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Philip Margo of the Tokens, Who Sang of a Snoozing Lion, Dies at 79
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Matthew Kruk
2021-11-18 05:11:14 UTC
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His baritone contributed to the 1961 hit "The Lion Sleeps Tonight," which became
one of the most recognizable American pop songs ever.

https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/17/arts/music/philip-margo-dead.html
Jason
2021-11-18 09:55:13 UTC
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Post by Matthew Kruk
His baritone contributed to the 1961 hit "The Lion Sleeps Tonight," which became
one of the most recognizable American pop songs ever.
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/17/arts/music/philip-margo-dead.html
Interesting factoids from Wikipedia: Lion Sleeps Tonight is actually an example of yodeling.

The Lion Sleeps Tonight
One famous yodeling tune known the world-over is the song "The Lion Sleeps Tonight", also known as "Wimoweh". It was first recorded by Solomon Linda and the Evening Birds in South Africa in 1939. Linda, a singer of Zulu origin, wrote the song, originally titled "Mbube" (Zulu: lion), while working for the Gallo Record Company as a cleaner and record packer. According to South African journalist Rian Malan:

"Mbube" wasn't the most remarkable tune, but there was something terribly compelling about the underlying chant, a dense meshing of low male voices above which Solomon yodeled and howled for two exhilarating minutes, occasionally making it up as he went along. The third take was the great one, but it achieved immortality only in its dying seconds, when Solly took a deep breath, opened his mouth and improvised the melody that the world now associates with these words:

In the jungle, the mighty jungle, the lion sleeps tonight.
By 1948, the song had sold about 100,000 copies in Africa and among black South African immigrants in Great Britain and had lent its name to a style of African a cappella music that evolved into isicathamiya (also called mbube), popularized by Ladysmith Black Mambazo.. It was covered internationally by many 1950s pop and folk revival artists, including The Weavers, Jimmy Dorsey, Yma Sumac, Miriam Makeba, and The Kingston Trio. In 1961, it became a number one hit in the U.S. as adapted by the doo-wop group The Tokens and in 1982 as a number one hit in the UK for Tight Fit. It went on to earn at least 15 million US dollars in royalties from covers and film licensing. Then, in the mid-nineties, it became a pop "supernova" when it was used in the film The Lion King, its spin-off TV series and live musical.
Louis Epstein
2021-11-19 01:36:10 UTC
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Post by Jason
Post by Matthew Kruk
His baritone contributed to the 1961 hit "The Lion Sleeps Tonight," which became
one of the most recognizable American pop songs ever.
https://www.nytimes.com/2021/11/17/arts/music/philip-margo-dead.html
Interesting factoids from Wikipedia: Lion Sleeps Tonight is actually an example of yodeling.
The Lion Sleeps Tonight
One famous yodeling tune known the world-over is the song "The Lion Sleeps
Tonight", also known as "Wimoweh".
"Wimoweh" was Pete Seeger's mis-hearing of the Zulu word "Uyimbube",
Zulu for "You think you're a lion?"...a version of the song with
the name "Wimoweh"
was recorded by British
musician Karl Denver (on topic 1998) who groused that the song had
"nothing to do with a bloody lion" when the Tokens version (English
lyrics by George David Weiss) became a bigger hit...Jay Siegel
(still living:see https://www.jaysiegelstokens.com/ and ***@optonline.net )
sang lead on that recording,but when the group broke up into different
Tokens led by him and the Margo brothers,Phil's brother Mitch (on
topic 2017) sang lead with them (Siegel still doing so at rare
all-Token reunions).
Post by Jason
It was first recorded by Solomon Linda and the Evening Birds in South
Africa in 1939. Linda, a singer of Zulu origin, wrote the song, originally
titled "Mbube" (Zulu: lion), while working for the Gallo Record Company as a
In the jungle, the mighty jungle, the lion sleeps tonight.
By 1948, the song had sold about 100,000 copies in Africa and among black South African immigrants in Great Britain and had lent its name to a style of African a cappella music that evolved into isicathamiya (also called mbube), popularized by Ladysmith Black Mambazo.. It was covered internationally by many 1950s pop and folk revival artists, including The Weavers, Jimmy Dorsey, Yma Sumac, Miriam Makeba, and The Kingston Trio. In 1961, it became a number one hit in the U.S. as adapted by the doo-wop group The Tokens and in 1982 as a number one hit in the UK for Tight Fit. It went on to earn at least 15 million US dollars in royalties from covers and film licensing. Then, in the mid-nineties, it became a pop "supernova" when it was used in the film The Lion King, its spin-off TV series and live musical.
-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.

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