Discussion:
"Pregnancy Is Not Supposed to Kill Us, Yet I Almost Died — Twice."
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Lenona
2021-10-12 19:47:06 UTC
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https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/pregnancy-not-supposed-kill-us-205200315.html

By Elissa Garay.

Comments, from elsewhere:

Cambion:
"People don't realize how dangerous even a healthy/normal pregnancy can be. There's a reason it was the main cause of death in women for a long damn time - it's not as natural and beautiful as modern women make it out to be and I'm convinced the ones who lived through it a long time ago were just super lucky.

"Something I read recently suggested that the uterus is not a way to protect the fetus from outside harm - it's a way to contain the fetus to protect the woman from it. A pregnancy can change a woman on a genetic level when fetal cells cross the placental barrier and bury themselves in the woman's tissues. Conditions like ecclampsia and pre-ecclampsia can kill the woman. Things like hyperemesis gravidarum can become life-threatening if the woman is so sick that she can't keep down water.

"Even when the woman stops being pregnant either due to giving birth or miscarrying, shit can go south. Like the article says, blood clots are a post-natal issue, and I also learned recently that it's possible to develop ecclampsia/pre-ecclampsia after giving birth too. If a woman miscarries and even the tiniest scrap of fetal tissue remains in her uterus after her body decides it is done being pregnant, she can go septic. Ectopic pregnancies can cause life-threatening bleeding if they go untreated.

"The fact that more women are getting pregnant later in life and/or when they're very obese is not going to do anyone any favors either because both these things greatly increase the risk of complications and death...."


Kman:
"Before modern medicine, from my reading it looks as if childbirth was an even bigger killer than the actual pregnancy, which was obviously very risky by itself. Women dying during or soon after childbirth were not unusual, because lots can go wrong then. Sepsis and infections after birth were largely untreatable before antibiotics.

"Sepsis (blood infection) can kill even with antibiotics today. Ask me how I know. I've had it and it almost took me out in 2015.

"Pregnancy and childbirth might not be "supposed" to kill someone, but historically they sure were risky as hell. A lot of people don't study history and have no idea how bad many things used to be."
Terry del Fuego
2021-10-13 14:54:39 UTC
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Post by Lenona
"People don't realize how dangerous even a healthy/normal pregnancy can be.
But it's all worth it if even one kid gets to suffer in an
overcrowded, overheated, ignorant world veering headlong into
totalitarianism.
Kenny McCormack
2021-10-13 23:52:00 UTC
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Post by Terry del Fuego
Post by Lenona
"People don't realize how dangerous even a healthy/normal pregnancy can be.
But it's all worth it if even one kid gets to suffer in an
overcrowded, overheated, ignorant world veering headlong into
totalitarianism.
Yeah! That's the spirit.

As you've said before, it's gonna be really bad for the last generation of
economic Ponzi scheme.
--
Faith doesn't give you the answers; it just stops you from asking the questions.
J.D. Baldwin
2021-10-15 18:39:25 UTC
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Post by Lenona
"People don't realize how dangerous even a healthy/normal pregnancy
can be. There's a reason it was the main cause of death in women for
a long damn time - it's not as natural and beautiful as modern women
make it out to be and I'm convinced the ones who lived through it a
long time ago were just super lucky.
I don't know about "super lucky." Even 500 years ago, the normal mode
of things was for mothers to survive childbirth just fine. But
certainly the morbidity and mortality rates were much, much higher
before modern medicine. And the experience was probably generally
more unpleasant before Demerol, epidurals, etc. came along.

For a time in the 1800s, maternal mortality *in hospital settings* was
atrociously high -- perhaps 10% overall, with some hospitals reporting
40% maternal mortality in some years. Then, as today, hospitals and
doctors directly caused a great many deaths by spreading infection. A
mother in 1850 in the U.S. or Europe would be better off delivering at
home with the help of family members rather than going to a hospital.
--
_+_ From the catapult of |If anyone objects to any statement I make, I am
_|70|___:)=}- J.D. Baldwin |quite prepared not only to retract it, but also
\ / ***@panix.com|to deny under oath that I ever made it.-T. Lehrer
***~~~~----------------------------------------------------------------------
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