Discussion:
Charles Daniel Knowles Sr., aka "Captain Hornblower," 75, operated charter boat & Captain Hornblower's Jazz Club in Key West
Add Reply
Hoodoo
2010-05-18 07:46:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Sunday, May 16, 2010
http://keysnews.com/node/23268

CHARLES DANIEL KNOWLES SR.

Danny Knowles (Charles Daniel Knowles Sr.), known to his friends in the
jazz community as "Captain Hornblower" died peacefully at home on
Friday, May 7, 2010, in Panama City, Fla. He was 75.

Left to cherish his memory are his devoted wife of 55 years, Patricia
(Jones) Knowles; son, Charles D. Knowles Jr. and wife Barbara of Panama
City; sister, Martha (Knowles) Norville and husband Peyton of
Birmingham, Ala.; brother, Captain Frank W. Knowles Jr. and wife Gail;
two grandsons, Charles D. Knowles III and James Russell Knowles, all of
Panama City; and a number of nieces, nephews and grandnieces. He was
predeceased by his father, Captain Frank W. Knowles Sr., whose family
was one of the original settlers of St. Andrews; and mother, Thelma
(Sims) Knowles.

He also lost an infant son, Miles Edgar Knowles.

He was born in 1934 in Glen Head, N.Y., while his father was serving as
captain of the vessel Barracuda for the famous industrialist Clayton
Chiles Frick.

As a young child, he and his parents returned to Panama City, but he
continued to spend a large part of his youth in Glen Head with his
beloved Uncle George and Aunt Avie. It was during his time in New York
that he began his love of music and first took up the trumpet, the
instrument that would forever define who he was. He studied under the
direction of John Ned Mahoney at the Ernest S. Williams School of Music
in Brooklyn, N.Y., and was the recipient of numerous awards on the
regional and state level.

After graduating from Bay High, he married his high school sweetheart,
Patricia (Jones) Knowles in 1956. They immediately embarked on the
adventure of traveling around the country while Danny played his horn
with big bands in a different city every night.

When he wasn't playing music, he was engaged in his second passion,
fishing. He ran a charter boat business in Panama City and South Florida
aboard the aptly named Captain Hornblower. He was one of the first
charter fishermen in this area to spend winters in the Keys and summers
in Northwest Florida. He brought his knowledge of game fishing to Panama
City and was instrumental in the introduction of billfishing to this
area. In later years, long before it was popular, he was an advocate for
catch-and-release fishing and always encouraged others towards conservation.

For a time he ran his charter boat by day and played music at night
until he finally realized his dream in the 1970s and opened Captain
Hornblower's Jazz Club in Key West. The club became a mecca for jazz
fans and for many world-famous musicians who came to play with the
Captain and his band. It also served as the perfect training ground for
a number of younger musicians who honed their skills on the Captain's
stage and then went on to their own fame and fortune. Known for his slow
Southern drawl and melodic playing, some of his best work can be heard
on his last recording, titled "Jazz in the Key of West."

After 20-plus years in Key West, health issues and his desire to be
closer to his family led him to sell the club and move back to Panama
City. He never waned in his advocacy for musicians and live music.
Continuing in his passion for jazz and the desire to bring live music to
Panama City, he opened Captain Hornblower's on Grace Avenue in the late
'90s, where he played until its closing. He was one of the founding
members of the Gulf Jazz Society and was a major sponsor of the Annual
Jazz by the Bay Festival.

In accordance with his wishes, funeral services will be private. His
family will gather to say their last goodbyes and his ashes will be
spread in St. Andrews Bay and in the waters off Key West. Anyone wishing
to leave a memory or a word of condolence may do so at
***@gmail.com or http://www.wilsonfuneralhome.net.

At the end of each set, Danny would close with these words: "Support
jazz -- it's the one true American art form."
--
Trout Mask Replica

KFJC.org, WFMU.org, WMSE.org, or WUSB.org;
because the pigoenholed programming of music channels
on Sirius Satellite, and its internet radio player, suck
t***@gmail.com
2020-01-09 00:39:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Hoodoo
Sunday, May 16, 2010
http://keysnews.com/node/23268
CHARLES DANIEL KNOWLES SR.
Danny Knowles (Charles Daniel Knowles Sr.), known to his friends in the
jazz community as "Captain Hornblower" died peacefully at home on
Friday, May 7, 2010, in Panama City, Fla. He was 75.
Left to cherish his memory are his devoted wife of 55 years, Patricia
(Jones) Knowles; son, Charles D. Knowles Jr. and wife Barbara of Panama
City; sister, Martha (Knowles) Norville and husband Peyton of
Birmingham, Ala.; brother, Captain Frank W. Knowles Jr. and wife Gail;
two grandsons, Charles D. Knowles III and James Russell Knowles, all of
Panama City; and a number of nieces, nephews and grandnieces. He was
predeceased by his father, Captain Frank W. Knowles Sr., whose family
was one of the original settlers of St. Andrews; and mother, Thelma
(Sims) Knowles.
He also lost an infant son, Miles Edgar Knowles.
He was born in 1934 in Glen Head, N.Y., while his father was serving as
captain of the vessel Barracuda for the famous industrialist Clayton
Chiles Frick.
As a young child, he and his parents returned to Panama City, but he
continued to spend a large part of his youth in Glen Head with his
beloved Uncle George and Aunt Avie. It was during his time in New York
that he began his love of music and first took up the trumpet, the
instrument that would forever define who he was. He studied under the
direction of John Ned Mahoney at the Ernest S. Williams School of Music
in Brooklyn, N.Y., and was the recipient of numerous awards on the
regional and state level.
After graduating from Bay High, he married his high school sweetheart,
Patricia (Jones) Knowles in 1956. They immediately embarked on the
adventure of traveling around the country while Danny played his horn
with big bands in a different city every night.
When he wasn't playing music, he was engaged in his second passion,
fishing. He ran a charter boat business in Panama City and South Florida
aboard the aptly named Captain Hornblower. He was one of the first
charter fishermen in this area to spend winters in the Keys and summers
in Northwest Florida. He brought his knowledge of game fishing to Panama
City and was instrumental in the introduction of billfishing to this
area. In later years, long before it was popular, he was an advocate for
catch-and-release fishing and always encouraged others towards conservation.
For a time he ran his charter boat by day and played music at night
until he finally realized his dream in the 1970s and opened Captain
Hornblower's Jazz Club in Key West. The club became a mecca for jazz
fans and for many world-famous musicians who came to play with the
Captain and his band. It also served as the perfect training ground for
a number of younger musicians who honed their skills on the Captain's
stage and then went on to their own fame and fortune. Known for his slow
Southern drawl and melodic playing, some of his best work can be heard
on his last recording, titled "Jazz in the Key of West."
After 20-plus years in Key West, health issues and his desire to be
closer to his family led him to sell the club and move back to Panama
City. He never waned in his advocacy for musicians and live music.
Continuing in his passion for jazz and the desire to bring live music to
Panama City, he opened Captain Hornblower's on Grace Avenue in the late
'90s, where he played until its closing. He was one of the founding
members of the Gulf Jazz Society and was a major sponsor of the Annual
Jazz by the Bay Festival.
In accordance with his wishes, funeral services will be private. His
family will gather to say their last goodbyes and his ashes will be
spread in St. Andrews Bay and in the waters off Key West. Anyone wishing
to leave a memory or a word of condolence may do so at
At the end of each set, Danny would close with these words: "Support
jazz -- it's the one true American art form."
--
Trout Mask Replica
KFJC.org, WFMU.org, WMSE.org, or WUSB.org;
because the pigoenholed programming of music channels
on Sirius Satellite, and its internet radio player, suck
Sorry to hear of his passing. I spent many nights in the Jazz Club in KW listening, drinking cold beers ,eating conch fritters and watching for the green flash.

Mike Witharspoon

Loading...