Discussion:
Four Dead In Ohio
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m***@gmail.com
2019-05-04 04:30:37 UTC
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49 years ago today.
d***@gmail.com
2019-05-04 06:35:33 UTC
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OHIO
d***@gmail.com
2019-05-04 06:39:25 UTC
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Neil was sure coming on strong!

Tin soldiers and Nixon's comin'
We're finally on our own
This summer I hear the drummin'
Four dead in Ohio
Gotta get down to it
Soldiers are gunning us down
Should have been done long ago
What if you knew her and
Found her dead on the ground?
How can you run when you know?
Na na-na-na, na-na na-na
Na na-na-na, na-na na
Na na-na-na, na-na na-na
Na na-na-na, na-na na
Gotta get down to it
Soldiers are cutting us down
Should have been done long ago
What if you knew her and
Found her dead on the ground?
How can you run when you know?
Tin soldiers and Nixon's comin'
We're finally on our own
This summer I hear the drummin'
Four dead in Ohio
Four dead in Ohio (Four dead)
Four dead in Ohio (Four)
Four dead in Ohio (How many?)
Four dead in Ohio (How many more?)
Four dead in Ohio (Why?)
Four dead in Ohio (Oh!)
Four dead in Ohio (Four)
Four dead in Ohio (Why?)
Four dead in Ohio (Why?)
Songwriters: NEIL YOUNG
That Derek
2019-05-04 13:00:10 UTC
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Thank you both for posting and amending to this.

I've always observed this occurrence as a solemn day of reflection.

It's such a shame that the Star Wars culture has big-footed this date as National Star Wars Day all in the name of perpetuating a forced and awful pun in which the "May the Force (be with you) into "May the Fourth..."
d***@gmail.com
2019-05-04 14:42:11 UTC
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1970: A protest against the Vietnam War turns deadly at Kent State University in Ohio. National Guardsmen open fire on anti-war students, killing four and injuring nine others.*

*Nothing like killing students protesting peacefully unarmed while exercising their FIRST AMENDMENT RIGHTS GUARANTEED BY OUR CONSTITUTION.

Such a rotten act 😢... Ohio is dead to me.
m***@gmail.com
2019-05-04 16:14:41 UTC
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I know this is long, but....


I was very much affected by the shootings at Kent State University 49 years ago today, May 4, 1970. I was a student at Western Connecticut State University in Danbury. Below is an account about that day from my book "Until The Birds Chirp: Reflections On The Sixties" :

Several months later, I was in Rogers Park again. I spent much of my childhood and teenage years there. It was a place where I played ball, rode my bike, and fell in and out of love. On that day in May, the sky caught my attention. A canopy of cobalt blue swirled overhead with white puffy clouds drifting towards the horizon. The beautiful day almost made me forget why I was there...to plead and pray that the United States withdraw its troops from Southeast Asia.

Four days earlier, Richard Nixon announced to a stunned and war-weary American public that our nation's armed forces had invaded Cambodia. Suddenly, the war expanded from the "Vietnam War" to the "War in Southeast Asia". Perhaps, this had been Nixon’s secret plan all along. The outrage caused by this military action increased antiwar protests in cities and on campuses across the country. Danbury was no exception. In response to Nixon’s invasion of Cambodia, The Committee to End the War marched from the WestConn campus on White Street to the War Memorial Building at Rogers Park. Some people sang John Lennon’s "Give Peace A Chance" while others held signs denouncing the war. As we passed the Danbury Police headquarters, two squad cars following us along our route.

The march was going smoothly until we neared a car dealership with a very large American flag hanging over the sidewalk near the business entrance. A fellow marcher, just ahead of me, tapped the edge of the flag playfully with his index finger as he ducked his head to walk underneath it. A car salesman, standing outside the doorway of the auto showroom, thought the marcher was being disrespectful and began calling us every name in the book. For a few moments, he was ready to jump into our procession with his fists swinging. The patrol car pulled to the curb. The situation had the potential to develop into a very ugly scene. Fortunately, cooler heads prevailed and the rest of the march to Rogers Park continued without incident.

Once we arrived at the War Memorial, we were joined by Danbury High School students and other members of the community. The "Pledge Of Allegiance" was recited “with liberty and justice for some”, speeches were made, and prayers were offered for the end of war and safe return of American soldiers. After the meeting was done, I walked to my house on the other side of the park. I felt secure as I walked over a large stone culvert bridge which was part of the road. My stone mason ancestors, Grandpa Campbell Catone and his father Great-Grandpa Dominick, built the bridge back in the 1930s as part of the New Deal’s WPA projects.

I noticed the deep blue sky fading in the glare of the late afternoon sun. Once home, I switched on my TV to watch the Six O'clock News. That's when I first heard the reports about students murdered on the campus of Kent State University. Jeffrey Miller, Allison Krause, William Schroeder, and Sandra Scheuer were shot and killed by Troop G of the Ohio National Guard. I was shocked, saddened, and angered by their deaths. A phrase began to circulate inside my head. This internal tape loop repeated the phrase...IT COULD HAVE BEEN ME...over and over. Certainly, the situation on the large Kent State campus was more tense and dangerous than the atmosphere on my small college campus in Danbury, but I felt a bond and kinship with the four slain students in Ohio nonetheless. They were exactly my age...19. Jeff and Allison were actively involved in the campus demonstrations at Kent. Jeff and Sandy knew each other and were friends. Sandy, who wanted to be a speech therapist, was walking to her next class when she was killed. Bill was an ROTC student. According to his mother, Bill was becoming skeptical about America's role in Vietnam. He had just completed a test in his ROTC "War Tactics" class when he decided to attend the afternoon rally on campus.

Jeff, Allison, Bill, and Sandy were among a scattered crowd in a parking lot 250-400 feet away from the National Guard. Troop G was moving up a hill, their backs to the students, when, without provocation and as if on command, they turned around, pointed their guns, and fired into the crowd for thirteen seconds. When the shooting stopped, four students were dead and nine were wounded. Dean Kahler was paralyzed for life when a bullet entered his spine. Years later, the Scranton Commission concluded that the gunfire from the Ohio National Guard was "unnecessary, unwarranted and inexcusable."

More recently, in 2007, Alan Canfora, one of those wounded on May 4th, acquired a tape made from a reel-to-reel recorder whose microphone had been placed on a building’s ledge above Troop G. For years this tape was in the possession of the Yale University archives. On the tape, orders to the Guardsmen can be heard as "Right here...Get set...Point...Fire." This refutes the National Guard’s decades long denial that any orders had been given to fire upon the dispersing crowd.

Jeff, Allison, Bill, and Sandy have come to symbolize young Americans exercising their right to disagree with their government's policies. For me, their deaths brought home the message that our country will tolerate protest, but only up to a point…interfere with the war machine and one risks death. On that day, I understood that the war had come home for good. It was no longer limited to American soldiers battling the Viet Cong, or planes bombing North Vietnam. U.S reactionaries wanted to stop their offspring at home...by any means necessary.
David Carson
2019-05-04 18:33:07 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
As we passed the Danbury Police headquarters, two squad cars following us along our route.
?
Post by m***@gmail.com
The march was going smoothly until we neared a car dealership with a very large American flag hanging over the sidewalk near the business entrance. A fellow marcher, just ahead of me, tapped the edge of the flag playfully with his index finger as he ducked his head to walk underneath it.
This sentence doesn't pass the smell test. Something else happened.
m***@gmail.com
2019-05-04 20:59:41 UTC
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Post by David Carson
Post by m***@gmail.com
As we passed the Danbury Police headquarters, two squad cars following us along our route.
?
Post by m***@gmail.com
The march was going smoothly until we neared a car dealership with a very large American flag hanging over the sidewalk near the business entrance. A fellow marcher, just ahead of me, tapped the edge of the flag playfully with his index finger as he ducked his head to walk underneath it.
This sentence doesn't pass the smell test. Something else happened.
If it did, I wasn't aware of it.

Marc

https://www.amazon.com/Until-Birds-Chirp-Reflections-Sixties/dp/1532939035
MJ Emigh
2019-05-04 22:18:17 UTC
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Something else happened.
Post by m***@gmail.com
If it did, I wasn't aware of it.
And if it did, it likely was not of any significance. The people who despised us so much were from the WWII era. They rescued our country for us and could not believe that America could, in any way, be wrong. It's almost understandable, considering what they lived through. It didn't take much to provoke them.
David Carson
2019-05-05 04:08:50 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by David Carson
Post by m***@gmail.com
As we passed the Danbury Police headquarters, two squad cars following us along our route.
?
Post by m***@gmail.com
The march was going smoothly until we neared a car dealership with a very large American flag hanging over the sidewalk near the business entrance. A fellow marcher, just ahead of me, tapped the edge of the flag playfully with his index finger as he ducked his head to walk underneath it.
This sentence doesn't pass the smell test. Something else happened.
If it did, I wasn't aware of it.
How does one tap the edge of a flag playfully with his index finger? What
does that even look like? And who says to himself, "I have to walk under
this flag. I think I'll tap the edge of it playfully with one finger as
I'm ducking my head"?
f***@netzero.net
2019-05-06 22:40:53 UTC
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Post by David Carson
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by David Carson
Post by m***@gmail.com
As we passed the Danbury Police headquarters, two squad cars following us along our route.
?
Post by m***@gmail.com
The march was going smoothly until we neared a car dealership with a very large American flag hanging over the sidewalk near the business entrance. A fellow marcher, just ahead of me, tapped the edge of the flag playfully with his index finger as he ducked his head to walk underneath it.
This sentence doesn't pass the smell test. Something else happened.
If it did, I wasn't aware of it.
How does one tap the edge of a flag playfully with his index finger? What
does that even look like? And who says to himself, "I have to walk under
this flag. I think I'll tap the edge of it playfully with one finger as
I'm ducking my head"?
David, a million heated verbal exchanges went down during the time of the war in Vietnam. This one seems of small consequence. No one died. Save for whatever reparations were due for any damage done to the man's flag, I think this incident should have been and has been forgotten (with apologies to Marc for his heartfelt account of his own experiences on that eternally painful day in 1970).
David Carson
2019-05-07 04:36:40 UTC
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Post by f***@netzero.net
Post by David Carson
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by David Carson
Post by m***@gmail.com
As we passed the Danbury Police headquarters, two squad cars following us along our route.
?
Post by m***@gmail.com
The march was going smoothly until we neared a car dealership with a very large American flag hanging over the sidewalk near the business entrance. A fellow marcher, just ahead of me, tapped the edge of the flag playfully with his index finger as he ducked his head to walk underneath it.
This sentence doesn't pass the smell test. Something else happened.
If it did, I wasn't aware of it.
How does one tap the edge of a flag playfully with his index finger? What
does that even look like? And who says to himself, "I have to walk under
this flag. I think I'll tap the edge of it playfully with one finger as
I'm ducking my head"?
David, a million heated verbal exchanges went down during the time of the war in Vietnam. This one seems of small consequence. No one died. Save for whatever reparations were due for any damage done to the man's flag, I think this incident should have been and has been forgotten (with apologies to Marc for his heartfelt account of his own experiences on that eternally painful day in 1970).
I'm not the one who's selling it for $8.95.
m***@gmail.com
2019-05-07 18:54:16 UTC
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Post by f***@netzero.net
Post by David Carson
Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by David Carson
Post by m***@gmail.com
As we passed the Danbury Police headquarters, two squad cars following us along our route.
?
Post by m***@gmail.com
The march was going smoothly until we neared a car dealership with a very large American flag hanging over the sidewalk near the business entrance. A fellow marcher, just ahead of me, tapped the edge of the flag playfully with his index finger as he ducked his head to walk underneath it.
This sentence doesn't pass the smell test. Something else happened.
If it did, I wasn't aware of it.
How does one tap the edge of a flag playfully with his index finger? What
does that even look like? And who says to himself, "I have to walk under
this flag. I think I'll tap the edge of it playfully with one finger as
I'm ducking my head"?
David, a million heated verbal exchanges went down during the time of the war in Vietnam. This one seems of small consequence. No one died. Save for whatever reparations were due for any damage done to the man's flag, I think this incident should have been and has been forgotten (with apologies to Marc for his heartfelt account of his own experiences on that eternally painful day in 1970).
Perhaps, I should have printed out the first section of the chapter which had to do with the Vietnam Moratorium six months earlier. The flag incident would have made more sense in talking about the anger of the car showroom owner. However, I didn't want to post something too long.

You can go to the Amazon site for my book, and do a "Look Inside" for that...or buy the book. ;-)
Adam H. Kerman
2019-05-04 15:55:22 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
49 years ago today.
A friend was a student at Kent State during the protest. He doesn't like
to talk about it.

This was absurdly cryptic. Couldn't you have said the name of the
university?
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