Discussion:
On why "Walk Up, Not Out" won't help stop mass school shootings
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l***@yahoo.com
2018-03-31 18:37:05 UTC
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I hadn't heard of it until very recently.

https://www.alternet.org/news-amp-politics/sexist-racist-implications-walk-not-out-movement


Excerpts:

"...Walk Up’s ultimate premise is that the responsibility for ending school violence should be placed on the shoulders of young people who are in school to learn, while demanding nothing of the policymakers who are actually in positions to make change. The movement seems to place the blame for shootings on those who are purportedly complicit in the bullying and marginalizing of students who go on to become mass shooters.

"One viral Facebook post shared last Thursday by psychologist Rebecca Wald explores this in depth:
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'The myth that school shooters are outcasts fighting back against bullies dates back to Columbine. At the time it was widely reported that Harris and Klebold were social rejects, and much was made of the meanness of popular kids. But the FBI concluded that . . . kids didn't like the boys because they did creepy things like walking around giving the Nazi salute. ‘Walk Up, Not Out’ is a campaign of cowardice, promoted by adults who want there to be a solution to school shootings that asks literally nothing of us. No tough choices, no exercise of political will, no speaking out to power — just lecturing kids on how to do better.'
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"...If we tell students to be nicer to gun-loving, Nazi-saluting kids instead of reporting them, we could just as easily tell girls and women never to say no to men..."

(snip)


I first heard of "Walk Up" here:

"I Tried to Befriend Nikolas Cruz. He Still Killed My Friends."

https://www.nytimes.com/2018/03/27/opinion/nikolas-cruz-shooting-florida.html


Excerpts:

"...Despite my discomfort, I sat down with him, alone. I was forced to endure his cursing me out and ogling my chest until the hourlong session ended. When I was done, I felt a surge of pride for having organized his binder and helped him with his homework.

"Looking back, I am horrified. I now understand that I was left, unassisted, with a student who had a known history of rage and brutality.

"Like many pre-teenage and teenage girls, I possessed — and still, to an extent, possess — a strong desire to please. I strive to win the praise of the adults in my life and long to be seen as mature beyond my years. I would have done almost anything to win the approval of my teachers.

"This is not to say that children should reject their more socially awkward or isolated peers — not at all. As a former peer counselor and current teacher’s assistant, I strongly believe in and have seen the benefits of reaching out to those who need kindness most.

"But students should not be expected to cure the ills of our genuinely troubled classmates, or even our friends, because we first and foremost go to school to learn. The implication that Mr. Cruz’s mental health problems could have been solved if only he had been loved more by his fellow students is both a gross misunderstanding of how these diseases work and a dangerous suggestion that puts children on the front line.

"It is not the obligation of children to befriend classmates who have demonstrated aggressive, unpredictable or violent tendencies. It is the responsibility of the school administration and guidance department to seek out those students and get them the help that they need, even if it is extremely specialized attention that cannot be provided at the same institution..."

(snip)


And, while I don't know if Cruz is truly mentally ill or not, chances are more love and bland "attention" were NOT what he really needed, as I hinted in a previous thread. Amoral types never get enough attention, in THEIR minds.



Lenona.
Michael OConnor
2018-03-31 21:36:46 UTC
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There was a study from the CDCP that was mentioned in the Huffington Post last year that mentioned the suicide rate among girls 15-19 has increased 50 percent since 2007 and increased 30 percent among boys 15-19 since 2007. I wonder how much of that is due to the isolated online world that some decide to inhabit instead of the real world thanks to their smartphones and Facebook etc. (both of which have came along in the last 15 years) that allow them to avoid many real relationships.
e***@aol.com
2018-03-31 23:55:46 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
There was a study from the CDCP that was mentioned in the Huffington Post last year that mentioned the suicide rate among girls 15-19 has increased 50 percent since 2007 and increased 30 percent among boys 15-19 since 2007. I wonder how much of that is due to the isolated online world that some decide to inhabit instead of the real world thanks to their smartphones and Facebook etc. (both of which have came along in the last 15 years) that allow them to avoid many real relationships.
Unless you read it during a 2-day course for Certified Data Centre Professional training, you probably mean the Center for Disease Control and Prevention, which, despite the added words at the end of its title, continues to go by the acronym "CDC", dating back to its days as the Communicable Disease Center. https://www.cdc.gov/
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