Discussion:
Roger Bannister, 4-minute-mile breaker, 88
(too old to reply)
Bryan Styble
2018-03-04 12:59:34 UTC
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Well, here's a huge one, at least to us lifelong joggers born the same year he so famously clocked 3:59.4 in England on Thursday, May 6, 1954:

Wikipedia editors have added the death on Saturday, March 3rd in Oxford, of Sir Roger Bannister at 88.

BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
c***@aol.com
2018-03-04 14:43:44 UTC
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Because a 4 minute miler has SO much in common with a jogger. Lol.

When I was a kid, Bannister was one of the most famous men on earth. I wonder how many will remember.
Bryan Styble
2018-03-04 15:53:56 UTC
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Well, you're correct to scoff, Cathy:

My earnest-but-slowpoke miles these days clock in at about 16 minutes. But I'm still proud that I finished the Boston Marathon in 1974 (with a SLOOOOWWWW time of 5:22, granted); it has been since high school that I could run a 5:30ish mile; and it was in 1993 that I last mustered a sub-6 mile.

Given G-d or nature cursed this agnostic with a serious ankles-deforming genetic birth defect--which is why fathering a child could never have been an option for me, incidentally--I've always considered it remarkable enough merely that I walked normally. The thankfully-rare condition provided me with ankle tendons of about half-length, with my heels consequently never once touching the ground while walking until quite-scary surgery corrected the problem at age 4. Had I not been doubly lucky to be both born during a century when such surgeries were becoming routine as well as into a middle-class American family, er, well-heeled enough to afford the operation...

Well, had I instead born in, say, ancient Greek society, I would have surely been abandoned to die as a newborn at a high elevation somewhere, leaving that imagined variation of Styble in toto clocking in at 3 or 4 days, rather than 23,155-and-counting.

I don't remember many things from age 3 in 1957, but certainly knew Bannister's face from TV somewhere, his surname as well and that besting a 4-minute mile wasn't just another footrace. I don't suppose I knew at age 3 the names of more than three Englishmen--including Churchill and Edmund Hillary--but Bannister was one of them, and it's fantastic that he enjoyed a lengthy life and thus was able to long experience the glory his breaking the barrier earned him, something many informed trainer professionals through the previous decade were convinced could never be humanly breached.

STYBLE/Florida
c***@aol.com
2018-03-04 16:31:43 UTC
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When I was a kid the big 3 firsts were Bannister, Edmund Hillary, and Lindbergh, then Armstrong came along
d***@gmail.com
2018-03-04 20:24:20 UTC
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Sounds like the 80s.
Sarah Ehrett
2018-03-05 00:11:06 UTC
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Post by c***@aol.com
When I was a kid the big 3 firsts were Bannister, Edmund Hillary, and Lindbergh, then Armstrong came along
All on topic.
MJ Emigh
2018-03-05 03:52:19 UTC
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I don't remember many things from age 3 in 1957, but certainly knew Bannister's face from TV somewhere<
I was thinking about that. I remember discussing him in school, if you can call kindergarten kids talking a "discussion". So, people were still talking about him five years after the event. I'm not sure that would happen today. Villains, we remember and discuss. I think we mostly remember the Good Guys as the answers to trivia questions rather than as a contemporary topic of conversation.
p***@gmail.com
2018-03-05 10:17:29 UTC
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On Sunday, March 4, 2018 at 10:54:00 AM UTC-5, Bryan Styble wrote:

(three bloated self-indulgent paragraphs having nothing to do with Roger Bannister's life or death excised)
Post by Bryan Styble
I don't remember many things from age 3 in 1957, but certainly knew Bannister's face from TV somewhere, his surname as well and that besting a 4-minute mile wasn't just another footrace. I don't suppose I knew at age 3 the names of more than three Englishmen--including Churchill and Edmund Hillary--but Bannister was one of them, and it's fantastic that he enjoyed a lengthy life and thus was able to long experience the glory his breaking the barrier earned him, something many informed trainer professionals through the previous decade were convinced could never be humanly breached.
And, of course, his record stood for 46 days.
RH Draney
2018-03-05 13:38:58 UTC
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Post by p***@gmail.com
(three bloated self-indulgent paragraphs having nothing to do with Roger Bannister's life or death excised)
Post by Bryan Styble
I don't remember many things from age 3 in 1957, but certainly knew Bannister's face from TV somewhere, his surname as well and that besting a 4-minute mile wasn't just another footrace. I don't suppose I knew at age 3 the names of more than three Englishmen--including Churchill and Edmund Hillary--but Bannister was one of them, and it's fantastic that he enjoyed a lengthy life and thus was able to long experience the glory his breaking the barrier earned him, something many informed trainer professionals through the previous decade were convinced could never be humanly breached.
And, of course, his record stood for 46 days.
One of his records..."fastest time in the mile", 46 days..."first to run
a mile in under four minutes", his in perpetuity....r
c***@aol.com
2018-03-05 14:09:56 UTC
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All that matters is breaking the The record, not how long he held it.
p***@gmail.com
2018-03-06 05:05:01 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by p***@gmail.com
(three bloated self-indulgent paragraphs having nothing to do with Roger Bannister's life or death excised)
Post by Bryan Styble
I don't remember many things from age 3 in 1957, but certainly knew Bannister's face from TV somewhere, his surname as well and that besting a 4-minute mile wasn't just another footrace. I don't suppose I knew at age 3 the names of more than three Englishmen--including Churchill and Edmund Hillary--but Bannister was one of them, and it's fantastic that he enjoyed a lengthy life and thus was able to long experience the glory his breaking the barrier earned him, something many informed trainer professionals through the previous decade were convinced could never be humanly breached.
And, of course, his record stood for 46 days.
One of his records..."fastest time in the mile", 46 days..."first to run
a mile in under four minutes", his in perpetuity....r
Post by p***@gmail.com
(three bloated self-indulgent paragraphs having nothing to do with Roger Bannister's life or death excised)
Post by Bryan Styble
I don't remember many things from age 3 in 1957, but certainly knew Bannister's face from TV somewhere, his surname as well and that besting a 4-minute mile wasn't just another footrace. I don't suppose I knew at age 3 the names of more than three Englishmen--including Churchill and Edmund Hillary--but Bannister was one of them, and it's fantastic that he enjoyed a lengthy life and thus was able to long experience the glory his breaking the barrier earned him, something many informed trainer professionals through the previous decade were convinced could never be humanly breached.
And, of course, his record stood for 46 days.
One of his records..."fastest time in the mile", 46 days..."first to run
a mile in under four minutes", his in perpetuity....r
Jesus, I wasn't trying to minimize his accomplishments or memory -- just adding a fact that I remembered from that time. My brothers and I eagerly awaited the results of The Miracle Mile and his return to fastest human to mile. Even later, my dad (who was a doctor) was proud that Bannister graduated from medical school and went on to a distinguished career in medicine.
RH Draney
2018-03-06 06:40:03 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
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And, of course, his record stood for 46 days.
One of his records..."fastest time in the mile", 46 days..."first to run
a mile in under four minutes", his in perpetuity....r
Jesus, I wasn't trying to minimize his accomplishments or memory -- just adding a fact that I remembered from that time. My brothers and I eagerly awaited the results of The Miracle Mile and his return to fastest human to mile. Even later, my dad (who was a doctor) was proud that Bannister graduated from medical school and went on to a distinguished career in medicine.
I was justifiably reminded of the day back in 1990 when the temperature
here in Phoenix hit 120F...the previous record of 118 had stood for
something like seventy years, so on June 25th when that record was
broken by *two* full degrees, that was amazing news....

The following day, I couldn't help feeling sorry for all the people who
flew back to their homes in other cities, planning to tell their
grandkids for years to come that they had been in Phoenix on the hottest
day ever, because on the 26th, the record was broken by a further two
degrees to reach 122F....r
Rick B.
2018-03-06 13:00:45 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by p***@gmail.com
Post by RH Draney
Post by p***@gmail.com
And, of course, his record stood for 46 days.
One of his records..."fastest time in the mile", 46 days..."first to
run a mile in under four minutes", his in perpetuity....r
Jesus, I wasn't trying to minimize his accomplishments or memory --
just adding a fact that I remembered from that time. My brothers and I
eagerly awaited the results of The Miracle Mile and his return to
fastest human to mile. Even later, my dad (who was a doctor) was proud
that Bannister graduated from medical school and went on to a
distinguished career in medicine.
I was justifiably reminded of the day back in 1990 when the temperature
here in Phoenix hit 120F...the previous record of 118 had stood for
something like seventy years, so on June 25th when that record was
broken by *two* full degrees, that was amazing news....
The following day, I couldn't help feeling sorry for all the people who
flew back to their homes in other cities, planning to tell their
grandkids for years to come that they had been in Phoenix on the hottest
day ever, because on the 26th, the record was broken by a further two
degrees to reach 122F....r
Similarly, the winter of 1977-78 was the snowiest winter on record in
Chicago, at 82.3 inches, and was said to be the kind of winter that comes
around every 100 years. Then came the winter of 1978-79, and its 89.7
inches...
David Carson
2018-03-06 13:47:23 UTC
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Post by Rick B.
Similarly, the winter of 1977-78 was the snowiest winter on record in
Chicago, at 82.3 inches, and was said to be the kind of winter that comes
around every 100 years. Then came the winter of 1978-79, and its 89.7
inches...
I've lost count of how many 100-year floods we've had in my part of Texas.
The drama queens who talk about the weather on TV realize they've
desensitized us to that phrase, so they described the flooding from
Hurricaine Harvey as 500-year or 1000-year floods. The flood control
expert with the Harris County government actually called it a 50,000-year
flood. And then they all warn us to be prepared for the next one.

David Carson
--
Dead or Alive Data Base
http://www.doadb.com
p***@gmail.com
2018-03-06 23:13:40 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by p***@gmail.com
Post by RH Draney
Post by p***@gmail.com
And, of course, his record stood for 46 days.
One of his records..."fastest time in the mile", 46 days..."first to run
a mile in under four minutes", his in perpetuity....r
Jesus, I wasn't trying to minimize his accomplishments or memory -- just adding a fact that I remembered from that time. My brothers and I eagerly awaited the results of The Miracle Mile and his return to fastest human to mile. Even later, my dad (who was a doctor) was proud that Bannister graduated from medical school and went on to a distinguished career in medicine.
I was justifiably reminded of the day back in 1990 when the temperature
here in Phoenix hit 120F...the previous record of 118 had stood for
something like seventy years, so on June 25th when that record was
broken by *two* full degrees, that was amazing news....
The following day, I couldn't help feeling sorry for all the people who
flew back to their homes in other cities, planning to tell their
grandkids for years to come that they had been in Phoenix on the hottest
day ever, because on the 26th, the record was broken by a further two
degrees to reach 122F....r
That's funny.

I'm also reminded of Chuck Yeager breaking the sound barrier in the X-1 on October 14, 1947 over the Mojave Desert. Six years later the Navy's Scott Crossfield beat the USAF's Yeager to Mach II. That, of course, pissed off Yeager to no end and within 3 weeks he achieved Mach 2.44. Not only did he beat Crossfield, but he did it in time to spoil an elaborate celebration planned for the 50th anniversary of flight in which Crossfield was to be called "the fastest man alive."
Alfalfa Bill
2018-03-07 05:56:20 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
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Post by RH Draney
Post by p***@gmail.com
And, of course, his record stood for 46 days.
One of his records..."fastest time in the mile", 46 days..."first to run
a mile in under four minutes", his in perpetuity....r
Jesus, I wasn't trying to minimize his accomplishments or memory -- just adding a fact that I remembered from that time. My brothers and I eagerly awaited the results of The Miracle Mile and his return to fastest human to mile. Even later, my dad (who was a doctor) was proud that Bannister graduated from medical school and went on to a distinguished career in medicine.
I was justifiably reminded of the day back in 1990 when the temperature
here in Phoenix hit 120F...the previous record of 118 had stood for
something like seventy years, so on June 25th when that record was
broken by *two* full degrees, that was amazing news....
The following day, I couldn't help feeling sorry for all the people who
flew back to their homes in other cities, planning to tell their
grandkids for years to come that they had been in Phoenix on the hottest
day ever, because on the 26th, the record was broken by a further two
degrees to reach 122F....r
That's funny.
I'm also reminded of Chuck Yeager breaking the sound barrier in the X-1 on October 14, 1947 over the Mojave Desert. Six years later the Navy's Scott Crossfield beat the USAF's Yeager to Mach II. That, of course, pissed off Yeager to no end and within 3 weeks he achieved Mach 2.44. Not only did he beat Crossfield, but he did it in time to spoil an elaborate celebration planned for the 50th anniversary of flight in which Crossfield was to be called "the fastest man alive."
Craig Breedlove and the Spirit of America.
p***@gmail.com
2018-03-08 09:27:45 UTC
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Post by Alfalfa Bill
Post by p***@gmail.com
Post by RH Draney
Post by p***@gmail.com
Post by RH Draney
Post by p***@gmail.com
And, of course, his record stood for 46 days.
One of his records..."fastest time in the mile", 46 days..."first to run
a mile in under four minutes", his in perpetuity....r
Jesus, I wasn't trying to minimize his accomplishments or memory -- just adding a fact that I remembered from that time. My brothers and I eagerly awaited the results of The Miracle Mile and his return to fastest human to mile. Even later, my dad (who was a doctor) was proud that Bannister graduated from medical school and went on to a distinguished career in medicine.
I was justifiably reminded of the day back in 1990 when the temperature
here in Phoenix hit 120F...the previous record of 118 had stood for
something like seventy years, so on June 25th when that record was
broken by *two* full degrees, that was amazing news....
The following day, I couldn't help feeling sorry for all the people who
flew back to their homes in other cities, planning to tell their
grandkids for years to come that they had been in Phoenix on the hottest
day ever, because on the 26th, the record was broken by a further two
degrees to reach 122F....r
That's funny.
I'm also reminded of Chuck Yeager breaking the sound barrier in the X-1 on October 14, 1947 over the Mojave Desert. Six years later the Navy's Scott Crossfield beat the USAF's Yeager to Mach II. That, of course, pissed off Yeager to no end and within 3 weeks he achieved Mach 2.44. Not only did he beat Crossfield, but he did it in time to spoil an elaborate celebration planned for the 50th anniversary of flight in which Crossfield was to be called "the fastest man alive."
Craig Breedlove and the Spirit of America.
I thought that was Don Draper and The Blue Flame :)

Bob Martin
2018-03-06 06:36:59 UTC
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(three bloated self-indulgent paragraphs having nothing to do with Roger Ba=
nnister's life or death excised)
I don't remember many things from age 3 in 1957, but certainly knew Banni=
ster's face from TV somewhere, his surname as well and that besting a 4-min=
ute mile wasn't just another footrace. I don't suppose I knew at age 3 the=
names of more than three Englishmen--including Churchill and Edmund Hillar=
y--but Bannister was one of them, and it's fantastic that he enjoyed a leng=
thy life and thus was able to long experience the glory his breaking the ba=
rrier earned him, something many informed trainer professionals through the=
previous decade were convinced could never be humanly breached.
And, of course, his record stood for 46 days.
Sir Edmund Hillary was a New Zealander.
Sarah Ehrett
2018-03-05 00:09:56 UTC
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Post by c***@aol.com
Because a 4 minute miler has SO much in common with a jogger. Lol.
When I was a kid, Bannister was one of the most famous men on earth. I wonder how many will remember.
Count one who remembers him here.
Rick B.
2018-03-04 15:12:03 UTC
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Post by Bryan Styble
Well, here's a huge one, at least to us lifelong joggers born the same
year he so famously clocked 3:59.4 in England on Thursday, May 6,
Wikipedia editors have added the death on Saturday, March 3rd in
Oxford, of Sir Roger Bannister at 88.
https://www.theguardian.com/sport/2018/mar/04/sir-roger-bannister-first-
athlete-to-run-a-mile-in-under-four-minutes-dies-aged-88?CMP=fb_gu

Sir Roger Bannister, first athlete to break four-minute mile, dies aged
88
• Bannister set world record by running mile in 3min 59.4 secs
• Former athlete died in his sleep surrounded by family

Sir Roger Bannister, the first athlete to break the four-minute mile, has
died. He was 88.

A statement released on behalf of his family said he had died in his
sleep “surrounded by his family, who were as loved by him as he was loved
by them. He banked his treasure in the hearts of his friends.”

After Bannister broke the mile record, running three minutes, 59.4
seconds at the Iffley Road sports ground in Oxford on 6 May 1954, he
collapsed into a pack of men, his body feeling “like an exploding
flashbulb”. Then came the words that revived him quicker than any pick-
me-up. “Result of event eight: one mile. First, RG Bannister of Exeter
and Merton colleges, in a time which, subject to ratification, is a new
track record, British record, European record, Commonwealth record and
world record three minutes and …” The rest of the sentence was drowned by
cheers.

Bannister, then a 25-year-old medical student, had broken a mark many
felt was impossible. His record stood for just 46 days but his place in
history was instantly assured.

At the end of 1954, Bannister retired from athletics to pursue his
medical studies full-time and later became a consultant neurologist and
the first chairman of the Sports Council. He was diagnosed with
Parkinson’s disease in 2011, but speaking to the Guardian in 2014 he said
he felt blessed by having lived such a happy life.

“I’m slow and need help walking but I’m taking it with a proper sense of
perspective,” he said. “I have had many opportunities. I also have many
friends and a very supportive family. These are all things I bless myself
for.”

Bannister had intended to keep his record attempt quiet. But his friend
Norris McWhirter later, appropriately, a presenter of Record Breakers,
alerted the press. The BBC sent a lone cameraman, who captured the race
from top of his van parked in the centre of the track. The footage was
quickly sent back to London where it would be shown on that evening’s
Sportsview programme.

Bannister’s performance was more remarkable still given his lack of
training. He would skip his gynaecology lectures, enabling him to run for
45 minutes at lunchtime, and did only 35 miles a week. Six weeks after
his mile feat the Australian John Landy shed a further second off the
record. But later in 1954, when the pair met at the Empire Games in
Vancouver, Bannister emerged triumphant after an epic contest later
describe as the “Miracle Mile”, coming from 15 yards down with a surprise
sprint off the last bend.

Speaking to the Guardian in 2014, Bannister said his record-breaking run
almost did not happen because of the 25mph winds.

“I got to the track at 4.30pm but didn’t decide to race until about half
an hour before it was due to start at 6pm,” he said. “My pacemakers Chris
Brasher and Chris Chataway were getting a little impatient. They were
saying: ‘Make up your mind!’ But it was I who had to do it. I was very
concerned about the weather but when the wind dropped it proved just
possible.”

That day he had had a breakfast of porridge at his flat in Earl’s Court,
west London, then a ham and cheese salad at a friend’s in Oxford for
lunch. In between he spent the morning at hospital, where he sharpened
his spikes on a grindstone in a laboratory, before catching the train to
Oxford.

Back then he talked through the race fluently but dispassionately – the
anger he felt after a false start by Brasher. Then feeling so full of
energy on the first lap that he was shouting: “Faster!”. And then the
fear at the end of the 62.4sec third lap when the record appeared to be
slipping away.
“I heard the lap times as they went by,” he said. “The first was 58. The
half-mile 1.58. But the three-quarters was three minutes and one second
so I knew I had to produce a last lap of under 59.

“I was also unsure whether I should start my finish immediately or wait
another 150 yards and overtake Chataway in the back straight. I decided I
would stay a bit longer and then went. There was plenty of adrenaline
then, I can assure you.”

The current mile world record is held by the Moroccan Hicham El Guerrouj,
who ran 3:43.13 in Rome on 7 July 1999.


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MJ Emigh
2018-03-04 15:13:14 UTC
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I never noticed that mine was not just that same year, but within four days! Although my jogging years have been over for a while, thanks for that little piece of info. I'll put it to use at some point, I'm sure.
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