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Harvey Harmon, 76, by four dogs in his front yard
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David Carson
2020-03-09 16:29:44 UTC
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“According to the owner (of the dogs), they weren’t aggressive dogs,
but clearly, they were aggressive that day.”

“The individual who own the dogs, which was kin to Mr. Harvey agreed
to have them euthanized all except for one stray that got away from
us.”

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https://www.wlbt.com/2020/02/06/year-old-man-killed-by-four-dogs-attala-co/

76-year-old man killed by four dogs in Attala Co

February 5, 2020 at 7:40 PM CST - Updated February 5 at 9:14 PM

JACKSON, Miss. (WLBT) -An Attala County community shocked tonight
after a 76-year-old disabled man is mauled to death by four dogs. It
happened Thursday on Highway 14 West at a home in the Palestine
community.

Sheriff Tim Nail identifies the victim as Harvey Harmon, Jr.

“It hard to imagine you live for 76 years and in an instance like that
you die from a dog attack that. I am sure was very horrifying,” said
Sheriff Tim Nail.

According to the sheriff, two pit bulls and two mixed breed strays
mauled Harvey Harmon, Jr. January 30th on Highway 14 in his front
yard. When deputies arrived, the wheelchair bound man found on the
ground, dead. The motive for the killing is still a mystery.

"No, we haven't had any complaints about the dogs are that they
attacked anybody or anyone, so it seems like it was just a random
act," Sheriff Nail.

Two dogs were put down after killing the elderly man.

“The individual who own the dogs, which was kin to Mr. Harvey agreed
to have them euthanized all except for one stray that got away from
us,” said Nail.

Stephanie Wingard lives near where the attack happened.

"They say there is still one the loose, so if he got a taste of blood
they will continue to attack, so I walk my grandson out every morning.
If my daughter can't pick him up is out here to get him."

Wingard says she knew the 76-year-old and his family. She and
neighbors are heartbroken by the news and are praying for the family.

“He was a very sweet man. If you ever come down this road. He is
always outside he loves outside. No one needs to go that way, no one.
Just very saddening.”

The sheriff says no charges have been filed, but the case is still
under investigation.


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https://www.starherald.net/news-kosciusko-attala-county-front-page-slideshow/county-man-mauled-killed-dogs

COUNTY MAN MAULED, KILLED BY DOGS
By KAREN FIORETTI, 1683 READS

THU, 02/06/2020 - 9:22AM

Harvey Harmon, Jr., 76, who lived in the McAdams/Sallis area on
Highway 14 West, was found dead at 9:30 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 30.

According to Sheriff Tim Nail, Harmon died of injuries sustained when
he was attacked by as many as four dogs, two of which kept on Harmon’s
property by a family member who lives in Kosciusko.

Harmon was reportedly found deceased by someone checking on his
well-being. Hi body was found near where one dog was chained and
another had broken free from chains, with two additional stray dogs
present nearby.

“He just might not have been able to fight them off,” said Nail of the
victim.

Although an autopsy confirmed that Harmon died from the dog attack,
Nail said it was unclear exactly when the attack occurred, but it was
likely within the 12 previous hours.

The family member who owned two of the dogs, reported to be bulldogs,
agreed to have his dogs euthanized following the incident.

“According to the owner (of the dogs), they weren’t aggressive dogs,
but clearly, they were aggressive that day,” said Nail. “But the owner
did take responsibility and agreed to have the dogs euthanized.”

The sheriff’s department called a veterinarian to the property to
euthanize the owned animals, as well as one of the involved strays.
The other animal has not been seen since deputies first went to the
scene.
Kenny McCormack
2020-03-09 17:08:17 UTC
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According to the owner (of the dogs), they weren't aggressive dogs,
but clearly, they were aggressive that day.
Kinda like your typical gun-owning American. They were just normal, kind,
law-abiding gun-owning American citizens.

Right up until they stopped being law-abiding.

Right up until that very moment where they started shooting up the school.
Or killing their wife. Or their kids. Or strangers at the army base.

Or.

Or.

Or.
--
Treating the stock market indexes as general measures of the well-being of a
society is like treating your blood pressure as an indicator of health. The
higher, the better, right? In fact, a high stock market is good for the investor
class, but it means the rest of us are getting screwed better than ever.
Adam H. Kerman
2020-03-09 18:14:39 UTC
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Post by Kenny McCormack
According to the owner (of the dogs), they weren't aggressive dogs,
but clearly, they were aggressive that day.
Kinda like your typical gun-owning American. They were just normal, kind,
law-abiding gun-owning American citizens.
Right up until they stopped being law-abiding.
Right up until that very moment where they started shooting up the school.
Or killing their wife. Or their kids. Or strangers at the army base.
Or.
Or.
Or.
Everyone is a law-abiding citizen prior to committing his first crime.
Your "typical" anything isn't typically a murderer.

It's kind of like you. You're a genius, right up until the point at
which you spout your opinion in ignorance.
l***@yahoo.com
2020-03-09 21:58:32 UTC
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Speaking of impulsive violent acts and how to slow them down...

I may have read about the following subject in Charles Panati's book: "Panati's Extraordinary Endings of Practically Everything & Everybody."

However, I couldn't find the passage in Google Books, so this will have to do - it's just as good.

(I had no idea, until now, that, in a certain 1940s Agatha Christie novel, the oven in question was a "coal gas" oven - I had never heard of such a thing!)

https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=92319314


In Suicide Prevention, It's Method, Not Madness
July 8, 2008


The rate of suicide in America is 11 victims per 100,000 people.

That's almost exactly the same as it was in 1965. In spite of the rise of anti-depressant drugs, crisis hotline centers, and better treatment of mental illness, we still haven't gotten much closer to understanding or preventing suicide.

The reason for that might be that prevention focuses more on the study of illness than it does on the actual ways people attempt to kill themselves, says Scott Anderson, the author of a New York Times Magazine article, "The Urge to End It All."

In effect, it's the method, not the madness.

Anderson says that suicide is an overwhelmingly impulsive act. He cites a study of survivors that said only 13 percent reported thinking about committing suicide for eight hours or longer; 70 percent said they thought about it for less than an hour; and a whopping 24 percent said the idea had occurred to them less than five minutes before their attempt.

If that's true, then suicide is highly opportunistic, and Anderson suggests that reducing the opportunities would reduce the incidence. He says that research and anecdotal evidence appear to bear this out. For example, he notes in his magazine piece that states in which gun ownership are highest have the highest rates of suicide by gun; in fact, the higher rates of gun ownership closely track the higher rates of gun suicides by state. Yet suicide rates by other means remain roughly similar.

Anderson points to another example where simply making a change in people's access to instruments of suicide dramatically lowered the suicide rate. In England, death by asphyxiation from breathing oven fumes had accounted for roughly half of all suicides up until the 1970s, when Britain began converting ovens from coal gas, which contains lots of carbon monoxide, to natural gas, which has almost none. During that time, suicides plummeted roughly 30 percent — and the numbers haven't changed since.

Anderson discovered that the personal stories of people who had attempted suicide appeared to support the statistical data, in sometimes very surprising ways. He cited one person who had picked out a place to jump off San Francisco's Golden Gate Bridge, but he never made it. His location meant that he would have had to cross six lanes of traffic, and he was afraid of getting hit by a car.

(end)

And here's the Scott Anderson article (much longer, but it looks as though you don't have to register):

https://www.nytimes.com/2008/07/06/magazine/06suicide-t.html

Excerpt from the first half:

...Quite inadvertently, the British gas conversion proved that the incidence of suicide across an entire society could be radically reduced, upending the conventional wisdom about suicide in the process. Or rather it should have upended the conventional wisdom, for what is astonishing today is how little-known the British coal-gas story is even among mental-health professionals who deal with suicide. Last November, I attended a youth suicide-prevention conference in New Hampshire at which Catherine Barber, a member of the Injury Control Research Center at the Harvard School of Public Health, gave a PowerPoint presentation on creating physical barriers to suicide — or “means restriction,” in public-health parlance —to a large group of mental-health officials and school counselors. While giving a brief history of the approach, she came to several slides describing the British gas-conversion phenomenon and paused.

“Is everyone familiar with the British coal-gas story?” she asked. “If so, I’ll just skip over this.”

Among the 150 or so attendees, only about a half-dozen hands went up. Instead, most looked quite baffled...



Lenona.
A Friend
2020-03-09 22:28:17 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
(I had no idea, until now, that, in a certain 1940s Agatha Christie novel,
the oven in question was a "coal gas" oven - I had never heard of such a
thing!)
Neither had I, but I'm not sure what the difference would be between a
coal gas oven and one that used natural gas.

You used to see those big circular "gas houses" in cities. That's
where coal was heated and the resulting gas drawn off and piped out to
customers.
l***@yahoo.com
2020-03-09 22:32:11 UTC
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Post by A Friend
Neither had I, but I'm not sure what the difference would be between a
coal gas oven and one that used natural gas.
Did you miss this part?

"In England, death by asphyxiation from breathing oven fumes had accounted for roughly half of all suicides up until the 1970s, when Britain began converting ovens from coal gas, which contains lots of carbon monoxide, to natural gas, which has almost none."
A Friend
2020-03-09 22:46:22 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
Post by A Friend
Neither had I, but I'm not sure what the difference would be between a
coal gas oven and one that used natural gas.
Did you miss this part?
"In England, death by asphyxiation from breathing oven fumes had accounted
for roughly half of all suicides up until the 1970s, when Britain began
converting ovens from coal gas, which contains lots of carbon monoxide, to
natural gas, which has almost none."
No, I didn't miss that. I was asking about the technical difference
between an oven that used coal gas and one that used natural gas.
There was all that loose talk about converting ovens. (Google has not
been helpful. It keeps wanting to tell me all about coke ovens, even
though I told it not to.)

I've read that, during the Blitz, Londoners ran coal gas through some
sort of substance (maybe it was charcoal) that converted it into a
serviceable anesthetic.
Adam H. Kerman
2020-03-09 23:06:39 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
Post by A Friend
Neither had I, but I'm not sure what the difference would be between a
coal gas oven and one that used natural gas.
Did you miss this part?
"In England, death by asphyxiation from breathing oven fumes had
accounted for roughly half of all suicides up until the 1970s, when
Britain began converting ovens from coal gas, which contains lots of
carbon monoxide, to natural gas, which has almost none."
As far as we know, the fuel could be changed from coke gas to natural
gas without replacing the oven.
Kenny McCormack
2020-03-09 22:48:24 UTC
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Post by A Friend
Post by l***@yahoo.com
(I had no idea, until now, that, in a certain 1940s Agatha Christie novel,
the oven in question was a "coal gas" oven - I had never heard of such a
thing!)
Neither had I, but I'm not sure what the difference would be between a
coal gas oven and one that used natural gas.
I did some research. Wikipedia (re: "town gas") has this to say:

(Regarding the conversion from town gas to natural gas:

Many dangerous appliances were discovered in this exercise and were taken
out of service.

Which suggests that the mere act of doing the conversion has the nice side
effect of getting rid of some old, unsafe equipment.

Later, it says:

As well as requiring little processing before use, natural gas is
non-toxic; the carbon monoxide (CO) in town gas made it extremely
poisonous, accidental poisoning and suicide by gas being commonplace.
Poisoning from natural gas appliances is only due to incomplete combustion,
which creates CO, and flue leaks to living accommodation. As with town
gas, a small amount of foul-smelling substance (mercaptan) is added to the
gas to indicate to the user that there is a leak or an unlit burner, the
gas having no odor of its own.

Which makes it clear that natural gas is, indeed, safer than town gas,
since it contains no CO. To be honest, this surprised me, since I would
have thought that methane (the primary component of what we call "natural
gas") as itself poisonous, but apparently, such is not the case.
--
Indeed, most .NET developers couldn't pass CS101 at a third-rate
community college.
- F. Russell -
Adam H. Kerman
2020-03-09 23:10:47 UTC
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Post by Kenny McCormack
Post by A Friend
Post by l***@yahoo.com
(I had no idea, until now, that, in a certain 1940s Agatha Christie novel,
the oven in question was a "coal gas" oven - I had never heard of such a
thing!)
Neither had I, but I'm not sure what the difference would be between a
coal gas oven and one that used natural gas.
Many dangerous appliances were discovered in this exercise and were taken
out of service.
Which suggests that the mere act of doing the conversion has the nice side
effect of getting rid of some old, unsafe equipment.
That's because post war there were dramatic improvements in welding
techniques. I'd have been concerned about leaky gas pipes already in the
walls, depending on what era they were installed, but no one would have
repiped just because the fuel was changed.
Post by Kenny McCormack
Later, it says: . . .
A Friend
2020-03-10 02:30:05 UTC
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Post by Kenny McCormack
Post by A Friend
Post by l***@yahoo.com
(I had no idea, until now, that, in a certain 1940s Agatha Christie novel,
the oven in question was a "coal gas" oven - I had never heard of such a
thing!)
Neither had I, but I'm not sure what the difference would be between a
coal gas oven and one that used natural gas.
Many dangerous appliances were discovered in this exercise and were taken
out of service.
Which suggests that the mere act of doing the conversion has the nice side
effect of getting rid of some old, unsafe equipment.
As well as requiring little processing before use, natural gas is
non-toxic; the carbon monoxide (CO) in town gas made it extremely
poisonous, accidental poisoning and suicide by gas being commonplace.
Poisoning from natural gas appliances is only due to incomplete combustion,
which creates CO, and flue leaks to living accommodation. As with town
gas, a small amount of foul-smelling substance (mercaptan) is added to the
gas to indicate to the user that there is a leak or an unlit burner, the
gas having no odor of its own.
Which makes it clear that natural gas is, indeed, safer than town gas,
since it contains no CO. To be honest, this surprised me, since I would
have thought that methane (the primary component of what we call "natural
gas") as itself poisonous, but apparently, such is not the case.
Thanks, Kenny.
David Carson
2020-03-10 13:38:51 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
https://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=92319314
Anderson says that suicide is an overwhelmingly impulsive act. He cites a study of survivors that said only 13 percent reported thinking about committing suicide for eight hours or longer; 70 percent said they thought about it for less than an hour; and a whopping 24 percent said the idea had occurred to them less than five minutes before their attempt.
Then why do we so often find a theme of suicide in the lyrics of musicians
and the words of writers who commit it? Why do we look for, and often
find, ex post facto indicators of suicidal tendencies in social media
posts? Why do suicide victims often have previous unsuccessful attempts?
Why do we have web sites that say things such as:

https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/recognizing-suicidal-behavior#1
Often, a person considering suicide will begin to put his or her personal
business in order. This might include visiting friends and family members,
giving away personal possessions, making a will, and cleaning up his or
her room or home. Some people will write a note before committing suicide.
Some will buy a firearm or other means like poison.

and

From 50% to 75% of those considering suicide will give someone -- a friend
or relative -- a warning sign. However, not everyone who is considering
suicide will say so, and not everyone who threatens suicide will follow
through with it. Every threat of suicide should be taken seriously.

I am skeptical of this "overwhelmingly impulsive act" theory.

David Carson
--
Dead or Alive Data Base
http://www.doadb.com
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