Discussion:
"No One Told Babe Ruth He Had Cancer, but..."
Add Reply
l***@yahoo.com
2020-01-03 20:30:30 UTC
Reply
Permalink
"...His Death Changed the Way We Fight It."

(He died in 1948.)

https://getpocket.com/explore/item/no-one-told-babe-ruth-he-had-cancer-but-his-death-changed-the-way-we-fight-it?utm_source=pocket-newtab

Popular Science

By Eleanor Cummins


Excerpt:

...While it seems possible that no one ever told Ruth himself, the baseball legend had terminal cancer. A tumor had grown from behind his nose to the base of his skull and was working its way into his neck. Treatment would be harrowing, but his doctors were determined the Sultan of Swat would get better. Though their effort to save him was ultimately unsuccessful, the record-setting Ruth became a cancer pioneer in the process.

At the time of Ruth's birth on February 6, 1895, cancer, once a rarity, was suddenly everywhere. "He lived at a time when cancer rates were increasing markedly," says Dr. Otis Brawley, Chief Medical Officer for the American Cancer Society. These days, Brawley says, we know what to attribute that to: smoking and air pollution. At the time, however, no one actually knew what caused cancer, let alone how to cure it.

Until the late 19th century, many scientists subscribed to the humoral theory of disease, which states that imbalances in blood, phlegm, and two types of bile caused all matter of illness. Others believed cancer, like tuberculosis, was contagious. And as late as the 1920s, some physicians subscribed to the notion that physical trauma caused tumors. This last theory persisted despite all evidence; scientists methodically injured lab animals aplenty and yet no new cancers grew.

Treatments were similarly brutish...

(snip)



Lenona.
A Friend
2020-01-03 23:09:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by l***@yahoo.com
"...His Death Changed the Way We Fight It."
(He died in 1948.)
https://getpocket.com/explore/item/no-one-told-babe-ruth-he-had-cancer-but-his-
death-changed-the-way-we-fight-it?utm_source=pocket-newtab
Popular Science
By Eleanor Cummins
...While it seems possible that no one ever told Ruth himself, the baseball
legend had terminal cancer. A tumor had grown from behind his nose to the
base of his skull and was working its way into his neck. Treatment would be
harrowing, but his doctors were determined the Sultan of Swat would get
better. Though their effort to save him was ultimately unsuccessful, the
record-setting Ruth became a cancer pioneer in the process.
At the time of Ruth's birth on February 6, 1895, cancer, once a rarity, was
suddenly everywhere. "He lived at a time when cancer rates were increasing
markedly," says Dr. Otis Brawley, Chief Medical Officer for the American
smoking and air pollution. At the time, however, no one actually knew what
caused cancer, let alone how to cure it.
Until the late 19th century, many scientists subscribed to the humoral theory
of disease, which states that imbalances in blood, phlegm, and two types of
bile caused all matter of illness. Others believed cancer, like tuberculosis,
was contagious. And as late as the 1920s, some physicians subscribed to the
notion that physical trauma caused tumors. This last theory persisted despite
all evidence; scientists methodically injured lab animals aplenty and yet no
new cancers grew.
Treatments were similarly brutish...
(snip)
Lenona.
I thought the Babe was aware of his diagnosis, since the William Bendix
biopic has him saying how he's going to go through treatment so he can
help save other people, etc. Babe Ruth was still alive when the movie
came out, and I think he even attended the premiere.
MJ Emigh
2020-01-04 03:11:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by A Friend
I thought the Babe was aware of his diagnosis, since the William Bendix
biopic has him saying how he's going to go through treatment so he can
help save other people, etc.
There's not a whole lot of fact in the film. Never let the truth get in the way of a good story. I, too, thought he was aware of it. I've got about 20 books about Babe so I'll try to look it up tomorrow. You'd think I should be able to confirm or dispute it easily, but at this point in life, memory is not my strongest brain partner. Sounds like a lot of books, I know, but it's nowhere near the number of Mickey Mantle books that currently cover almost three shelves.
A Friend
2020-01-04 12:15:24 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by MJ Emigh
Post by A Friend
I thought the Babe was aware of his diagnosis, since the William Bendix
biopic has him saying how he's going to go through treatment so he can
help save other people, etc.
There's not a whole lot of fact in the film. Never let the truth get
in the way of a good story. I, too, thought he was aware of it. I've
got about 20 books about Babe so I'll try to look it up tomorrow.
You'd think I should be able to confirm or dispute it easily, but at
this point in life, memory is not my strongest brain partner. Sounds
like a lot of books, I know, but it's nowhere near the number of
Mickey Mantle books that currently cover almost three shelves.
Thanks. I did find a reference to the Babe having been at the
premiere. It's said to have been his final public appearance. (IMDb
says the film debuted three days earlier, though.)

https://www.barstoolsports.com/newyork/on-this-date-in-sports-july-29-19
48-the-babe-ruth-story

Loading...