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Isaac Asimov's 100th Anniversary
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l***@yahoo.com
2020-01-03 00:04:02 UTC
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Plenty of tributes...

https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1CAFIXM_enUS882&ei=nxQOXrGgH_Cg_QbC8qjYCA&q=isaac+asimov+100th+anniversary



My first exposure to Asimov's work was the classic short story "The Fun They Had," which we had to read in school and analyze (with a partner) when we were 8.

Trouble is, even if I had read the first paragraph properly...
_____________________________________________

Margie even wrote about it that night in her diary. On the page headed May 17, 2157, she wrote, "Today, Tommy found a real book!"
____________________________________________

...I STILL wouldn't have been able to grasp the idea of a story that takes place in the future; chances are I had never heard of such a thing, at the time!

Which kind of hurt my understanding of the assignment!

Not to mention that since the 1990s or so, it's become impossible to read the story in the same way. (Not that most parents would really want their kids homeschooled in that particular manner; neither of Margie's parents is her "teacher," after all.)

But there's still at least one other distinctive prediction that HASN'T come true:
______________________________________________

They turned the pages, which were yellow and crinkly, and it was awfully funny to read words that stood still instead of moving the way they were supposed to--on a screen, you know. And then, when they turned back to the page before, it had the same words on it that it had had when they read it the first time.

"Gee," said Tommy, "what a waste. When you're through with the book, you just throw it away, I guess. Our television screen must have had a million books on it and it's good for plenty more. I wouldn't throw IT away."
________________________________________________

In other words, kids of the future aren't even expected - or allowed - to read any page or book more than once! (Though it's not clear whether this has more to do with kids' impatience or parents' impatience.)

You can read the whole thing here:

https://lewebpedagogique.com/anglais/wp-content/blogs.dir/16/files/the-fun-they-had.pdf



Lenona.
Louis Epstein
2020-01-03 17:52:32 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
Plenty of tributes...
https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1CAFIXM_enUS882&ei=nxQOXrGgH_Cg_QbC8qjYCA&q=isaac+asimov+100th+anniversary
I observed the anniversary by picking it to let Verizon cut over
the last remaining active pair of the 100-pair copper cable down my
driveway (laid in when I set up a dialup ISP in my basement) to fiber
service.

(Copper connections are being completely discontinued in my exchange this
year...there is one remaining line to the house on OLDER copper that has
yet to be converted).
Post by l***@yahoo.com
My first exposure to Asimov's work was the classic short story "The Fun They
Had," which we had to read in school and analyze (with a partner) when we were
8.
Mine was "Foundation Trilogy" at a similar age.
Later met him a few times in the 1970s and 80s.
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Trouble is, even if I had read the first paragraph properly...
_____________________________________________
Margie even wrote about it that night in her diary. On the page headed May 17,
2157, she wrote, "Today, Tommy found a real book!"
____________________________________________
137 years in the future...the human longevity record remains at 122 (January
2 was also the (117th) birthday of the current oldest living person,Kane
Tanaka...born 17 years before Asimov and alive almost 28 after his death)
but certainly plenty of people alive in 2157 will remember people who are
alive today.
Post by l***@yahoo.com
...I STILL wouldn't have been able to grasp the idea of a story that takes place in the future; chances are I had never heard of such a thing, at the time!
Which kind of hurt my understanding of the assignment!
Not to mention that since the 1990s or so, it's become impossible to read the story in the same way. (Not that most parents would really want their kids homeschooled in that particular manner; neither of Margie's parents is her "teacher," after all.)
______________________________________________
They turned the pages, which were yellow and crinkly, and it was awfully funny to read words that stood still instead of moving the way they were supposed to--on a screen, you know. And then, when they turned back to the page before, it had the same words on it that it had had when they read it the first time.
"Gee," said Tommy, "what a waste. When you're through with the book, you just throw it away, I guess. Our television screen must have had a million books on it and it's good for plenty more. I wouldn't throw IT away."
________________________________________________
In other words, kids of the future aren't even expected - or allowed - to read any page or book more than once! (Though it's not clear whether this has more to do with kids' impatience or parents' impatience.)
https://lewebpedagogique.com/anglais/wp-content/blogs.dir/16/files/the-fun-they-had.pdf
Lenona.
-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
A Friend
2020-01-03 18:06:01 UTC
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Post by Louis Epstein
I observed the anniversary by picking it to let Verizon cut over
the last remaining active pair of the 100-pair copper cable down my
driveway (laid in when I set up a dialup ISP in my basement) to fiber
service.
Asimov said in his (very long) autobiography that he may have been born
as early as October 1919. Haven't read the book(s) in thirty years,
but IIRC the problem had something to do with the Gregorian, Julian and
Hebrew calendars not agreeing. (His parents had been married for more
than a year before October 1919, so it wasn't *that*.) I forget why
Asimov picked January 2 1920 but he came to regret it, since that made
him *just* young enough to be drafted in late 1945 or early 1946. He
wouldn't have been drafted if he'd chosen October 1919.

Anyway, here's another salute to the great Isaac Asimov. Thanks for
everything.
Louis Epstein
2020-01-03 19:12:31 UTC
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Post by A Friend
Post by Louis Epstein
I observed the anniversary by picking it to let Verizon cut over
the last remaining active pair of the 100-pair copper cable down my
driveway (laid in when I set up a dialup ISP in my basement) to fiber
service.
Asimov said in his (very long) autobiography that he may have been born
as early as October 1919. Haven't read the book(s) in thirty years,
but IIRC the problem had something to do with the Gregorian, Julian and
Hebrew calendars not agreeing. (His parents had been married for more
than a year before October 1919, so it wasn't *that*.) I forget why
Asimov picked January 2 1920 but he came to regret it, since that made
him *just* young enough to be drafted in late 1945 or early 1946. He
wouldn't have been drafted if he'd chosen October 1919.
He was officially the first person born in the 1920s to enroll
at Columbia University...a shame if he really wasn't.
(I have all three autobio volumes...I wish the third was more of
a straightforward continuation of the first two,but he thought he
was improving it by making it otherwise...just as he did his
retroactive jumbling of the properly completely distinct robot-story,
robot-novel,and Foundation futures).
Post by A Friend
Anyway, here's another salute to the great Isaac Asimov. Thanks for
everything.
-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
Dave Garrett
2020-01-04 22:58:45 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
Plenty of tributes...
https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1CAFIXM_enUS882&ei=nxQOXrGgH_Cg_QbC8qjYCA&q=isaac+asimov+100th+anniversary
Meanwhile, over on Twitter, everyone's remembering him more for a
history of sexual assault than for his writing:

https://twitter.com/john_overholt/status/1212728610890670082
--
Dave
A Friend
2020-01-05 03:50:09 UTC
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Post by Dave Garrett
Post by l***@yahoo.com
Plenty of tributes...
https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1CAFIXM_enUS882&ei=nxQOXrGgH_Cg_QbC8qjYCA&
q=isaac+asimov+100th+anniversary
Meanwhile, over on Twitter, everyone's remembering him more for a
https://twitter.com/john_overholt/status/1212728610890670082
Back in the '70s I had a girlfriend who was in the Gilbert & Sullivan
Society with Asimov. He was awful to her and to others. He thought he
was charming and that women actually liked being pawed, at least by
him.

Thanks for the link.

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