Discussion:
Is she dead? UK novelist Susan Sallis
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Lenona
2020-10-05 21:39:01 UTC
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She lived in Somerset. Here's what I posted at the Abebooks forum, edited slightly:

According to one reviewer, her novels are "enchanting family sagas."

Here are the book covers - to read a description, click on a cover:

https://www.fantasticfiction.com/s/susan-sallis/

She wrote more than 30 books, "many of them set in the West Country."

She was born on November 7, 1929 in Gloucestershire, and Penguin Books claims she died this year - but they don't say when! Very peculiar. What's more, I've done all sorts of searches and I can't find any more evidence of that.

Can anyone confirm this? Of course, she would be 90 if she died this year.
b***@shaw.ca
2020-10-05 22:10:22 UTC
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Post by Lenona
According to one reviewer, her novels are "enchanting family sagas."
https://www.fantasticfiction.com/s/susan-sallis/
She wrote more than 30 books, "many of them set in the West Country."
She was born on November 7, 1929 in Gloucestershire, and Penguin Books claims she died this year - but they don't say when! Very peculiar. What's more, I've done all sorts of searches and I can't find any more evidence of that.
Can anyone confirm this? Of course, she would be 90 if she died this year.
She died in a traffic accident. Here is a news story about it:

<https://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/news/local-news/devastated-family-believe-mum-fell-16343125>

bill
Diner
2020-10-06 00:09:29 UTC
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Post by b***@shaw.ca
<https://www.cambridge-news.co.uk/news/local-news/devastated-family-believe-mum-fell-16343125>
bill
No, that's a completely different person.

Susan Sallis would be 90 today; Gillian Sallis was 77 when she died last year.

The article refers to "a statement read by Susan Sallis, one of Gillian's daughters," but obviously that's a different person too.

Finally, a photo of Susan Sallis at https://www.fantasticfiction.com/s/susan-sallis/ is clearly not the same person as in the article.
Lenona
2020-10-06 01:22:07 UTC
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If Penguin Books goofed, they wouldn't be the first literary company to do that.

See what I said in 2013, when Colorado YA novelist Eleanor Means Hull died, aged 100:

"Not to be confused with the 19th-century British-born scholar/folklorist and president of London's Irish Literary Society, Eleanor Henrietta Hull, even though many online booksellers make that mistake! That is, they keep connecting the Colorado author's name with titles such as "The Northmen in Britain" or "The Boys' Cuchulain" - clearly written or edited by the folklorist, since they were published before EMH was born."

It also reminds me of how the Something About the Author encyclopedias got the Protestant-mystery novelist Dorothy M. Martin confused with the then-living writer/activist Dorothy L. "Del" Martin. (Del married her wife in 2004, in the first same-sex wedding in San Francisco.) The two Martins were born in the same year, 1921, but that's all. The mistake was made in the 1980s and again in all(?) the indexes since Del's death in 2008! The mystery writer still seems to be alive.

Lenona.
Kenny McCormack
2020-10-06 09:49:25 UTC
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In article <08457267-4482-4d5b-820c-***@googlegroups.com>,
Lenona <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
...
Post by Lenona
It also reminds me of how the Something About the Author encyclopedias got the
Protestant-mystery novelist Dorothy M. Martin confused with the then-living
What is a "Protestant-mystery novelist"?

Does it just mean that she was a Protestant, or is that a sub-genre of
fiction?
--
Hindsight is (supposed to be) 2020.

Trumpers, don't make the same mistake twice.
Don't shoot yourself in the feet - and everywhere else - again!.
Lenona
2020-10-06 16:37:53 UTC
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Well, I wasn't sure how to phrase it, but it IS something of a sub-genre of fiction. That is, Martin writes for the Moody Press, and from what I've seen, you have to be pretty religious to get a deal with them. At any rate, she wrote the YA Peggy series from the 1950s to the 1970s (a couple of editions have misleading(?) psychedelic covers, not seen here):

http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&source=hp&biw=1280&bih=832&q=%22dorothy+martin%22+%22moody+press%22&gbv=2&aq=f&aqi=&aql=f&oq=

-and the 1980s Vickie series has five books, which are definitely mysteries.

Plus this one:

Mystery of the Stolen Flight Bag, 1983
"Two Christian girls, both nearly fourteen, become involved in a mystery when a piece of luggage is switched at the crowded Honolulu airport."

She lives in Dallas and her husband/co-author is Alfred.
Lenona
2020-10-09 03:26:16 UTC
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Well, I think I found proof, though not the exact date.

More than one source says the author lived in Clevedon, Somerset.

So I searched on her name plus "Clevedon" and "died" and found this, from All Saints East Clevedon Church, in early June (I can't seem to copy the text):

https://m.facebook.com/405299912896594/posts/with-great-sadness-we-announce-the-death-of-sue-susan-sallis-a-lovely-mum-gran-g/3068668176559741/

It says she was a "well-known popular novelist" and a great-grandmother.
Lenona
2020-10-09 22:29:37 UTC
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Turns out that at least six of her novels were juveniles, mainly about teens with disabilities.

An Open Mind, 1978.
"Torn by conflicting loyalties and emotions, a teen-age boy finally comes to terms with his father's pending remarriage with the help of a spastic boy." (The latter boy, Bruce, has cerebral palsy.)

A Time for Everything, 1979
"A young girl grows up amid many family problems in a small English village during World War II."

Only Love, 1980.
"When she finds herself the object of a young man's love, a spirited, physically handicapped 16-year-old is both touched and frightened for she knows she may now have to share her painful secret."

Sweet Frannie, 1981
"Paralysed from the waist down and confined to a wheelchair, Fran realises she hasn’t much of a future, but when she goes into Thornton Hall Residential Home, things begin to look up. For a start, she has a room of her own for the first time in her life. And pretty soon there’s someone else to think about: eighteen-year-old Luke Hawkins. After all, who better than fiercely independent Fran to help a young boy who has just lost both his legs in a road accident? A book of sweet and sour emotions that will bring tears of admiration and amusement as well as sadness."

Secret Places of the Stairs, 1984
"Seventeen-year-old Cass misunderstands her divorced parents until she discovers the secret they've been keeping from her: she has a severely handicapped, terminally ill younger sister."

No Time at All, 1994.
"Two disabled children love their new bungalow by the sea. It even has its own spectral steam-train which only they can hear each night. The train holds many mysteries which will change their lives."


From 2004, by Lois Keith:
"What Writers Did Next: Disability, Illness and Cure in books in the Second Half of the 20th Century"

https://dsq-sds.org/article/view/845/1020&amp;gt;

The article refers to Sallis' books, plus Jane Eyre, Little Women, Heidi, The Secret Garden, What Katy Did, Deenie (by Judy Blume), and Izzy Willy-Nilly (by Cynthia Voigt).
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