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Larry ‘The Mole’ Taylor, 77, bassist, canned Heat; Woodstocker; session player (Monkees, JLee Lewis)
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That Derek
2019-08-20 19:11:05 UTC
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http://www.noise11.com/news/canned-heats-larry-the-mole-taylor-has-died-aged-77-20190820

Canned Heat’s Larry ‘The Mole’ Taylor has died aged 77

by Paul Cashmere on August 20, 2019

in News

Larry ‘The Mole’ Taylor, a founding member of Canned Heat has passed away at the age of 77.

Larry was the bass player for Canned Heat. Before Canned Heat he was the session player for The Monkees and before that Jerry Lee Lewis.

Larry played on Tom Waits albums from ‘Heartattack and Vine’ in 1980 through to ‘Bad As Me’ in 2011. He was on John Mayall albums from ‘Empty Rooms’ in 1969 to ‘Rock The Blues Tonight’ in 2012 and all of The Monkees records from ‘The Monkees’ 1966 through to ‘Music Box’ 2001.

He played on albums for Albert King, Solomon Burke, Buddy Guy, Wanda Jackson, Tracy Chapman, Kim Wilson, Charlie Musselwhite, JJ Cale, Ry Cooder, John Lee Hooker, and Boyce & Hart.

Canned Heat were announced to play at Woodstock 50 last week but the show was cancelled.
Terry del Fuego
2019-08-21 13:06:40 UTC
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On Tue, 20 Aug 2019 12:11:05 -0700 (PDT), That Derek
and all of The Monkees records from ‘The Monkees’ 1966
through to ‘Music Box’ 2001.
"Music Box" is a career-spanning compilation. This is like separately
crediting someone's work on a single, on the album from which the
single was pulled and on the later "Greatest Hits".
Peter Cooper
2019-08-23 03:08:36 UTC
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Post by That Derek
http://www.noise11.com/news/canned-heats-larry-the-mole-taylor-has-died-aged-77-20190820
Canned Heat’s Larry ‘The Mole’ Taylor has died aged 77
by Paul Cashmere on August 20, 2019
in News
Larry ‘The Mole’ Taylor, a founding member of Canned Heat has passed away at the age of 77.
Larry was the bass player for Canned Heat. Before Canned Heat he was the session player for The Monkees and before that Jerry Lee Lewis.
Larry played on Tom Waits albums from ‘Heartattack and Vine’ in 1980 through to ‘Bad As Me’ in 2011. He was on John Mayall albums from ‘Empty Rooms’ in 1969 to ‘Rock The Blues Tonight’ in 2012 and all of The Monkees records from ‘The Monkees’ 1966 through to ‘Music Box’ 2001.
He played on albums for Albert King, Solomon Burke, Buddy Guy, Wanda Jackson, Tracy Chapman, Kim Wilson, Charlie Musselwhite, JJ Cale, Ry Cooder, John Lee Hooker, and Boyce & Hart.
Canned Heat were announced to play at Woodstock 50 last week but the show was cancelled.
Please watch The Mole on the job at Woodstock (bass player with the crazy sideburns)

bill van
2019-08-23 06:14:42 UTC
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Post by Peter Cooper
Post by That Derek
http://www.noise11.com/news/canned-heats-larry-the-mole-taylor-has-died-aged-77-20190820
Canned Heat’s Larry ‘The Mole’ Taylor has died aged 77
by Paul Cashmere on August 20, 2019
in News
Larry ‘The Mole’ Taylor, a founding member of Canned Heat has passed
away at the age of 77.
Larry was the bass player for Canned Heat. Before Canned Heat he was
the session player for The Monkees and before that Jerry Lee Lewis.
Larry played on Tom Waits albums from ‘Heartattack and Vine’ in 1980
through to ‘Bad As Me’ in 2011. He was on John Mayall albums from
‘Empty Rooms’ in 1969 to ‘Rock The Blues Tonight’ in 2012 and all of
The Monkees records from ‘The Monkees’ 1966 through to ‘Music Box’ 2001.
He played on albums for Albert King, Solomon Burke, Buddy Guy, Wanda
Jackson, Tracy Chapman, Kim Wilson, Charlie Musselwhite, JJ Cale, Ry
Cooder, John Lee Hooker, and Boyce & Hart.
Canned Heat were announced to play at Woodstock 50 last week but the show was cancelled.
Please watch The Mole on the job at Woodstock (bass player with the
crazy sideburns) http://youtu.be/3doBiU6nN0k
Yes. They got more deeply into blues music than most pop bands of their time.

bill
Terry del Fuego
2019-08-23 12:47:01 UTC
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Post by bill van
Yes. They got more deeply into blues music than most pop bands of their time.
It might even be possible to make a case that it's the other way
around. At least at the beginning, they seemed like more of a blues
band that got into pop.

For some reason, they'd become something of a joke by the late 1970s.
I can remember a record store saying they would buy used vinyl but
explicitly saying they didn't want any Canned Heat!

I've gotten involved with a community radio station over the last
couple years, and am happy to say that Canned Heat is very much on
their playlist. And they dive a bit deeper than just "On the Road
Again".
bill van
2019-08-23 19:16:26 UTC
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Post by Terry del Fuego
Post by bill van
Yes. They got more deeply into blues music than most pop bands of their time.
It might even be possible to make a case that it's the other way
around. At least at the beginning, they seemed like more of a blues
band that got into pop.
For some reason, they'd become something of a joke by the late 1970s.
I can remember a record store saying they would buy used vinyl but
explicitly saying they didn't want any Canned Heat!
I've gotten involved with a community radio station over the last
couple years, and am happy to say that Canned Heat is very much on
their playlist. And they dive a bit deeper than just "On the Road
Again".
As deep as the 1928 Henry Thomas recording of "Going Up the Country"?



bill
Terry del Fuego
2019-08-23 20:38:35 UTC
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Post by bill van
As deep as the 1928 Henry Thomas recording of "Going Up the Country"?
I wish!!!
MJ Emigh
2019-08-23 21:27:20 UTC
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Post by Terry del Fuego
I can remember a record store saying they would buy used vinyl but
Post by Terry del Fuego
explicitly saying they didn't want any Canned Heat!
I suspect that it had more to do with all the junk that was coming out by them. Loads of bootlegs, German pressings of questionable origin, etc.. Remember Record Club of America? We used to join it every few months....you must remember. They put out lots of Canned Heat as if it was genuine record company product. Some of it was good, actually, but usually we'd be getting poor audience recordings or the same content with different covers and titles. Add to that, they were pressing their own copies, so, at best, we got second generation stuff. But, hey.....for a dollar an album, who's gonna complain?
Terry del Fuego
2019-08-26 13:01:56 UTC
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Post by MJ Emigh
Remember Record Club of America? We used to join it every few
months....you must remember. They put out lots of Canned Heat
as if it was genuine record company product.
I don't remember RCoA dealing in bootlegs at all, though the only
cassettes they made that I'm aware of look even worse than what
Columbia House was doing. The "cover art" on the few I have consists
entirely of typewriter font on a white background.

They must have gone a bit more upscale later. A quick search doesn't
turn up any examples of what I'm talking about but I did find an image
of something that looks a lot closer to professional:
<https://www.discogs.com/Elton-John-Madman-Across-The-Water/release/12991027>

I have a few of their vinyl pressings and never noticed a problem, but
given the equipment I was using combined with my level of
"sophistication" at the time, that's not surprising.
Congoleum Breckenridge
2019-08-23 23:07:11 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Terry del Fuego
Post by bill van
Yes. They got more deeply into blues music than most pop bands of their time.
It might even be possible to make a case that it's the other way
around. At least at the beginning, they seemed like more of a blues
band that got into pop.
For some reason, they'd become something of a joke by the late 1970s.
I can remember a record store saying they would buy used vinyl but
explicitly saying they didn't want any Canned Heat!
I've gotten involved with a community radio station over the last
couple years, and am happy to say that Canned Heat is very much on
their playlist. And they dive a bit deeper than just "On the Road
Again".
As deep as the 1928 Henry Thomas recording of "Going Up the Country"?
http://youtu.be/sYy716zmXcM
bill
When you listen to Canned Heat while on Acid:

bill van
2019-08-24 05:48:09 UTC
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Post by Congoleum Breckenridge
Post by bill van
Post by Terry del Fuego
Post by bill van
Yes. They got more deeply into blues music than most pop bands of their time.
It might even be possible to make a case that it's the other way
around. At least at the beginning, they seemed like more of a blues
band that got into pop.
For some reason, they'd become something of a joke by the late 1970s.
I can remember a record store saying they would buy used vinyl but
explicitly saying they didn't want any Canned Heat!
I've gotten involved with a community radio station over the last
couple years, and am happy to say that Canned Heat is very much on
their playlist. And they dive a bit deeper than just "On the Road
Again".
As deep as the 1928 Henry Thomas recording of "Going Up the Country"?
http://youtu.be/sYy716zmXcM
bill
http://youtu.be/nizfvjzQSG8
Reminds me of Leningrad Cowboys Go America: so uncool it's cool.

bill
Dave P.
2019-08-26 06:08:51 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Terry del Fuego
Post by bill van
Yes. They got more deeply into blues music than most pop bands of their time.
It might even be possible to make a case that it's the other way
around. At least at the beginning, they seemed like more of a blues
band that got into pop.
For some reason, they'd become something of a joke by the late 1970s.
I can remember a record store saying they would buy used vinyl but
explicitly saying they didn't want any Canned Heat!
I've gotten involved with a community radio station over the last
couple years, and am happy to say that Canned Heat is very much on
their playlist. And they dive a bit deeper than just "On the Road
Again".
As deep as the 1928 Henry Thomas recording of "Going Up the Country"?
http://youtu.be/sYy716zmXcM
Hill's Stomp

bill van
2019-08-26 06:56:18 UTC
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Post by Dave P.
Post by bill van
Post by Terry del Fuego
Post by bill van
Yes. They got more deeply into blues music than most pop bands of their time.
It might even be possible to make a case that it's the other way
around. At least at the beginning, they seemed like more of a blues
band that got into pop.
For some reason, they'd become something of a joke by the late 1970s.
I can remember a record store saying they would buy used vinyl but
explicitly saying they didn't want any Canned Heat!
I've gotten involved with a community radio station over the last
couple years, and am happy to say that Canned Heat is very much on
their playlist. And they dive a bit deeper than just "On the Road
Again".
As deep as the 1928 Henry Thomas recording of "Going Up the Country"?
http://youtu.be/sYy716zmXcM
Hill's Stomp
http://youtu.be/49PHLJsKlY4
Yeah, that's nice. The spot where rockabilly meets the blues. Stevie
Ray Vaughan
also worked that territory.

bill
Bermuda999
2019-08-26 20:53:03 UTC
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Post by Dave P.
Post by bill van
Post by Terry del Fuego
Post by bill van
Yes. They got more deeply into blues music than most pop bands of their time.
It might even be possible to make a case that it's the other way
around. At least at the beginning, they seemed like more of a blues
band that got into pop.
For some reason, they'd become something of a joke by the late 1970s.
I can remember a record store saying they would buy used vinyl but
explicitly saying they didn't want any Canned Heat!
I've gotten involved with a community radio station over the last
couple years, and am happy to say that Canned Heat is very much on
their playlist. And they dive a bit deeper than just "On the Road
Again".
As deep as the 1928 Henry Thomas recording of "Going Up the Country"?
http://youtu.be/sYy716zmXcM
Hill's Stomp
http://youtu.be/49PHLJsKlY4
"Let's Work Together" (based on Wilbert Harrison's failed-to-chart "Let's Stick Together"

That Derek
2019-08-23 21:42:16 UTC
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Record Club of America <snip> put out lots of Canned Heat as if it was genuine record company product.
How could anybody "bear" this? IMHO, this is the "hite" of arrogance.

Sorry, Mr. Emigh; that's all I've got.
MJ Emigh
2019-08-24 02:22:02 UTC
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Post by That Derek
Sorry, Mr. Emigh; that's all I've got.
Really? Even a Blind Owl could see a Snake circling a Sunflower, but I can't seem to work it into a relevant comment. So, ya' did good.
RH Draney
2019-08-24 04:05:32 UTC
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Post by That Derek
Record Club of America <snip> put out lots of Canned Heat as if it was genuine record company product.
How could anybody "bear" this? IMHO, this is the "hite" of arrogance.
Sorry, Mr. Emigh; that's all I've got.
Once you get past "Goin' Up the Country" and "On the Road Again", the
only Canned Heat recording I can think of is this one:



....r
Terry del Fuego
2019-08-26 12:53:37 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Once you get past "Goin' Up the Country" and "On the Road Again", the
http://youtu.be/Tump-RnEmZg
Wow...just...wow.

Nice (accidental?) "Hair" reference, too.
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