverts to be played after his death...
Is this it?
http://youtu.be/XmjRkpge-jk
It is. Talman's display of the portrait of him and Raymond Burr nails
it. Seeing this when I was in my teens was disturbing. Now it's
heartbreaking.
d***@gmail.com
2019-04-17 23:41:32 UTC
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https://pagesix.com/2019/04/17/jeopardy-host-alex-trebek-gives-health-update-amid-cancer-battle/?utm_source=maropost&utm_medium=email&utm_campaign=nypevening&utm_content=20190417&tpcc=evening_update&mpweb=755-7789519-719745364


No real information here, just a PR release. I don’t know why he hast to continue working or why Beth Chapman has to climb a mountain but these are the times that it’s best to get down on your knees.
Michael OConnor
2019-04-11 23:48:20 UTC
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Post by That Derek
Also, didn't those classical music send-away TV ads featuring British character actor John Williams (villain, Dial M for Murder; Sebastian Cabot's interim replacement, TV's Family Affair) continue to air years after his coda?
http://youtu.be/SIMFhPyNKDs
I was talking about this particular ad with somebody just the other day, we were discussion commercials, and the topic changed to which non-PSA television commercial was pretty continuously run for the longest amount of time. They'll sometimes replay old commercials, but I said I thought it was this one, which must have run for about 20 years quite often on cable networks. I know very little about classical music but I've heard that commerical so often over the years I know every snippet of music in the ad by heart and the order they play in. I know they got an awful lot of airplay out of that one commercial.
A Friend
2019-04-12 02:08:48 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
Post by That Derek
Also, didn't those classical music send-away TV ads featuring British
character actor John Williams (villain, Dial M for Murder; Sebastian
Cabot's interim replacement, TV's Family Affair) continue to air years
after his coda?
Here's a YouTube video link to the ad in which Williams points out that the
song "Stranger in Paradise" was derived from the "Polovtsian Dance, No. 2"
http://youtu.be/SIMFhPyNKDs
I was talking about this particular ad with somebody just the other day, we
were discussion commercials, and the topic changed to which non-PSA
television commercial was pretty continuously run for the longest amount of
time. They'll sometimes replay old commercials, but I said I thought it was
this one, which must have run for about 20 years quite often on cable
networks. I know very little about classical music but I've heard that
commerical so often over the years I know every snippet of music in the ad by
heart and the order they play in. I know they got an awful lot of airplay
out of that one commercial.
The commercial for the Time-Life Treasury of Christmas music collection
ran for many years. It got so that you could sing right along with the
snippets.

I don't think ads featuring celebrities dying from smoking are
comparable to Michael Landon's posthumous shilling for that tutoring
thing.
t***@iwvisp.com
2019-04-12 02:29:46 UTC
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The first “dead” commercial I remember is A-1 Steak Sauce and the late Boris Karloff.
Michael OConnor
2019-04-12 02:34:06 UTC
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Post by A Friend
I don't think ads featuring celebrities dying from smoking are
comparable to Michael Landon's posthumous shilling for that tutoring
thing.
I agree, those anti-smoking ads were a PSA to serve as a deterrent against smoking, and it wasn't like Yul Brenner's family was making money from their airing. The Michael Landon ads (there were television ads and also a 30-minute infomercial), aired for more than a year after his death before IIRC John Ritter took over the ads.

The Landon family, I am sure, made money off of this product, which aired after his death. My guess is that Landon made a back end deal shortly before he found out he was sick where he produced this video for this product and took his cut of the sales and appeared in it for free.

I even remember some sort of narrated disclaimer they ran saying something like "Michael Landon thought so much of this product that he wanted these ads run after his death in order to help people", or something like that. I know I sat thru a portion of the infomercial for this product at some point, because I remember Michael Landon admitting he had some sort of learning disorder in his youth (dyslexia?) and saying this product would have helped him, and it would also help others.

I am guessing if you bought the videos, Landon must have appeared in them, and I don't know if they reshot them with John Ritter starring in them in place of Michael Landon when he took over the commercials, but the commercials featuring John Ritter weren't on television very long.
RH Draney
2019-04-12 03:39:20 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
I even remember some sort of narrated disclaimer they ran saying something like "Michael Landon thought so much of this product that he wanted these ads run after his death in order to help people", or something like that. I know I sat thru a portion of the infomercial for this product at some point, because I remember Michael Landon admitting he had some sort of learning disorder in his youth (dyslexia?) and saying this product would have helped him, and it would also help others.
He had a learning disorder in addition to his being a bedwetter?...I
remember the latter from when he sponsored a TV movie on the subject
starring Lance Kerwin....r
Terry del Fuego
2019-04-12 12:41:56 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
He had a learning disorder in addition to his being a bedwetter?...I
remember the latter from when he sponsored a TV movie on the subject
starring Lance Kerwin....r
We're both old.
A Friend
2019-04-12 08:44:01 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
Post by A Friend
I don't think ads featuring celebrities dying from smoking are
comparable to Michael Landon's posthumous shilling for that
tutoring thing.
I agree, those anti-smoking ads were a PSA to serve as a deterrent
against smoking, and it wasn't like Yul Brenner's family was making
money from their airing. The Michael Landon ads (there were
television ads and also a 30-minute infomercial), aired for more than
a year after his death before IIRC John Ritter took over the ads.
Ritter was doing the ads before Landon.
Post by Michael OConnor
The Landon family, I am sure, made money off of this product, which
aired after his death. My guess is that Landon made a back end deal
shortly before he found out he was sick where he produced this video
for this product and took his cut of the sales and appeared in it for
free.
There was a new deal, with more money for the family. My sense is that
there was a fee against a cut of the take.
Post by Michael OConnor
I even remember some sort of narrated disclaimer they ran saying
something like "Michael Landon thought so much of this product that
he wanted these ads run after his death in order to help people", or
something like that.
Very close.
Post by Michael OConnor
I know I sat thru a portion of the infomercial for this product at
some point, because I remember Michael Landon admitting he had some
sort of learning disorder in his youth (dyslexia?) and saying this
product would have helped him, and it would also help others.
I am guessing if you bought the videos, Landon must have appeared in
them, and I don't know if they reshot them with John Ritter starring
in them in place of Michael Landon when he took over the commercials,
but the commercials featuring John Ritter weren't on television very
long.
Neither Landon nor Ritter appeared in the videos. They were hosted by
Claude Olney, a professor at Arizona State University. They are videos
of classroom talks he gave on the subject.

Here's a 1991 interview with Prof. Olney from the Phoenix New Times.
Everything you'd want to know about this matter is in there, including
the fact that Ritter got a cut of the take. It seems from this that
Landon replaced Ritter after about a year.

https://www.phoenixnewtimes.com/news/lawsuit-dept-of-economic-security-i
s-literally-a-toxic-workplace-11265133

Here's a L.A. Times story, also from 1991, about these and other
commercials continuing after the celebrities' death.

https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-1991-08-07-ca-306-story.html
Michael OConnor
2019-04-12 15:39:30 UTC
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To quote Paul Harvey, and now we know the rest of the story.
d***@gmail.com
2019-04-13 00:57:29 UTC
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I don't think ads featuring celebrities dying from smoking are comparable to Michael Landon's posthumous shilling for that tutoring thing.

I’d give Waivers to Posthumous PSAs if they intend to warn of deadly danger.
A Friend
2019-04-13 02:19:12 UTC
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Post by d***@gmail.com
I don't think ads featuring celebrities dying from smoking are comparable to
Michael Landon's posthumous shilling for that tutoring thing.
I’d give Waivers to Posthumous PSAs if they intend to warn of deadly danger.
There used to be a syndicated series, WILD KINGDOM, sponsored by the
insurance company Mutual of Omaha. Host Marlon Perkins would do intros
to the commercials. ("A mother bear safeguards her young during a hard
winter by moving into a cave and storing food. You, too, can safeguard
your young with a policy from Mutual of Omaha.")

Well, Marlon got a fatal dose of cancer and, sure enough, Mutual of
Omaha trooped dying Marlon out to pitch cancer insurance. Their print
campaign in TV Guide even featured Marlon's wife, who was standing by
her haggard husband. I don't know for sure but, given the size of the
balls previously displayed by Mutual of Omaha, I presume this campaign
continued even after Marlon's death.

BTW, darrell, I think your quote thing has glitched. There's no
distinction between what you're quoting and your reply, as (I think)
you can see above. No attribution, either.
Terry del Fuego
2019-04-12 13:12:54 UTC
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On Thu, 11 Apr 2019 16:17:18 -0700 (PDT), That Derek
Post by That Derek
Here's a YouTube video link to the ad in which Williams points
out that the song "Stranger in Paradise" was derived from the
http://youtu.be/SIMFhPyNKDs
I just yesterday learned that the Three Suns'[1] "Midnight Time"
<https://archive.org/details/78_midnight-time_the-three-suns-nevins-dunn_gbia0069546b>
is stolen from Sibelius' "Valse Triste". Sibelius was still very much
breathing at the time, yet the current BMI entry for "Midnight Time"
still matches what's shown on the Sibelius-free record label at the
above link.

I wonder if Sibelius never knew or if he just wasn't as litigious as
the Rachmaninoff estate was by the time of "All by Myself".

--
[1] To the greatest extent possible, I make my listening selections
based on the simple question "What would Mamie Eisenhower do?"
d***@gmail.com
2019-04-13 00:54:33 UTC
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Yes, I remember Michael Landon in those early 1990s infomercials for "Where There's a Will, There's an 'A.'" IIRC, Landon granted permission to keep them airing after he took that final "Highway to Heaven" and that they were introduced with a disclaimer to the effect that he had passed.

Also, didn't those classical music send-away TV ads featuring British character actor John Williams (villain, Dial M for Murder; Sebastian Cabot's interim replacement, TV's Family Affair) continue to air years after his coda?

Here's a YouTube video link to the ad in which Williams points out that the song "Stranger in Paradise" was derived from the "Polovtsian Dance, No. 2" by Borodin:

http://youtu.be/SIMFhPyNKDs

Posthumous commercials creep me out.
bill van
2019-04-13 07:01:44 UTC
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Post by That Derek
Yes, I remember Michael Landon in those early 1990s infomercials for
"Where There's a Will, There's an 'A.'" IIRC, Landon granted permission
to keep them airing after he took that final "Highway to Heaven" and
that they were introduced with a disclaimer to the effect that he had
passed.
Also, didn't those classical music send-away TV ads featuring British
character actor John Williams (villain, Dial M for Murder; Sebastian
Cabot's interim replacement, TV's Family Affair) continue to air years
after his coda?
Here's a YouTube video link to the ad in which Williams points out that
the song "Stranger in Paradise" was derived from the "Polovtsian Dance,
http://youtu.be/SIMFhPyNKDs
Posthumous commercials creep me out.
Imagine how the dead guys feel.

bill
That Derek
2019-04-13 04:07:55 UTC
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Mutual of Omaha trooped dying Marlon out to pitch cancer insurance.
Can it get any Fowler?

Somehow, the feeling's Mutual.
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