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Charles Shields, 75, in Jan. (illustrated "Even Cowgirls Get the Blues" & "Rolling Stone")
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l***@yahoo.com
2020-06-25 19:22:37 UTC
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Not to be confused with the 68-year-old Charles J. Shields, biographer of Harper Lee, Kurt Vonnegut, and Roald Dahl. (Unfortunately, I suspect that more than one person who wrote about him did just that, since the only New York Times award that I could find seems to refer to a book by the living Shields - which has no drawings!)

https://fresnostatecah.com/2020/02/03/professor-emeritus-charles-shields-passes-away-at-75/

"Charles Shields was born on July 19, 1944, and passed away peacefully at home on Thursday, January 30, 2020.

"Charles grew up in Hawthorne, CA. He lived in Boulder, Oakland, and Los Angeles before settling in Fresno. There he owned Shields Design and, as a full professor, helped develop the BFA Graphic Design Program at California State University, Fresno before retiring in 2016.

"Charles received his BFA and MFA from the Art Center College of Design. His professional work comprises many diverse projects including illustrating a cover for Rolling Stone magazine, illustrating a book that received the New York Times 'Children’s Book of the Year' award and designing props for a Steven Spielberg movie.

"Charles won numerous awards from many sources, including the Society of Illustrators of New York, the Society of Illustrators of Los Angeles, the Art Directors Club of New York, the American Institute of Graphic Arts, the American Graphic Design Awards, the American Advertising Awards, the Summit Awards, the Clio Awards, and a Silver Medal, Lifetime Achievement award from the American Advertising Federation. His work has been recognized in Communication Arts magazine and exhibited in New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Hong Kong. He has been published in more than 60 books in the U.S., Japan, China, and Germany.

"He is survived by his family who he called “the joy of my life:” wife, Amporn, of 20 years, son Lucas and daughter Anya. He is preceded in death by his parents Charles and Eloise Shields.

"Private services will be held. A celebration of life gathering will be announced at a later date."


https://fresnostatecah.com/2017/09/14/art-notes-curiosity-by-charles-shields-at-phebe-conley-art-gallery/
(a 2017 art exhibit at Fresno State, California, with one B&W drawing)

Most of it:

"...This retrospective consists of works beginning from Shields’s student work in the 1960s and spanning across his professional career up until the 1990s.

"The majority of the gallery space is filled with his 1970s pieces but one of the highlights in the exhibit is his display of logos he designed, which includes that of the Chaffee Zoo.

"Stephanie Wong, Jennifer Runyon and Duran Hernandez, who were hired by Shields, collaborated in the selection and curation of his artwork. In addition, they decided to include a 'Message Wall,' where visitors are encouraged to write a short message to Shields where they can then be hung on this wall for everyone to view.

"Shields received his BFA and MFA from the Art Center College of Design. His professional work comprises many diverse projects including illustrating a cover for Rolling Stone magazine, illustrating a book that received the New York Times Children’s Book of the Year award, and designing props for a Steven Spielberg motion picture.

"Shields has won numerous awards from many sources, including: the Society of Illustrators of New York, the Society of Illustrators of Los Angeles, the Art Directors Club of New York, the American Institute of Graphic Arts, the American Graphic Design Awards, the American Advertising Awards, the Summit Awards, the Clio Awards and a Silver Medal, Lifetime Achievement award from the American Advertising Federation.

"His work has been recognized in Print and Communication Arts magazines and exhibited in New York, San Francisco, Los Angeles and Hong Kong. He has been published in more than 60 books in the U.S., Japan, China and Germany..."


I'm having trouble finding his complete bibliography.

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=3054631184&searchurl=kn%3DShields%26sortby%3D17%26tn%3DSwitch%2Bbitch&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp1-_-image6#&gid=1&pid=1
(1974 cover of "Switch Bitch" by Roald Dahl)

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=7778778710&searchurl=kn%3DShields%26sortby%3D17%26tn%3DCowgirls%2Bblues&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp1-_-image1#&gid=1&pid=1
(cover of "Even Cowgirls Get the Blues," by Tom Robbins, 1976 - not the cover with the goat)

https://www.abebooks.com/servlet/BookDetailsPL?bi=15537049157&searchurl=an%3DCharles%2Bshields%26kn%3DIllustrated%26sortby%3D17&cm_sp=snippet-_-srp1-_-image9#&gid=1&pid=1
(cover of "Dragon, Dragon and Other Tales" by John Gardner, 1976)

https://fontsinuse.com/uses/22578/women-of-wonder-series-vintage-books
(cover of "Women of Wonder: Science-fiction Stories by Women about Women" which, according to Wikipedia, was "edited by Pamela Sargent, first published in 1975. It also includes an introduction and notes before each story by Sargent." Plus the covers of "More Women of Wonder," 1976, and "The New Women of Wonder," 1978)

https://www.blackgate.com/2015/10/10/vintage-treasures-pamela-sargents-women-of-wonder/
(This includes the later editions, which Shields apparently didn't work on, when I looked at the back covers)

https://www.ratemyprofessors.com/ShowRatings.jsp?tid=721843
(Old ratings from his students)

https://fineartamerica.com/featured/rolling-stone-cover-volume-143-9-13-1973-senator-sam-ervin.html
(1973 "Rolling Stone" cover, featuring Senator Sam Ervin)

From Wikipedia:

"Samuel James 'Sam' Ervin Jr. (September 27, 1896 – April 23, 1985) was an American politician. A Democrat, he served as a U.S. Senator from North Carolina from 1954 to 1974. A native of Morganton, he liked to call himself a 'country lawyer', and often told humorous stories in his Southern drawl. During his Senate career, Ervin was a legal defender of the Jim Crow laws and racial segregation, as the South's constitutional expert during the congressional debates on civil rights. Unexpectedly, he became a liberal hero for his support of civil liberties. He is remembered for his work in the investigation committees that brought down Senator Joseph McCarthy in 1954 and especially for his investigation of the Watergate scandal in 1972 that led to the resignation of Richard Nixon."



Lenona.
l***@yahoo.com
2020-06-25 19:49:44 UTC
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Reader reviews:

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1416758.Dragon_Dragon_and_Other_Tales?from_search=true&from_srp=true&qid=UIeEgYA00E&rank=1

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/2211959.Women_of_Wonder

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1893086.More_Women_of_Wonder

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/555910.The_New_Women_of_Wonder

https://www.kirkusreviews.com/book-reviews/john-gardner/dragon-dragon-and-other-tales/?page=59
(Kirkus review of "Dragon, Dragon")

"Four playful changes on traditional fairy tale themes, a bit thinner than we'd expect from the author of Grendel and occasionally descending to the level of adult archness ('Only the prince. . . remembered Chimarra's saying 'We have nothing to fear but fear itself [or something]'), but disarmingly witty and polished. In the title story (the most entertaining, with the Queen turning into a rose bush and the would-be hero selling brushes to the dragon), a cobbler's third son wins half a kingdom and rescues his less obedient older brothers simply by following his father's seemingly foolish advice—but in 'The Miller's Mule' the advice-giving animal (an invariably benign agent of deliverance in folklore) is a malicious plotter bent on his hero's destruction. Elsewhere a timid tailor brings down the giant in spite of himself when he becomes so preoccupied with determining his guilt that he forgets his fear, and, in the mildly satirical "Last Piece of Light" where the people shrug off the growing darkness and the politicians furiously deny it, a Cinderella type saves the world (belatedly, though, for she forgets the magic spell for a number of gloomy years) from an old man who is stealing ail the light so that he can take over. A sparkle for classroom or family aloud."
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