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Homage to Atal Bihari Vajpayee: 7-day national mourning declared, schools and colleges to remain shut in Delhi
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Dr. Jai Maharaj
2018-08-16 21:26:20 UTC
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Homage to Atal Bihari Vajpayee: 7-day national mourning
declared, schools and colleges to remain shut in Delhi

dnaindia.com
Thursday, August 16, 2018

http://www.dnaindia.com/india/report-homage-to-atal-bihari-vajpayee-7-day-national-mourning-declared-schools-and-colleges-to-remain-shut-in-delhi-2650673

Jai Maharaj, Jyotishi
Om Shanti
http://groups.google.com/group/alt.fan.jai-maharaj
That Derek
2018-08-17 03:56:01 UTC
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Hopefully this 7-day mourning period will be accompanied by a 7-day moratorium of Mumbai-originating telephone scammers and robo-call spammers ... y'know, IRS collection scams, lower your credit card interest buncos, computer virus fix-it cons ...

We all should be so lucky.
Terry del Fuego
2018-08-17 14:50:31 UTC
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On Thu, 16 Aug 2018 20:56:01 -0700 (PDT), That Derek
<***@yahoo.com> wrote:

>Hopefully this 7-day mourning period will be accompanied by a 7-day
>moratorium of Mumbai-originating telephone scammers and robo-call
>spammers ... y'know, IRS collection scams

I love those IRS scams, they're quite therapeutic. Aside from the
amusing ESL charm of the robomessages they leave, I appreciate that
the scam only works if they have a functioning phone number at which
they can be called back. That is, called back over and over and over
and over and subjected to whatever obscene, violent or otherwise
disgusting thing I feel like calling them.

I usually try to track down the carrier and get the number
disconnected ASAP, but there's always a window where they can still be
harassed.
David Carson
2018-08-20 18:43:51 UTC
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On Fri, 17 Aug 2018 07:50:31 -0700, Terry del Fuego
<***@hotmail.com> wrote:

>On Thu, 16 Aug 2018 20:56:01 -0700 (PDT), That Derek
><***@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>>Hopefully this 7-day mourning period will be accompanied by a 7-day
>>moratorium of Mumbai-originating telephone scammers and robo-call
>>spammers ... y'know, IRS collection scams
>
>I love those IRS scams, they're quite therapeutic. Aside from the
>amusing ESL charm of the robomessages they leave, I appreciate that
>the scam only works if they have a functioning phone number at which
>they can be called back. That is, called back over and over and over
>and over and subjected to whatever obscene, violent or otherwise
>disgusting thing I feel like calling them.
>
>I usually try to track down the carrier and get the number
>disconnected ASAP, but there's always a window where they can still be
>harassed.

For whatever reason, Youtube decided to start recommending videos to me of
hackers calling back the number from the "Your computer is infected" scam.
After watching four of them, I was struck by how identical all of the
dialogue went on the Indian side, and even the techniques, such as opening
a command prompt, running dir /s, and telling the mark that they are
running a scan on the computer, or opening Event Viewer, filtering for
errors and warnings (of which there are always many that are totally
inconsequential) and exclaiming - and I quote - "Oh, my goodness!"

The hackers are on a virtual machine when they call in, so they aren't at
risk of anything. One of them tricked the scammer into downloading a
payload called "banking information" that gave him remote access to all 38
computers on the scammers' network, after which he deleted the %system32%
folder on them all. Another hacker said he would pay $499 for the lifetime
protection plan, and the scammer logged into his own Paypal-like account
on the hacker's supposedly infected computer to collect his payment. Once
he got logged in, the hacker disconnected his remote session!

Anyway, the real lesson I learned from this that there's something anyone
can do to get back at them, without being a hacker, having a virtual
machine, or any of that. Call the phone number, and when the scammer tells
you go to logmein.com or wherever and gives you a remote session code, you
can report that code to logmein.com as belonging to a scammer and get that
account closed. Of course, I don't know how much this affects them in the
long run.

David Carson
--
Dead or Alive Data Base
http://www.doadb.com
Terry del Fuego
2018-08-21 23:47:15 UTC
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On Mon, 20 Aug 2018 13:43:51 -0500, David Carson <***@neosoft.com>
wrote:

>The hackers are on a virtual machine when they call in, so they aren't at
>risk of anything. One of them tricked the scammer into downloading a
>payload called "banking information" that gave him remote access to all 38
>computers on the scammers' network, after which he deleted the %system32%
>folder on them all.

You can't hear me laughing out loud right now, but trust me, I did.
Sometimes the best justice is poetic. I'm really glad people are doing
stuff like this, it's a lot more constructive than my limited ability
to call them back and talk like...well, you know, like me.

>Another hacker said he would pay $499 for the lifetime
>protection plan, and the scammer logged into his own Paypal-like account
>on the hacker's supposedly infected computer to collect his payment. Once
>he got logged in, the hacker disconnected his remote session!

Again, hearty laughter.

>Anyway, the real lesson I learned from this that there's something anyone
>can do to get back at them, without being a hacker, having a virtual
>machine, or any of that. Call the phone number, and when the scammer tells
>you go to logmein.com or wherever and gives you a remote session code, you
>can report that code to logmein.com as belonging to a scammer and get that
>account closed. Of course, I don't know how much this affects them in the
>long run.

That's good to know. I've also learned that you can report Bitcoin
addresses that are being used for scams, though it's necessary to sign
up for an account to do so and I'm not sure I trust whoever's on the
other end.
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