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OT: The US reached the mark of...
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Lenona
2021-09-10 20:31:26 UTC
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...333,333,333, or one-third of a billion people, according to Worldometers, at 1:28 p.m., ET, on Sept. 9th, 2021.

Just in case anyone wants to know.
A Friend
2021-09-10 21:16:03 UTC
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Post by Lenona
...333,333,333, or one-third of a billion people, according to Worldometers,
at 1:28 p.m., ET, on Sept. 9th, 2021.
Just in case anyone wants to know.
The U.S. pavilion at the New York World's Fair (1964-65) had a
population clock, and it was a big deal when it crossed 200 million
during the second year of the fair. Some worried that the country
would fall apart by the end of the 20th century, because they expected
the population to have doubled. Cf. the film Soylent Green, set in a
dystopic 2022. (The book had been set in 1999.)
radioacti...@gmail.com
2021-09-11 03:06:04 UTC
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Boy howdy!

Like you, Sir or Madam "Friend", I too saw that huge digital readout--although at the age of 9 I would not have phrased it with those words--late on the afternoon of Wednesday, August 12, 1964*, but had long since FORGOTTEN about that particular exhibit!

(Now, there was no forgettin' Michelango's mother&Son marble masterwork--flown in from Rome to constitute the sole, bathed-in-blue-spotlights display in The Vatican pavilion--but we had to watch intently, as the conveyor belt whisked us by it somewhat rapidly.)

Anyway, thanks much for reviving that population-counter memory, unseen Friend.

And of course thanks AS WELL to good ol' Dad and Mom...for trundling their two sons (including their younger, blond and bratty one) all the way to Fun City for the World's Fair That Robert Moses Built.

Just as the 1939-40 fair--staged on the same Flushing Meadows Park site just south of Shea Stadium in Queens--inspired pre-War youngsters to imagine the rest of the 20th.Century, so did my clan's visit from suburban St. Louis get me to thinking about the future in ways previously only The Jetsons had.

As a first grader, I had badgered my patient parents with going to Seattle for this so-called Century 21 Exposition. I liked the entire idea of it from the magazine pieces--in Popular Mechanics and elsewhere--I had seen, but The Space Needle especially fascinated me. But as our family tour out West back in 1960 took us through the Pacific Northwest, Mom vetoed my Seattle idea.

But I like to think my disappointment with never seeing The Space Needle during that 1962 summer** is what kinda, sorta nudged my wonderful late parents two years later into letting me behold the magnificent Unisphere--and every other marvelous memory from there--during that summer of 2021, I mean 1964 !

BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
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* As it happens, the date Ian Fleming died in the U.K.
** Of course, I never imagined back then that DURING that afore-imagined 21st Century I would eventually*** so improbably come to be professionally propagating conversation at the speed of light as the overnight call-in yakker at KIRO/Seattle, the most prestigious commercial newstalk radio outlet west of Chicago and north of San Francisco, doin' my in-your-ear talk radio schtick from studios a mere mile east of the landmark I have always considered pretty much the most inspiring structure anywhere. (And a three-foot wooden model**** of which decorates my condo's great room here in this state occupying the opposite corner of The Lower 48.)
*** 2005-2008.
**** Painted in its original 1962 color scheme of Orbital Olive [shaft], Weightless White [struts], Reentry Red [crown undercarriage] and Galaxy Gold [crown], natch' !
A Friend
2021-09-11 05:48:52 UTC
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Post by ***@gmail.com
Just as the 1939-40 fair--staged on the same Flushing Meadows Park site just
south of Shea Stadium in Queens--inspired pre-War youngsters to imagine the
rest of the 20th.Century, so did my clan's visit from suburban St. Louis get
me to thinking about the future in ways previously only The Jetsons had.
I did a piece for someone not too long ago about the 1964-65 fair and
its depiction of the future, which of course included a moon colony,
underground homes, and common supersonic travel, and pointed out that
the only thing I saw at the fair that came to matter was a computer
chip. Someone (Westinghouse? GE?) had one in a little display with a
magnifying lens over it. I looked at it with absolutely no idea how
important, and common, they would become. The idea that people would
commonly have computers in their homes probably would have been laughed
out of town on opening night.

The future was always about bigger TVs, going to the moon, and maybe
living underwater.
Meteorite Debris
2021-09-11 07:39:57 UTC
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Post by Lenona
...333,333,333, or one-third of a billion people, according to Worldometers, at 1:28 p.m., ET, on Sept. 9th, 2021.
Just in case anyone wants to know.
A half of Satan's number X 1 million. An evangelical might say it's time for a thousand time gross Jewish virgin males to press the reset button. But I digress as an atheist.
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