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Irish poet Brendan Kennelly, 85
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Lenona
2021-10-19 13:59:21 UTC
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https://www.irishtimes.com/culture/books/brendan-kennelly-one-of-country-s-most-popular-poets-dies-aged-85-1.4703009

Brendan Kennelly, one the country’s most popular poets and a former professor of English at Trinity College Dublin, has died aged 85.

Family members confirmed his death on Sunday evening at Aras Mhuire nursing home, Listowel, in his native Co Kerry.

Mr Kennelly was born in Ballylongford, Co Kerry, in 1936, the son of Tim Kennelly, publican and garage proprietor, and his wife, Bridie Ahern, a nurse.

He graduated from Trinity College, wrote his PhD thesis there, and went on to become professor of modern literature at the university.

Mr Kennelly had more than 30 poetry collections published, which captured the many shades and moods of his home county as well as his adopted Dublin home.

He was also a popular broadcaster and made many appearances on radio and television programmes, such as The Late Late Show.

President Michael D Higgins, a friend of Mr Kennelly’s, said his poetry held “a special place in the affections of the Irish people."

"As one of those who had the great fortune of enjoying the gift of friendship with Brendan Kennelly for many years, it is with great sadness that I have heard of his passing,” he said.

“As a poet, Brendan Kennelly had forged a special place in the affections of the Irish people. He brought so much resonance, insight, and the revelation of the joy of intimacy to the performance of his poems and to gatherings in so many parts of Ireland. He did so with a special charm, wit, energy and passion.”

He added that Mr Kennelly’s poetry is “infused with the details and texture of life, its contradictions and moments of celebration including the wry experiences of football and politics”.

Taoiseach Micheál Martin said the country has lost a “great teacher, poet, raconteur; a man of great intelligence and wit”.

He added: “The Irish people loved hearing his voice and reading his poetry.”

Trinity College Dublin’s provost, Prof Linda Doyle, said Mr Kennelly was known to generations of Trinity students as a great teacher and as a warm and encouraging presence on campus.

“His talent for, and love of, poetry came through in every conversation as did his good humour. We have all missed him on campus in recent years as illness often kept him in his beloved Kerry. He is a loss to his much loved family, Trinity and the country,” she said.

Tony Guerin, a close friend of Kennelly’s and a playwright, said he will be remembered in Kerry and elsewhere as “the people’s poet”.

“My relation with Brendan was one of friendship. There are more scholarly people who will assess his contribution and discuss those matters. But he spoke the language of the people. We loved his writing. His eloquence was masterful, whether it was the written word or being interviewed by Gay Byrne,” he said.

Mr Kennelly is survived by his brothers, Alan, Paddy and Kevin, by his sisters, Mary Kenny and Nancy McAuliffe, and his three grandchildren.
His daughter Doodle Kennelly died earlier this year.

Arrangements for a family funeral are expected to be announced shortly.
Lenona
2021-10-19 14:27:56 UTC
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From Benét's Reader's Encyclopedia (ed. 1996):

Born in County Kerry, Kennelly is probably the contemporary Irish poet closest to the legacy of Patrick Kavanagh. In such books as My Dark Fathers (1964), which Kennelly attempts to come to grips imaginatively with Irish history. Cromwell (1983) is a book-length poem sequence about Oliver Cromwell's bloody subjugation of Ireland, and was later adapted for the stage. Kennelly often writes in voice forms but his poetry is rooted in the oral tradition and is noted for its musicality. He has published more than 20 volumes of poetry, as well as novels and translations from Irish.
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