Discussion:
Albert Finney, 82
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Michael OConnor
2019-02-08 15:41:45 UTC
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Just saw on an AOL blurb
Michael OConnor
2019-02-08 15:44:22 UTC
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https://www.aol.com/article/entertainment/2019/02/08/british-actor-albert-finney-dies-at-82/23664831/

British actor Albert Finney dies at 82
The Associated Press
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Feb 8th 2019 9:38AM

LONDON (AP) — British actor Albert Finney, the Academy Award-nominated star of films from "Tom Jones" to "Skyfall," has died at the age of 82.

Finney's family said Friday that he "passed away peacefully after a short illness with those closest to him by his side."

Finney was a rare star who managed to avoid the Hollywood limelight for more than five decades after bursting to international fame in 1963 in the title role of "Tom Jones."

The film gained him the first of five Oscar nominations. Others followed for "Murder on the Orient Express," ''The Dresser," ''Under the Volcano" and "Erin Brockovich."

In later years he brought authority to action movies, including the James Bond thriller "Skyfall" and two of the Bourne films.
Bermuda999
2019-02-09 06:47:26 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
https://www.aol.com/article/entertainment/2019/02/08/british-actor-albert-finney-dies-at-82/23664831/
British actor Albert Finney dies at 82
The Associated Press
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Feb 8th 2019 9:38AM
LONDON (AP) — British actor Albert Finney, the Academy Award-nominated star of films from "Tom Jones" to "Skyfall," has died at the age of 82.
Finney's family said Friday that he "passed away peacefully after a short illness with those closest to him by his side."
Finney was a rare star who managed to avoid the Hollywood limelight for more than five decades after bursting to international fame in 1963 in the title role of "Tom Jones."
The film gained him the first of five Oscar nominations. Others followed for "Murder on the Orient Express," ''The Dresser," ''Under the Volcano" and "Erin Brockovich."
In later years he brought authority to action movies, including the James Bond thriller "Skyfall" and two of the Bourne films.
You gotta think that if they start playing "Danny Boy" at some point during the the funeral, there's gonna be a whole lot of folks diving under the pews or jumpin' out the windows
Michael OConnor
2019-02-09 09:45:21 UTC
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Post by Bermuda999
You gotta think that if they start playing "Danny Boy" at some point during the the funeral, there's gonna be a whole lot of folks diving under the pews or jumpin' out the windows
Great actor with a long career in Hollywood, but never became a star. Not quite cut out to be a leading man, but somehow never became a top-flite character actor either. It seems maybe he never quite got the right role that pushed him to the top, as "Silence of the Lambs" did for Anthony Hopkins. But Albert Finney was always on the periphery, putting out one good performance after another here and there for more than half a century.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-02-09 16:21:38 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
Great actor with a long career in Hollywood, but never became a star.
Not quite cut out to be a leading man, but somehow never became a
top-flite character actor either. It seems maybe he never quite got the
right role that pushed him to the top, as "Silence of the Lambs" did for
Anthony Hopkins. But Albert Finney was always on the periphery, putting
out one good performance after another here and there for more than half
a century.
I disagree. Albert Finney did not have a long career in Hollywood. Many
of the movies he's best known for were UK productions, and he did a lot
of UK television.

He's best known for Tom Jones. Murder on the Orient Express was popular,
but also a UK production.

I had to look it up: The Dresser, the adaptation of the Rnoald Harwood
play, actually was a Hollywood movie although you'd never know it. It
got produced because Peter Yates, the director, had a six-picture deal
with Columbia/Tri-Star.

My guess would be that Erin Brockovich was the biggest Hollywood movie
he was in but he was second lead.

I've glanced at the listings in IMDb for UK television that he's done,
which I'm sure are incomplete. I'll never see any but a few of the
titles sound interesting.

I always thought he and Alan Bates had somewhat similar careers and
wondered if they were ever up for the same roles.
Michael OConnor
2019-02-09 20:18:42 UTC
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Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Michael OConnor
Great actor with a long career in Hollywood, but never became a star.
Not quite cut out to be a leading man, but somehow never became a
top-flite character actor either. It seems maybe he never quite got the
right role that pushed him to the top, as "Silence of the Lambs" did for
Anthony Hopkins. But Albert Finney was always on the periphery, putting
out one good performance after another here and there for more than half
a century.
I disagree. Albert Finney did not have a long career in Hollywood. Many
of the movies he's best known for were UK productions, and he did a lot
of UK television.
He's best known for Tom Jones. Murder on the Orient Express was popular,
but also a UK production.
I had to look it up: The Dresser, the adaptation of the Rnoald Harwood
play, actually was a Hollywood movie although you'd never know it. It
got produced because Peter Yates, the director, had a six-picture deal
with Columbia/Tri-Star.
My guess would be that Erin Brockovich was the biggest Hollywood movie
he was in but he was second lead.
I've glanced at the listings in IMDb for UK television that he's done,
which I'm sure are incomplete. I'll never see any but a few of the
titles sound interesting.
I always thought he and Alan Bates had somewhat similar careers and
wondered if they were ever up for the same roles.
Perhaps I should have rephrased that and said "feature films" instead of "Hollywood", but he was nominated for five Academy Awards in his career, four Best Actors and one Best Supporting, and I can think of other films where he probably should have been nominated for Best Supporting Actor, "Miller's Crossing" and "Big Fish" are two that immediately come to mind. I don't know much about his TV career, but it looks like he had a good mix of British and American films. His work in American films, which I am familiar with, was always nothing less than stellar. I think if he had focused on making feature films in America, he would have been a huge star, but he split his work between England and the US, movies and TV, and still had a pretty damn good career.

I'm going to have to go back and dig out my copy of "Miller's Crossing" this week. I haven't seen it in years and forgot what a fine film that was.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-02-09 21:52:28 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
Post by Adam H. Kerman
Post by Michael OConnor
Great actor with a long career in Hollywood, but never became a star.
Not quite cut out to be a leading man, but somehow never became a
top-flite character actor either. It seems maybe he never quite got the
right role that pushed him to the top, as "Silence of the Lambs" did for
Anthony Hopkins. But Albert Finney was always on the periphery, putting
out one good performance after another here and there for more than half
a century.
I disagree. Albert Finney did not have a long career in Hollywood. Many
of the movies he's best known for were UK productions, and he did a lot
of UK television.
He's best known for Tom Jones. Murder on the Orient Express was popular,
but also a UK production.
I had to look it up: The Dresser, the adaptation of the Rnoald Harwood
play, actually was a Hollywood movie although you'd never know it. It
got produced because Peter Yates, the director, had a six-picture deal
with Columbia/Tri-Star.
My guess would be that Erin Brockovich was the biggest Hollywood movie
he was in but he was second lead.
I've glanced at the listings in IMDb for UK television that he's done,
which I'm sure are incomplete. I'll never see any but a few of the
titles sound interesting.
I always thought he and Alan Bates had somewhat similar careers and
wondered if they were ever up for the same roles.
Perhaps I should have rephrased that and said "feature films" instead of
"Hollywood", but he was nominated for five Academy Awards in his career,
four Best Actors and one Best Supporting, and I can think of other films
where he probably should have been nominated for Best Supporting Actor,
"Miller's Crossing" and "Big Fish" are two that immediately come to
mind.
His performance in Big Fish was fine, but it's really not a movie I
cared for. I've seen it once, in theater, when it was first released,
and never cared to re-watch it on television.

Much of his career, especially as he got older, he shifted between lead,
supporting, or part of an ensemble. It's the best way to have a career,
and I don't get why so many would brand themselves as failures if they
take a good supporting part shortly after having had a starring role.
Post by Michael OConnor
I don't know much about his TV career,
Never seen a single one; just going by the listings. In the UK, given
how small the production market was, the most popular actors were always
willing to go back and forth between movies and tv, whereas in America,
one took a television series, acknowledging that one's movie career was
over, the wrong way to look at things.
Post by Michael OConnor
but it looks like he had a good mix of British and American films.
His work in American films, which I am familiar with, was always nothing
less than stellar. I think if he had focused on making feature films in
America, he would have been a huge star, but he split his work between
England and the US, movies and TV, and still had a pretty damn good
career.
Heh, well, even if that were his desire, it's not really up to him.
Post by Michael OConnor
I'm going to have to go back and dig out my copy of "Miller's Crossing"
this week. I haven't seen it in years and forgot what a fine film that
was.
Good choice
Louis Epstein
2019-02-10 20:45:25 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
Post by Bermuda999
You gotta think that if they start playing "Danny Boy" at some point during the the funeral, there's gonna be a whole lot of folks diving under the pews or jumpin' out the windows
Great actor with a long career in Hollywood, but never became a star. Not quite cut out to be a leading man, but somehow never became a top-flite character actor either. It seems maybe he never quite got the right role that pushed him to the top, as "Silence of the Lambs" did for Anthony Hopkins. But Albert Finney was always on the periphery, putting out one good performance after another here and there for more than half a century.
What made me aware of him was "Scrooge".

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
Adam H. Kerman
2019-02-10 21:08:44 UTC
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Post by Louis Epstein
What made me aware of him was "Scrooge".
My parents took the family to see that movie when it was first released.
Oh my gawd, that was a terrible movie and a dreadful musical. Nevertheless,
I forgave Finney for that.
Terry del Fuego
2019-02-11 14:04:55 UTC
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On Sun, 10 Feb 2019 21:08:44 -0000 (UTC), "Adam H. Kerman"
Post by Adam H. Kerman
My parents took the family to see that movie when it was first released.
Oh my gawd, that was a terrible movie and a dreadful musical. Nevertheless,
I forgave Finney for that.
I remember very little about it other than the opening credits listing
"Color by [somebody]" and "Prints by [somebody else]". I had no idea
at the time what a "print" was and it bugged me for a long time,
probably years.

This came as a shock:
<https://in70mm.com/library/engagements/film/s/scrooge/index.htm>
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