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Doris Day, romantic cinematic and sonic icon, 97
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Bryan Styble
2019-05-13 13:47:51 UTC
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MSNBC, The Drudge Report and others are reporting her demise.

At least from this always-biased perspective, they seldom comes bigger than this one.

BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
Bryan Styble
2019-05-13 14:11:07 UTC
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Uh, that "comes" was a knuckleheaded typo, not a dialect approximation!

And I suppose I should have added some reference to her dancing skills in the head, especially how seldom they were drawn upon in her later films. In a bunch of the early musicals she made with the likes of Jack Carson and Dennis Morgan, in between songs Day moved her legs with remarkable speed and fluidity...and I believe--though I may have the sequence wrong here--this was after her unfortunate auto ax which seriously injured her gams back in hometown Cincinnati!

STYBLE/Florida
Michael OConnor
2019-05-13 16:07:49 UTC
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Apparently, some nitwit edited her Wikipedia page moments after her death was announced and put some sort of disturbing picture up there, which was on there for a few minutes before it was taken down. They aren't saying what the picture was.

Sorry to hear about her passing. She was America's Sweetheart in the 1950's, with her wholesome film roles. I doubt she could have made it as a serious dramatic actress, but she was very successful in her romantic comedies.

I always admired her for her longtime philanthropic work with animals.
d***@gmail.com
2019-05-13 17:56:06 UTC
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Her pet rescue work made her AWESOME!

Thank you for all you’ve done.
Terry del Fuego
2019-05-13 18:32:06 UTC
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On Mon, 13 May 2019 09:07:49 -0700 (PDT), Michael OConnor
Post by Michael OConnor
I doubt she could have made it as a serious dramatic actress
Check out "Storm Warning" from 1951. For some reason, it has a
ridiculous take on the Klan, but as drama it's great.
melbedewy
2019-05-13 18:13:58 UTC
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Post by Bryan Styble
MSNBC, The Drudge Report and others are reporting her demise.
At least from this always-biased perspective, they seldom comes bigger than this one.
BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
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Doris Day 1922-2019
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me (melbedewy change)
2:12 PM (less than a minute ago)
An instant star in the 40's with Les Brown and His Band of Renown she is, I believe the last headliner from the original Big Band era.
All that's left is sidemen like Ray Anthony (also 97) and even more obscure sidemen.
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/may/13/calamity-jane-star-doris-day-dies-at-97



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Doris Day, circa 1962.
Doris Day, circa 1962. Photograph: Archive Photos/Getty Images

Doris Day, the actor, singer and animal welfare activist, has died at the age of 97. The Doris Day Animal Foundation confirmed the news.

Born Doris Mary Ann Kappelhoff in Cincinnati, Ohio, Day was known for a string of successful musicals and romantic comedies, including Pillow Talk, as well as a singing career that encompassed 29 studio albums.
Calamity Jane review – hugely enjoyable proto-lesbian musical
5 out of 5 stars.
Read more

Descended from German immigrants to the US, Day first gained fame with a recording of Sentimental Journey on 1945 as a vocalist for Les Brown and His Band of Renown; the song became a popular second world war anthem, and by 1946 she was the highest paid female singer in the world.

Her film career started with a role in the 1948 musical comedy Romance on the High Seas, which she secured after Betty Hutton dropped out due to pregnancy. Day proved a hit with audiences, specialising in musical comedy roles, including My Dream is Yours, Tea for Two and I’ll See You in My Dreams. In 1953, she took on the title role of the hit film Calamity Jane, a major hit which later turned into both a stage musical and a TV show.
Major role ... Day in Calamity Jane
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Major role ... Day in Calamity Jane. Photograph: Everett/Rex/Shutterstock

Day engineered a career change shortly afterwards, declining to renew her contract with Warner Bros with the intention of branching out. Her breakthrough role came opposite James Cagney in the musical Love Me or Leave Me, in which she played real-life singer Ruth Etting. Day herself believed it to be her best performance.
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Day followed it up with roles in Alfred Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much and the poorly received thriller Julie. The disappointing results of the latter film prompted her to return to comedy, and she secured an Oscar nomination for her role alongside Rock Hudson in 1959 romantic comedy Pillow Talk. This inaugurated a successful period at the box office for Day, which included That Touch of Mink with Cary Grant, The Thrill of It All opposite James Garner, and Move Over, Darling, which had originally been conceived as Something’s Got to Give, a comeback vehicle for Marilyn Monroe.
Big box office ... Day with James Garner in Move Over, Darling
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Big box office ... Day with James Garner in Move Over, Darling. Photograph: Allstar/20th Century Fox/Sportsphoto Ltd./Allstar

However, Day’s perky style did not survive America’s mid-60s social upheaval, and her popularity swiftly declined in the counterculture era. Day’s film career tailed off with her last film, With Six You Get Eggroll, in 1968; she then moved to the small screen with The Doris Day Show, albeit with reluctance after she discovered she owed large debts after her husband Marty Melcher died in 1968. The show ran for five years; after the final season in 1973, she largely retired and put her efforts into animal welfare activism. She started Doris Day Animal Foundation, a non-profit which aimed at helping animals across the US.

Day was married four times, to musicians Al Jorden (1941-43) and George Weidler (1946-49), agent and producer Melcher (1951-68) and restaurateur Barry Comden (1976-81). With her first husband she had her only child, record producer Terry Melcher, who died in 2004. Day received the the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2004.

Tributes for the actor have poured in from Hollywood with Goldie Hawn tweeting that Day will has taken “a piece of the sun with her” and Tony Bennett writing that he is “saddened” by the death of “a wonderful friend”.

“One of my all time favourite stars has joined the heavenly choir,” tweeted Elaine Paige. Rest in Peace the great & inimitable Doris Day. The last star of the Hollywood Golden Age. We’ll bid you farewell by the Light of The Silvery Moon, but you will always be Young at Heart to us forever.”

On Instagram, Sarah Jessica Parker shared a tribute, writing “I love you. Millions did and do. Godspeed” while William Shatner tweeted that she was “the World’s Sweetheart and beloved by all”.

“So sad to hear of Doris Day passing away,” Paul McCartney wrote on his personal blog. “She was a true star in more ways than one. I had the privilege of hanging out with her on a few occasions. Visiting her in her Californian home was like going to an animal sanctuary where her many dogs were taken care of in splendid style. She had a heart of gold and was a very funny lady who I shared many laughs with.
Bermuda999
2019-05-13 23:12:14 UTC
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Post by melbedewy
2:12 PM (less than a minute ago)
An instant star in the 40's with Les Brown and His Band of Renown she is, I believe the last headliner from the original Big Band era.
All that's left is sidemen like Ray Anthony (also 97) and even more obscure sidemen.
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/may/13/calamity-jane-star-doris-day-dies-at-97
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395
Doris Day, circa 1962.
Doris Day, circa 1962. Photograph: Archive Photos/Getty Images
Doris Day, the actor, singer and animal welfare activist, has died at the age of 97. The Doris Day Animal Foundation confirmed the news.
Born Doris Mary Ann Kappelhoff in Cincinnati, Ohio, Day was known for a string of successful musicals and romantic comedies, including Pillow Talk, as well as a singing career that encompassed 29 studio albums.
Calamity Jane review – hugely enjoyable proto-lesbian musical
5 out of 5 stars.
Read more
Descended from German immigrants to the US, Day first gained fame with a recording of Sentimental Journey on 1945 as a vocalist for Les Brown and His Band of Renown; the song became a popular second world war anthem, and by 1946 she was the highest paid female singer in the world.
Her film career started with a role in the 1948 musical comedy Romance on the High Seas, which she secured after Betty Hutton dropped out due to pregnancy. Day proved a hit with audiences, specialising in musical comedy roles, including My Dream is Yours, Tea for Two and I’ll See You in My Dreams. In 1953, she took on the title role of the hit film Calamity Jane, a major hit which later turned into both a stage musical and a TV show.
Major role ... Day in Calamity Jane
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Twitter
Pinterest
Major role ... Day in Calamity Jane. Photograph: Everett/Rex/Shutterstock
Day engineered a career change shortly afterwards, declining to renew her contract with Warner Bros with the intention of branching out. Her breakthrough role came opposite James Cagney in the musical Love Me or Leave Me, in which she played real-life singer Ruth Etting. Day herself believed it to be her best performance.
Advertisement
Day followed it up with roles in Alfred Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much and the poorly received thriller Julie. The disappointing results of the latter film prompted her to return to comedy, and she secured an Oscar nomination for her role alongside Rock Hudson in 1959 romantic comedy Pillow Talk. This inaugurated a successful period at the box office for Day, which included That Touch of Mink with Cary Grant, The Thrill of It All opposite James Garner, and Move Over, Darling, which had originally been conceived as Something’s Got to Give, a comeback vehicle for Marilyn Monroe.
Big box office ... Day with James Garner in Move Over, Darling
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Twitter
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Big box office ... Day with James Garner in Move Over, Darling. Photograph: Allstar/20th Century Fox/Sportsphoto Ltd./Allstar
However, Day’s perky style did not survive America’s mid-60s social upheaval, and her popularity swiftly declined in the counterculture era. Day’s film career tailed off with her last film, With Six You Get Eggroll, in 1968; she then moved to the small screen with The Doris Day Show, albeit with reluctance after she discovered she owed large debts after her husband Marty Melcher died in 1968. The show ran for five years; after the final season in 1973, she largely retired and put her efforts into animal welfare activism. She started Doris Day Animal Foundation, a non-profit which aimed at helping animals across the US.
Day was married four times, to musicians Al Jorden (1941-43) and George Weidler (1946-49), agent and producer Melcher (1951-68) and restaurateur Barry Comden (1976-81). With her first husband she had her only child, record producer Terry Melcher, who died in 2004. Day received the the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2004.
Tributes for the actor have poured in from Hollywood with Goldie Hawn tweeting that Day will has taken “a piece of the sun with her” and Tony Bennett writing that he is “saddened” by the death of “a wonderful friend”.
“One of my all time favourite stars has joined the heavenly choir,” tweeted Elaine Paige. Rest in Peace the great & inimitable Doris Day. The last star of the Hollywood Golden Age. We’ll bid you farewell by the Light of The Silvery Moon, but you will always be Young at Heart to us forever.”
On Instagram, Sarah Jessica Parker shared a tribute, writing “I love you. Millions did and do. Godspeed” while William Shatner tweeted that she was “the World’s Sweetheart and beloved by all”.
“So sad to hear of Doris Day passing away,” Paul McCartney wrote on his personal blog. “She was a true star in more ways than one. I had the privilege of hanging out with her on a few occasions. Visiting her in her Californian home was like going to an animal sanctuary where her many dogs were taken care of in splendid style. She had a heart of gold and was a very funny lady who I shared many laughs with.
I had forgotten about her son's connection to the Manson gang (as record-producer-who-almost-signed-Charlie, and the previous tenant of the Tate murder scene). The upcoming Tarantino Manson film does not appear to have listed parts for Terry Melcher or Dennis Wilson
Bermuda999
2019-05-14 02:13:30 UTC
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Post by Bermuda999
Post by melbedewy
2:12 PM (less than a minute ago)
An instant star in the 40's with Les Brown and His Band of Renown she is, I believe the last headliner from the original Big Band era.
All that's left is sidemen like Ray Anthony (also 97) and even more obscure sidemen.
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/may/13/calamity-jane-star-doris-day-dies-at-97
Shares
6,656
Comments
395
Doris Day, circa 1962.
Doris Day, circa 1962. Photograph: Archive Photos/Getty Images
Doris Day, the actor, singer and animal welfare activist, has died at the age of 97. The Doris Day Animal Foundation confirmed the news.
Born Doris Mary Ann Kappelhoff in Cincinnati, Ohio, Day was known for a string of successful musicals and romantic comedies, including Pillow Talk, as well as a singing career that encompassed 29 studio albums.
Calamity Jane review – hugely enjoyable proto-lesbian musical
5 out of 5 stars.
Read more
Descended from German immigrants to the US, Day first gained fame with a recording of Sentimental Journey on 1945 as a vocalist for Les Brown and His Band of Renown; the song became a popular second world war anthem, and by 1946 she was the highest paid female singer in the world.
Her film career started with a role in the 1948 musical comedy Romance on the High Seas, which she secured after Betty Hutton dropped out due to pregnancy. Day proved a hit with audiences, specialising in musical comedy roles, including My Dream is Yours, Tea for Two and I’ll See You in My Dreams. In 1953, she took on the title role of the hit film Calamity Jane, a major hit which later turned into both a stage musical and a TV show.
Major role ... Day in Calamity Jane
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Major role ... Day in Calamity Jane. Photograph: Everett/Rex/Shutterstock
Day engineered a career change shortly afterwards, declining to renew her contract with Warner Bros with the intention of branching out. Her breakthrough role came opposite James Cagney in the musical Love Me or Leave Me, in which she played real-life singer Ruth Etting. Day herself believed it to be her best performance.
Advertisement
Day followed it up with roles in Alfred Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much and the poorly received thriller Julie. The disappointing results of the latter film prompted her to return to comedy, and she secured an Oscar nomination for her role alongside Rock Hudson in 1959 romantic comedy Pillow Talk. This inaugurated a successful period at the box office for Day, which included That Touch of Mink with Cary Grant, The Thrill of It All opposite James Garner, and Move Over, Darling, which had originally been conceived as Something’s Got to Give, a comeback vehicle for Marilyn Monroe.
Big box office ... Day with James Garner in Move Over, Darling
Facebook
Twitter
Pinterest
Big box office ... Day with James Garner in Move Over, Darling. Photograph: Allstar/20th Century Fox/Sportsphoto Ltd./Allstar
However, Day’s perky style did not survive America’s mid-60s social upheaval, and her popularity swiftly declined in the counterculture era. Day’s film career tailed off with her last film, With Six You Get Eggroll, in 1968; she then moved to the small screen with The Doris Day Show, albeit with reluctance after she discovered she owed large debts after her husband Marty Melcher died in 1968. The show ran for five years; after the final season in 1973, she largely retired and put her efforts into animal welfare activism. She started Doris Day Animal Foundation, a non-profit which aimed at helping animals across the US.
Day was married four times, to musicians Al Jorden (1941-43) and George Weidler (1946-49), agent and producer Melcher (1951-68) and restaurateur Barry Comden (1976-81). With her first husband she had her only child, record producer Terry Melcher, who died in 2004. Day received the the Presidential Medal of Freedom in 2004.
Tributes for the actor have poured in from Hollywood with Goldie Hawn tweeting that Day will has taken “a piece of the sun with her” and Tony Bennett writing that he is “saddened” by the death of “a wonderful friend”.
“One of my all time favourite stars has joined the heavenly choir,” tweeted Elaine Paige. Rest in Peace the great & inimitable Doris Day. The last star of the Hollywood Golden Age. We’ll bid you farewell by the Light of The Silvery Moon, but you will always be Young at Heart to us forever.”
On Instagram, Sarah Jessica Parker shared a tribute, writing “I love you. Millions did and do. Godspeed” while William Shatner tweeted that she was “the World’s Sweetheart and beloved by all”.
“So sad to hear of Doris Day passing away,” Paul McCartney wrote on his personal blog. “She was a true star in more ways than one. I had the privilege of hanging out with her on a few occasions. Visiting her in her Californian home was like going to an animal sanctuary where her many dogs were taken care of in splendid style. She had a heart of gold and was a very funny lady who I shared many laughs with.
I had forgotten about her son's connection to the Manson gang (as record-producer-who-almost-signed-Charlie, and the previous tenant of the Tate murder scene). The upcoming Tarantino Manson film does not appear to have listed parts for Terry Melcher or Dennis Wilson
For anybody with Antenna TV, Johnny Carson's Tonight Show has Doris Day on it (schedule changed)
That Derek
2019-05-13 18:39:36 UTC
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https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/news/doris-day-dead-pillow-talk-actress-que-sera-sera-singer-was-97-772821

MOVIES

Doris Day, Hollywood's Favorite Girl Next Door, Dies at 97

6:12 AM PDT 5/13/2019
by Duane Byrge , Mike Barnes

The virginal actress and singer — the pop and jazz vocalist had her first No. 1 hit in 1945 — excelled as the star of breezy romantic comedies opposite the likes of Rock Hudson and James Garner.

Doris Day, the fresh-faced singer and actress who was a ray of sunshine during the 1950s and ’60s, when she reigned as the queen of the box office, has died. She was 97.

Day, an extremely popular pop singer and jazz vocalist before Warner Bros. brought her to Hollywood, died early Monday at her Carmel Valley, California, home surrounded by a few close friends, the Doris Day Animal Foundation announced in a news release.

She "had been in excellent physical health for her age until recently contracting a serious case of pneumonia, resulting in her death," it said.

According to the foundation, Day didn't want a funeral or memorial service and wanted to be buried without a grave marker.

One of the most beloved movie stars of all time, Day was widely embraced for her ever-optimistic nature and innocent charm. Among her more than three dozen movies, she typically played a cheerful woman with a buttery voice and winning smile. With her clean-cut blond looks, Day was accessibly gorgeous, with audiences relating to her down-home demeanor.

Most associated with the song, “Que Sera, Sera (Whatever Will Be, Will Be),” the Academy Award-winning tune she first performed in Alfred Hitchcock’s The Man Who Knew Too Much (1956), the Cincinnati native received her only Oscar nomination for starring as a career woman who falls for ladies man Rock Hudson in Pillow Talk (1959).

Although she demonstrated dramatic skills at times, Day was best known for her succession of cozy romantic farces. In these whimsical love stories, she usually starred as a woman whose sweetness, despite male trickery or circumstances, always won the day.

In the late 1950s, Day was paired with her era’s top leading men and considered the nation’s No. 1 box-office attraction. She starred again with Hudson in Lover Come Back (1961) and Send Me No Flowers (1964), with Cary Grant in That Touch of Mink (1962) and with James Garner in the 1963 films The Thrill of It All and Move Over, Darling.

Reflecting the tastes and moral climate of the times, these liaisons were squeaky clean and void of the kinds of lovemaking and sex scenes considered so necessary today.

Day was nicknamed “The Virgin Queen” for the purity of her roles, and composer-pundit Oscar Levant once quipped, “I knew Doris Day before she was a virgin.”

“I liked being married [in her movies] instead of the girl who’s looking for a guy,” she told The Hollywood Reporter in 2011. “I liked those scripts because you fight, and it was all real.”

Day also starred from 1968-73 on the CBS sitcom The Doris Day Show as a widow with two young sons who lives on a ranch and works as a secretary at a San Francisco magazine (her character’s circumstances changed from season to season).

In 1975, she stunned her fans and Hollywood when she wrote a candid, warts-and-all biography, Doris Day: Her Own Story, in which she debunked her sugarcoated image and said she didn’t know she had become attached to the TV series until her crooked husband, Marty Melcher, had died. She also learned she was bankrupt.

A virtual recluse in recent years, the pet-loving Day most recently worked as an animal rights activist, running her foundation. She also owned the Cypress Inn in Carmel-by-the-Sea, a hotel where animals socialized alongside humans during a daily “Yappy Hour” held at the restaurant called Terry’s, named after her only child, who died in 2004.

Her foundation said she was born Mary Ann Von Kappelhoff on April 3, 1922 (the year of her birth was confirmed on her birthday in 2017). Her father was an accomplished musician and voice teacher. Day wanted a career as a dancer but at age 12 was involved in a near-fatal car accident and spent many months in and out of hospitals, cutting short her dancing aspirations.

During her convalescence, she turned to singing, soon performing on radio and in clubs and taking a stage name borrowed from her favorite song, “Day by Day.”

“I couldn’t walk for almost three years. That was the greatest thing that happened,” she told THR. “Instead of dancing, I sang. They carried me three times a week up a stairway to my music teacher.”

As a songstress, Day attracted a considerable following, winning the attention of leading bandleaders Bob Crosby (Bing's brother) and Les Brown. She traveled the country for roughly eight years with big bands and at age 23 recorded her first major hit with Brown, “Sentimental Journey” — a favorite of American G.I.’s that made it to No. 1 in 1945.

“Apart from having a beautiful voice and command of its every shading, Day’s success was based on her approach to songs and audiences,” Bruce Eder wrote of the performer on All Music website. “When she sang, she sounded as though she were singing not to a crowd or a mass ‘audience,’ but to each individual listener. Her records and her performances resonated for listeners personally, and coupled with the considerable merits of her voice and the quality of Brown’s band, it made her a huge favorite with almost anyone who heard her.” (She was awarded a Grammy for lifetime achievement in 2008.)

Her stage appeal soon prompted other opportunities. In 1948, after an appearance at New York’s Little Club, she was asked to do a screen test for Warner Bros. Director Michael Curtiz was so impressed, he cast her as a last-minute replacement for Betty Hutton in the musical Romance on the High Seas (1948).

“No matter what you do onscreen, no matter what kind of part you play, it will always be you,” Curtiz was quoted as saying in the 2010 biography Doris Day: The Untold Story of the Girl Next Door. “What I mean is, Doris Day will always shine through the part. This will make you a big, important star.”

The camera loved her, and she was quickly put in a succession of pictures, including opposite Jack Carson in My Dream Is Yours (1949) and with Kirk Douglas in Young Man With a Horn (1950). Day won top billing for the first time in Tea for Two (1950), a popular musical set in the Roaring Twenties, and she danced, too.

Day made an about-turn in her next project, Storm Warning (1951), a serious drama about Ku Klux Klan violence in the South. That caught the eye of Hitchcock, who five years later would cast her as Jimmy Stewart’s wife in the Morocco-set thriller The Man Who Knew Too Much.

Day then went on to star in four films with singer (and Tea for Two co-star) Gordon McRae, most notably On Moonlight Bay (1951) and its sequel, By the Light of the Silvery Moon (1953). Then came her star-making turn as a famous frontierswoman in Calamity Jane (1953), in which she sang the Academy Award-winning “Secret Love.” It was another No. 1 hit for her.

In 1954, Day was cast opposite Frank Sinatra in Young at Heart (1954), then left Warners to star in MGM’s Love Me or Leave Me (1955), portraying lively 1920s torch singer Ruth Etting opposite James Cagney. The movie, which included such memorable songs as “Ten Cents a Dance,” “You Made Me Love You,” “I’ll Never Stop Loving You” and the ballad “Love Me or Leave Me,” was said to be her favorite.

Following The Man Who Knew Too Much, Day went on to star in the film version of the Broadway hit The Pajama Game (1957), playing the feisty union leader of the Sleep Tite Pajama Factory. Her musical numbers, choreographed by Bob Fosse, included “Small Talk,” “I’m Not at All in Love,” “Hey There” and “There Once Was a Man.”

Day later was paired with Clark Gable in Teacher’s Pet (1958), Richard Widmark in The Tunnel of Love (1958), Jack Lemmon in It Happened to Jane (1959) and David Niven in Please Don’t Eat the Daisies (1960).

She showed that she could play something other than the girl next door, such as in Midnight Lace (1960), in which she portrayed a woman being terrorized. Later, she starred in such popular fare as Billy Rose’s Jumbo (1962), Do Not Disturb (1965), The Glass Bottom Boat (1966) opposite Rod Taylor, Caprice (1967), The Ballad of Josie (1967), Where Were You When the Lights Went Out? (1968) and With Six You Get Eggroll (1968), her last film.

All the while, she kept up her singing career, notably recording Duet, an album of jazz with Andre Previn, in 1961.

In September 1968, she began The Doris Day Show (with the Ray Evans & Jay Livingston-penned “Que Sera, Sera” serving as the theme song) and briefly returned to TV by hosting a 1985-86 Christian Broadcast Network cable show, Doris Day’s Best Friends.

During her Cecil B. DeMille Award acceptance speech at the Golden Globes in 1989, she said, “I’ve been away much too long” and “the best is yet to come, I want to do more.” Yet she did not act in another TV show or film again.

Day, however, did release My Heart, a collection of standards and pop hits from the 1960s and ’70s that marked her first album in 17 years, in 2011.

After Melcher, her husband since 1951, died suddenly in 1968, Day discovered she was bankrupt. Six years later, she won a $23 million lawsuit against her former lawyer and manager Jerome B. Rosenthal for malpractice but settled with an insurance company for $6 million. The Doris Day Show helped her restore her finances.

Her fourth and final husband was Barry Comden, whom Day met when he was the maitre d’ at a Beverly Hills restaurant. They married in 1976 and established a line of pet food, with the goal of establishing a nonprofit animal foundation, but the business unraveled because of a pyramid-type scheme. They divorced in 1981.

Day’s first two husbands were trombonist Al Jorden and saxophonist George Weidler; both marriages did not go well and ended in divorce too.

Terry Melcher, her son with Jorden, died of melanoma at age 62. He produced albums for The Byrds including Mr. Tamborine Man and Turn, Turn, Turn and worked with Ry Cooder, The Beach Boys and Paul Revere and the Raiders, among others.
l***@yahoo.com
2019-05-13 22:04:11 UTC
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I hadn't heard of her, in the 1980s, when I was a teen and happened to pick up her biography (as told to A.E. Hotchner). I hadn't heard of James Stewart either - Day worked with him.)

A few years later, I asked my grandmother to tape one of Day's movies, since I didn't have my own VCR. She refused. Apparently, she disliked Day for the same reason many of my peers probably did. (My grandmother definitely did not like Bing Crosby's music OR Frank Sinatra's - she called Sinatra's music "sappy." (She preferred classical.)

On to Day...here's what I posted a while back:

Many have assumed that she was actually born in 1922, not 1924 (she claims the latter in her 1970s bio).

Granted, it's common enough for actresses to pretend to be younger than they are.

But...according to this, while she DID, in effect, lie about her age when she was very young, it was to make herself seem OLDER! So that would suggest that she was in fact born in 1924 - and married at 17, as she claimed.

http://www.npr.org/2012/04/02/149392321/doris-day-a-hollywood-legend-reflects-on-life

Excerpts:


"...that's when I started to sing — by myself — in a beautiful club in Cincinnati at the age of 16."

The club was 18-and-up, so Day's bandleader lied to the club owners and told them that his young singer was, in fact, a legal adult.

"I kept forgetting that I wasn't two years older for years," she says. "As the years go on, and my mother said to me, 'You know what, it just occurred to me. You're not really 30. You're 28.' And I looked at her and said, 'Oh my gosh, I forgot all about that.'"


Also:

Granted, I don't remember her explaining why her mother didn't invoke her legal rights as a parent and insist that she wait until 18 or so - but even if she'd been 19 at the time, by most people's standards, that would still have been too young and naive an age - and her first husband turned out to be a violent psychopath whose premarital jealousy, nowadays at least, would have been a real red flag to anyone over 20 - I hope.

(Though I thought Doris was being too hard on herself in hindsight when, on their first date, musician Al Jorden - six years older - was pleasant and relaxed, unlike his usual nasty temper when driving her home from band performances. She said "this Jekyll-Hyde switch from grump to charmer should have warned me, but..." I mean, maybe she just thought that she was having a good influence on him and that he was changing for her sake, as happens so often in romance novels? Even today, people wouldn't necessarily assume that such a man was going to turn back into Mr. Hyde!)


Lenona.
That Derek
2019-05-13 22:36:09 UTC
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At one point depending on what birth year was the currency, Doris Day was born the exact same day (same year) as Marlon Brando.

My first exposure and cognizance of both Ms. Day and her signature song Que Sera Sera was her eponymous TV sitcom. While riding a San Francisco cable car, she warbled it, and this six-year old thought she was actually singing "Hey, sit down, sit down" as a beckoning come-on for viewers to "sit down" and watch her show.

Didn't Groucho Marx once remark that he knew Doris Day when "she wasn't a virgin"?
A Friend
2019-05-14 02:40:41 UTC
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Post by That Derek
Didn't Groucho Marx once remark that he knew Doris Day when "she wasn't a virgin"?
Maybe, maybe not, but Oscar Levant* said he'd known her since before
she was a virgin.


*Oscar Levant was a friend and collaborator of George Gershwin's. Long
after Gershwin's death, Levant was in a car accident and suffered head
trauma, which caused him to blink compulsively and hold his arms and
legs in something like fetal position when sitting. He chain-smoked,
too, back when smoking was allowed on TV. Despite all that, or maybe
even because of it, Levant was a frequent guest on Jack Paar's**
various talk shows. Levant just plain weirded me out when I was a kid.

**The guy before Johnny Carson.***

***The guy before Jay Leno. I'll go on if I have to, but I'm already
feeling pretty old.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-05-14 03:43:26 UTC
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Post by That Derek
Didn't Groucho Marx once remark that he knew Doris Day when "she wasn't a virgin"?
Maybe, maybe not, but Oscar Levant* said he'd known her since before
she was a virgin.
*Oscar Levant was a friend and collaborator of George Gershwin's. Long
after Gershwin's death, Levant was in a car accident and suffered head
trauma, which caused him to blink compulsively and hold his arms and
legs in something like fetal position when sitting. He chain-smoked,
too, back when smoking was allowed on TV. Despite all that, or maybe
even because of it, Levant was a frequent guest on Jack Paar's**
various talk shows. Levant just plain weirded me out when I was a kid.
**The guy before Johnny Carson.***
***The guy before Jay Leno. I'll go on if I have to, but I'm already
feeling pretty old.
Would that be the guy after Steve Allen?
RH Draney
2019-05-14 06:48:52 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
*Levant was a frequent guest on Jack Paar's**
various talk shows. Levant just plain weirded me out when I was a kid.
**The guy before Johnny Carson.***
***The guy before Jay Leno. I'll go on if I have to, but I'm already
feeling pretty old.
Would that be the guy after Steve Allen?
You've got Ernie Kovacs in there somewhere too...and Peter Lind Hayes
for a couple of weeks at least....r

That Derek
2019-05-13 23:00:54 UTC
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Below is a YouTube link to a 1975 Doris Day TV special in which Doris performs "Midnight at the Oasis" with the unlikely triumvirate of Tim Conway, John Denver, and Rich Little.

I remember watching this with my older sister first-run. IIRC, the sketch continues beyond what YouTube offers -- the camper van shakes and the Lockers, a LA-based break-dance troupe, emerge one-by-one from the van's middle doors and do a dance number.



It was sketches like this that eventually killed off TV variety special.
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