Discussion:
Joyce Williams Warren, 82, in Dec. 2017 (author: "Fanny Fern: An Independent Woman," 1992)
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l***@yahoo.com
2019-04-02 20:57:04 UTC
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A former librarian and college professor, she lived in Roslyn Heights, New York.

(Not to be confused with the 69-year-old Arkansas judge, Joyce Elise Williams Warren.)


https://www.legacy.com/obituaries/newsday/obituary.aspx?pid=188215125

Middle third:

"...She received her BA and MA from Brown University and her PhD from Columbia University. She was a Professor of English and Director of Women's Studies at Queens College, CUNY, and the author of The American Narcissus; Fanny Fern: An Independent Woman; and Women, Money, and the Law, as well as the children's book A Mouse to Be Free. An inspiring teacher, she loved her teaching and her students, and helped lead her community, ranging from her service on the library board to her activism on behalf of the environment and the neighborhood..."




She was best known for her writings on 19th-century women writers - including Fanny Fern.

About that book, from Goodreads:

"Fanny Fern is a name that is unfamiliar to most contemporary readers. In this first modern biography, Warren revives the reputation of a once-popular 19th-century newspaper columnist and novelist. Fern, the pseudonym for Sara Payson Willis Parton, was born in 1811 and grew up in a society with strictly defined gender roles. From her rebellious childhood to her adult years as a newspaper columnist, Fern challenged society's definition of women's place with her life and her words. Fern wrote a weekly newspaper column for 21 years and, using colorful language and satirical style, advocated women's rights and called for social reform. Warren blends Fern's life story with an analysis of the social and literary world of 19th-century America."

Amazon has many reviews of "A Mouse to be Free" - almost all are from the last 8 years!

"...about a mouse washed down a storm drain, down a river, and into the life of a little girl could have been merely quaint and cute, but the lesson the girl learns from the mouse makes it much, much more.

"After rescuing the mouse--found floating down the river is a waterlogged matchbox--the little girl gives it food and a safe home, but at the cost of its freedom. (Hence, the title.) Safe, warm, and fed, the mouse's obvious misery at his condition teaches the girl a valuable lesson about freedom and its costs--a lesson many adults could stand to learn as well..."

https://www.google.com/search?q=Joyce+Warren+books&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwie_-SGpbLhAhVFTd8KHe05B_wQ_AUIECgD&biw=1920&bih=929
(book covers)

https://www.google.com/search?ei=XcujXNaHJKGHggfXyZ7oBQ&q=Joyce+Warren+kirkus&oq=Joyce+Warren+kirkus&gs_l=psy-ab.3..33i160l2.2374.3711..3902...0.0..0.123.635.5j2......0....1..gws-wiz.......0j0i22i30j33i22i29i30.DxPn-HqHk0k
(Kirkus reviews)

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/339440.Joyce_W_Warren
(reader reviews)

http://www.worldcat.org/identities/lccn-n83168319/
(book synopses)

https://qccommunity.qc.cuny.edu/pages/funds/joyce-warren
(about the scholarship in her name)


WRITINGS (under Joyce W. Warren):

A Mouse to Be Free (juvenile), Sea Cliff Press, 1973.

(Editor and author of introduction) Fanny Fern, Ruth Hall and Other Writings, Rutgers University Press (New Brunwick, NJ), 1986.
The American Narcissus: Individualism and Women in Nineteenth-Century American Fiction, Rutgers University Press (New Brunswick, NJ), 1984.

Fanny Fern: An Independent Woman, Rutgers University Press (New Brunswick, NJ), 1992.
(Editor) The (Other) American Traditions: Nineteenth-Century Women Writers, Rutgers University Press (New Brunswick, NJ), 1993.

(Editor with Margaret Dickie) Challenging Boundaries: Gender and Periodization, University of Georgia Press (Athens, GA), 2000.



Lenona.
l***@yahoo.com
2019-04-03 14:51:09 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
She was best known for her writings on 19th-century women writers - including Fanny Fern.
"Fanny Fern is a name that is unfamiliar to most contemporary readers. In this first modern biography, Warren revives the reputation of a once-popular 19th-century newspaper columnist and novelist. Fern, the pseudonym for Sara Payson Willis Parton, was born in 1811 and grew up in a society with strictly defined gender roles. From her rebellious childhood to her adult years as a newspaper columnist, Fern challenged society's definition of women's place with her life and her words. Fern wrote a weekly newspaper column for 21 years and, using colorful language and satirical style, advocated women's rights and called for social reform. Warren blends Fern's life story with an analysis of the social and literary world of 19th-century America."
More on Fanny Fern (her best-known book was "Ruth Hall"):


https://groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/rec.arts.books.childrens/%22ruth$20hall%22%7Csort:date/rec.arts.books.childrens/oTo6O53LGWs/71hR7whaw1wJ
(about Fern's 200th anniversary)

Excerpt:

I kept trying to find a quote of (Fern's) and found it in a book I could
have sworn I hadn't already read. It's "Ginger-Snaps" and the piece is
"Dinner Parties." Here's the 7th and last page of that piece:

"I lately read an article in a London paper, in which 'the woman-
question' was treated in the following enlightened manner: The
writer avowed his dislike to the cultivation of woman's intellect;
since men had enough intellect, in their intercourse with each other;
and wanted only with woman that charming, childish prattle and
playfulness, which was so refreshing to the male creature, when he
needed relief and amusement!

"The author of these advanced ideas didn't state whether he considered
these *childish*, *prattling* women fit to be mothers and heads of
families; probably that was too puerile a question to consider in the
same breath with the amusement they might afford men by the total
absence of intelligence."

(She DID say something similar in her piece "Shall Women Vote?," in
reference to Mr. Tulliver, from George Eliot's "The Mill on the Floss,"
who marries a fool so he can be the boss, only to find his son had
inherited his mother's weak brain.)



Lenona.

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