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Mart Crowley, 84, groundbreaking gay-themed dramatist (The Boys in the Band)
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That Derek
2020-03-09 03:36:55 UTC
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https://www.broadwayworld.com/article/Playwright-Mart-Crowley-Best-Known-For-THE-BOYS-IN-THE-BAND-Has-Died-at-84-20200308

Playwright Mart Crowley, Best Known For THE BOYS IN THE BAND, Has Died at 84

by BWW News Desk
Mar. 8, 2020

BroadwayWorld is saddened to report that playwright Mart Crowley, best known for writing the play The Boys in the Band, has passed away. He was 84.

The news of Crowley's passing was shared on Twitter by Michael Musto.

Musto said he heard that "Mart had a heart attack, went in for heart surgery, and died a few days after the surgery."

"RIP, Mart Crowley, author of the groundbreaking gay play The Boys in the Band. He was Natalie Wood's assistant and told me she encouraged him to write the play. He nabbed a Tony when the all-star version came to Bway in '18 and the movie version of that will come out this year. pic.twitter.com/ntNF9F5krn
- Michael Musto (@mikeymusto) March 8, 2020

Crowley was born in Vicksburg, Mississippi and educated at The Catholic University of America in Washington D.C. After graduation from the Drama Department he went to New York to pursue a career in the theatre and landed jobs as production assistant to the directors Sidney Lumet and Elia Kazan.

His first play, The Boys in the Band, opened Off-Broadway on April 14, 1968. He wrote the screenplay and produced the film version, directed by Academy Award winner William Friedkin. The 2011 documentary, Making the Boys, explores the genesis of the play and film. The play was revived on Broadway in 2018, and won the Tony Award for Best Play in 2019.

Crowley's other produced plays are Remote Asylum (1970); A Breeze from the Gulf (1973), which earned a Los Angeles Drama Critics Circle nomination for Best Play; Avec Schmaltz (1984), written for the Williamstown Theatre Festival; For Reasons That Remain Unclear (1993), a pre-scandal effort to investigate sexual abuse in the Catholic Church; and The Men from the Boys (2002), a sequel to The Boys in the Band.

From 1979 through 1984 Crowley was the producer/co-writer of the ABC TV series "Hart to Hart." He also wrote several television movies and mini-series. In addition, he is the co-author of the children's book, Kay Thompson's Eloise Takes a Bawth, published by Simon & Schuster (2002). He is the winner of the 2009 Lambda Literary Award for The Collected Plays of Mart Crowley.
Terry del Fuego
2020-03-09 13:30:33 UTC
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On Sun, 8 Mar 2020 20:36:55 -0700 (PDT), That Derek
Post by That Derek
He wrote the screenplay
One entry on my endless list of mental defects is that I can't
encounter the phrase "wrote the screenplay" without mentally saying it
in an "Exorcist" demon voice, thanks to a long ago "National Lampoon
Radio Hour" bit.

So I find it a bit eerie that in my reader, Mart Crowley's entry is
immediately followed by Max von Sydow's.
Bryan Styble
2020-03-09 19:43:04 UTC
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Wikipedia is silent on this decidedly unimportant question, yet I've long been curious about it, so thanks much in advance from an aging (straight) guy who circa 1973 read* [but never saw staged] the play "Boys in the Band":

Anyone know if his given name Mart was short for Martin (or Marty, or something else), or rather perhaps that his folks in Depression-era Vicksburg** just tried "Mart" on their son to be memorably unique?

BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
_______________________________________
* On my own, after having been alerted by Newsweek of the original NYC production; no English class at Lindbergh High School (or any other early '70s St. Louis-area school) was progressive enough to have ASSIGNED it.
** A place that is an absolute must-see for those of us who consider anyone under the misimpression there was one rather than two Battles of Bull Run to be an inexcusably wretched ignoramus [something worse even than a lyin', dog-faced pony soldier!]; though there WAS no Battle of Vicksburg--it was a siege, and a lengthy one, spearheaded by the oh-so-determined future two-term POTUS Grant--Vicksburg DID turn out to be a turning point in the most colossal conflict in Western Hemisphere history (as WELL as in the career of one of the 19th Century's most fascinating politicians), and the striking local Mississippi/Arkansas topography [the town is situated mostly on a towering bluff***] dramatically demonstrates, in ways photos or even footage don't, why Grant had such a tough time prevailing.
***Though nonetheless there IS a riverfront, and down there almost at water level IS a joint called The Highway 61 Coffeehouse--and yeah, I asked the proprietor if his upscale establishment's name was merely some Rand McNally reference to the Delta-blues-evoking U.S. highway nearby, or just PERHAPS in fact was more specifically an allusion to a certain landmark 1965 psychedelic rock album...and to this degenerate Dylanologist's definite delight****, he confirmed the latter.
**** Thusly, this Civil War side-trip on my way back home to Florida more than compensated for yet another mostly lackluster Dylan performance delivered the night before a couple of blocks from the state capitol in Jackson, one of many 2016 stops on the Literature Nobel laureate's fabled global Neverending Tour, which commenced way back on Tuesday, June 7, 1988 in Concord, California***** and shall resume (some 4,000 performances later) next month in Tokyo--coronavirus panic permitting, natch!
***** And yep, this reporter was also there that night in suburban San Francisco, as chronicled online in "Like a Rolling Tombstone" at www.RadioactiveDylan.blogspot.com, as well as in my forthcoming [2021?] tome about that guy with the funny nose, the funnier hair and the funniest voice.
A Friend
2020-03-09 20:20:02 UTC
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Post by Bryan Styble
Wikipedia is silent on this decidedly unimportant question, yet I've long
been curious about it, so thanks much in advance from an aging (straight) guy
Anyone know if his given name Mart was short for Martin (or Marty, or
something else), or rather perhaps that his folks in Depression-era
Vicksburg** just tried "Mart" on their son to be memorably unique?
His full name was Edward Martino Crowley.

https://tinyurl.com/w8uqh58
Bryan Styble
2020-03-09 20:43:51 UTC
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"A Friend" is a[n internet] friend indeed!

A thousand thanks for digging that up!

STYBLE/Florida
Bryan Styble
2020-03-09 23:11:23 UTC
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Uh...I guess I now regret dropping out of the first grade, and thus missing out on such vital second-grade information as the fact that Vicksburg, Mississippi is obviously opposite Louisiana, not Arkansas.

STYBLE/Florida
l***@yahoo.com
2020-03-09 21:38:22 UTC
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When I saw the movie version of "The Boys in the Band" (in 1992) one of my main reactions was: "Since when does any group of adults - or even teens - play a telephone game as immature as THAT?"

Yes, I had a somewhat sheltered childhood.


Lenona
That Derek
2020-03-09 22:33:21 UTC
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UPDAYE: The Boys in the Band (movie version)
Sources: IMdB and Wikipedia

Frederick Combs (Donald), 10/11/1935–09/19/1992 (AIDS-related illness)

Leonard Frey (Harold), 09/04/1938–08/24/1988 (AIDS-related illness)

Cliff Gorman (Emory), 10/13/1936–09/05/2002 (leukaemia)

Reuben Greene (Bernard), born 11/24/1938

Robert La Tourneaux (Cowboy Tex), 11/22/1941–06/03/1986 (AIDS; fought off landlord who attempted to evict him based on diagnosis; cared for by Cliff Gorman and Gorman's wife)

Laurence Luckinbill (Hank), born 11/21/1934, still married to Lucie Arnaz)

Kenneth Nelson (Michael), 03/24/1930–10/07/1993 (AIDS-related complications)

Keith Prentice (Larry), 02/21/1940–09/27/1992 (AIDS-related cancer)

Peter White (Alan), born 10/10/1937
Louis Epstein
2020-03-10 00:00:33 UTC
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Post by That Derek
UPDAYE: The Boys in the Band (movie version)
Sources: IMdB and Wikipedia
Frederick Combs (Donald), 10/11/1935?09/19/1992 (AIDS-related illness)
Leonard Frey (Harold), 09/04/1938?08/24/1988 (AIDS-related illness)
Cliff Gorman (Emory), 10/13/1936?09/05/2002 (leukaemia)
Reuben Greene (Bernard), born 11/24/1938
Robert La Tourneaux (Cowboy Tex), 11/22/1941?06/03/1986 (AIDS; fought off landlord who attempted to evict him based on diagnosis; cared for by Cliff Gorman and Gorman's wife)
Laurence Luckinbill (Hank), born 11/21/1934, still married to Lucie Arnaz)
Kenneth Nelson (Michael), 03/24/1930?10/07/1993 (AIDS-related complications)
Keith Prentice (Larry), 02/21/1940?09/27/1992 (AIDS-related cancer)
Peter White (Alan), born 10/10/1937
Plainly one has a high risk of catching AIDS if one appears in this film.

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.

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