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<Archive Obituary> Jack Coombs (April 15th 1957)
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Bill Schenley
2007-04-15 05:01:01 UTC
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Jack Coombs, 74, Ballplayer, Dies;

Pitcher in Both Leagues, 1906 to 1920,
Won 5 Series Games --Coached at Duke U.

Held Shutout Record

Photo:
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FROM: The New York Times (April 16th 1957) ~
By The United Press International

PALESTINE, Tex., April 15

Jack (Colby Jack) Coombs, pitcher on some of
the late Connie Mack's great Philadelphia Athletic
teams, died at his home of a heart attack today.
His age was 74.

Mr. Coombs, a right-hander, had a lifetime record
of 159 victories and 112 losses in a major league
career that began in 1906 with the Athletics and
ended in 1920 with the Detroit Tigers. He was
non-playing managers of the Philadelphia Phillies in
1919.

Mr. Coombs retired from baseball a few years ago
after having coached at Duke University for
twenty-six years. Before then he had been a coach
at Rice Institute, Princeton University and Williams
College.

A key member of the Athletics staff that included
Chief Bender and Eddie Plank, he had his best
season in 1910, when he won thirty-one games and
lost nine. He beat the Chicago Cubs three times in the
World Series that year and went on the next year to
post a 28-13 record, and score another World Series
win, over Christy Mathewson and the New York
Giants.

He won twenty-one games the following season but
his career was interrupted by a sore arm in 1913 and
1914 and in 1915 he was traded to the Brooklyn
Dodgers. He won fifteen games in 1915 and thirteen
in 1916 and the next season divided his time on the
mound and in the outfield.

Mr. Coombs was born in Le Grand, Iowa. He was
acquired by Mr. Mack after attending Colby College.

In 1916, he scored another World Series victory, for
the Dodgers over the Boston Red Sox, to give him a
5-0 series record.

Mr. Coombs had extensive real estate holding in the
downtown district of Palestine. He had held baseball
clinics for youngsters.

Held Shutout Record

Of Mr. Coombs thirty-one victories in 1910, thirteen
were by shutouts. This still stands as a league record.
In 1906 he pitched and won a twenty-four inning
contest against the Boston Red Sox, the longest
complete game in American League history.
---
Photo:
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1910 Sporting News M101-2 baseball card:
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Stats: http://www.baseball-reference.com/c/coombja01.shtml
b***@gmail.com
2018-04-18 16:45:06 UTC
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Good to read. My grandmother used to tell me about "Uncle Jack" all the time. She was so proud. She was a "Coombs" also, one of many, from Kennebunk, Maine. His family's home in Kennebunk still stands. I live 3 or 4 minutes away from it, on the same road. I have seen photos of him, along with family, after a day of hunting, standing in their front yard with their daily catch. Wish I had know him.
Post by Bill Schenley
Jack Coombs, 74, Ballplayer, Dies;
Pitcher in Both Leagues, 1906 to 1920,
Won 5 Series Games --Coached at Duke U.
Held Shutout Record
http://desmoinesregister.com/sports/extras/hall/art/coombs-mug.jpg
FROM: The New York Times (April 16th 1957) ~
By The United Press International
PALESTINE, Tex., April 15
Jack (Colby Jack) Coombs, pitcher on some of
the late Connie Mack's great Philadelphia Athletic
teams, died at his home of a heart attack today.
His age was 74.
Mr. Coombs, a right-hander, had a lifetime record
of 159 victories and 112 losses in a major league
career that began in 1906 with the Athletics and
ended in 1920 with the Detroit Tigers. He was
non-playing managers of the Philadelphia Phillies in
1919.
Mr. Coombs retired from baseball a few years ago
after having coached at Duke University for
twenty-six years. Before then he had been a coach
at Rice Institute, Princeton University and Williams
College.
A key member of the Athletics staff that included
Chief Bender and Eddie Plank, he had his best
season in 1910, when he won thirty-one games and
lost nine. He beat the Chicago Cubs three times in the
World Series that year and went on the next year to
post a 28-13 record, and score another World Series
win, over Christy Mathewson and the New York
Giants.
He won twenty-one games the following season but
his career was interrupted by a sore arm in 1913 and
1914 and in 1915 he was traded to the Brooklyn
Dodgers. He won fifteen games in 1915 and thirteen
in 1916 and the next season divided his time on the
mound and in the outfield.
Mr. Coombs was born in Le Grand, Iowa. He was
acquired by Mr. Mack after attending Colby College.
In 1916, he scored another World Series victory, for
the Dodgers over the Boston Red Sox, to give him a
5-0 series record.
Mr. Coombs had extensive real estate holding in the
downtown district of Palestine. He had held baseball
clinics for youngsters.
Held Shutout Record
Of Mr. Coombs thirty-one victories in 1910, thirteen
were by shutouts. This still stands as a league record.
In 1906 he pitched and won a twenty-four inning
contest against the Boston Red Sox, the longest
complete game in American League history.
---
http://www.baseballlibrary.com/baseballlibrary/photos/headshots/Coombs_Jack.gif
http://www.baseball-reference.com/bpv/images/3/3b/Coombsjack.jpg
Stats: http://www.baseball-reference.com/c/coombja01.shtml
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