Discussion:
Ogden Nash's 50th death anniversary
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Lenona
2021-05-19 16:39:21 UTC
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Incredibly, no one seems to have noticed!

Born in Rye, New York, he died in Baltimore. (He was buried in North Hampton, New Hampshire.)

And, I found out he wrote a 1930s screenplay for The Wizard of Oz!

From Wikipedia:

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ogden_Nash

"Frederic Ogden Nash (August 19, 1902 – May 19, 1971) was an American poet well known for his light verse, of which he wrote over 500 pieces. With his unconventional rhyming schemes, he was declared the country's best-known producer of humorous poetry."

https://www.americanpoems.com/poets/nash/
(about his life, work - plus many poem titles)

"To keep your marriage brimming,
With love in the loving cup,
Whenever you're wrong, admit it;
Whenever you're right, shut up."



Lenona.
Adam H. Kerman
2021-05-19 16:41:55 UTC
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Post by Lenona
Incredibly, no one seems to have noticed!
Why would I notice that someone dead is still dead? If his status were
to changed, I'd notice.
Lenona
2021-05-19 17:44:01 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Lenona
Incredibly, no one seems to have noticed!
Why would I notice that someone dead is still dead? If his status were
to changed, I'd notice.
You know very well I meant that no one else seems to be paying tribute today.
Adam H. Kerman
2021-05-19 17:52:48 UTC
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Post by Lenona
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Lenona
Incredibly, no one seems to have noticed!
Why would I notice that someone dead is still dead? If his status were
to changed, I'd notice.
You know very well I meant that no one else seems to be paying tribute today.
I was being snarky.
Lenona
2021-05-19 17:55:09 UTC
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Anyway, this is from almost 10 years ago, and it's long and interesting.

https://www.baltimorestyle.com/baltimore_what_about_nash_dec_11/

...Jonathan Shorr, however, has a different opinion. Shorr, director of the Baltimore Literary Heritage Project, remembers that “the American poetry anthologies used in English classes contain a little Nash poem or two. But light verse is out of fashion now,” he says. “It was very tasty at the time, of course, but it’s not really long lasting, not part of today’s literary style.”

Beyond that, says Shorr, Baltimore does not seem to be especially interested in its literary history. “Dozens of wonderful writers lived here for most of their lives— Edith Hamilton, Upton Sinclair, Dashiell Hammett— and we don’t recognize them at all. The city’s always in the middle of some kind of crisis, and commemorating authors is very low on the agenda. Those who are memorialized, it’s usually because they’ve got a wealthy champion, or a nonprofit dedicated to preserving their memory.”...
A Friend
2021-05-19 20:02:41 UTC
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Post by Lenona
Anyway, this is from almost 10 years ago, and it's long and interesting.
https://www.baltimorestyle.com/baltimore_what_about_nash_dec_11/
...Jonathan Shorr, however, has a different opinion. Shorr, director of the
Baltimore Literary Heritage Project, remembers that “the American poetry
anthologies used in English classes contain a little Nash poem or two. But
light verse is out of fashion now,” he says. “It was very tasty at the time,
of course, but it’s not really long lasting, not part of today’s literary
style.”
Beyond that, says Shorr, Baltimore does not seem to be especially interested
in its literary history. “Dozens of wonderful writers lived here for most of
their lives— Edith Hamilton, Upton Sinclair, Dashiell Hammett— and we don’t
recognize them at all. The city’s always in the middle of some kind of
crisis, and commemorating authors is very low on the agenda. Those who are
memorialized, it’s usually because they’ve got a wealthy champion, or a
nonprofit dedicated to preserving their memory.”...
Edgar Allan Poe would beg to differ. Baltimore loves him for himself.
The NFL team is named the Ravens. I could go on.

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