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Wallace Tripp - RIP
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D.D.Degg
2018-09-09 22:02:05 UTC
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Illustrator and author Wally Tripp has passed away.

Wallace “Wally” Tripp is an American Illustrator best known for his children’s books and Pawprints Greeting Cards. Wally was born in Boston in 1940 and grew up in rural New Hampshire and New York. Drawing was a favorite childhood past-time that he never gave up…In spite of his all-consuming devotion to EC Comics, Skookum Indians, RC model aviation, Middle-English poetry and Classical music, Wally managed to illustrate over 60 books and create 600 cards for Pawprints.

http://www.dailycartoonist.com/index.php/2018/09/09/wallace-tripp-rip/
l***@yahoo.com
2018-09-12 17:20:27 UTC
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Thank you. Any chance you could tell me where to go online to find people who would know whether or not horror cartoonist Luis Dominguez is alive? (Preferably without my having to register.)


Lenona.
MJ Emigh
2018-09-12 21:40:02 UTC
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On Wednesday, September 12, 2018 at 12:20:29 PM UTC-5, ***@yahoo.com wrote:
> Thank you. Any chance you could tell me where to go online to find people who would know whether or not horror cartoonist Luis Dominguez is alive? (Preferably without my having to register.)
>
>
> Lenona.

I know that Lambiek has him listed as still living, but they haven't updated since 2011. He would be 95 if that is the case.
D.D.Degg
2018-09-13 11:59:03 UTC
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Lenona wrote:
> Thank you. Any chance you could tell me where to go online to find people who would know whether or not horror cartoonist Luis Dominguez is alive? (Preferably without my having to register.)

I'm as much in the dark as you.

My list of "Senior Strippers", surviving (U.S.) cartoonists age 90 or older,
http://www.dailycartoonist.com/index.php/2018/06/27/senior-strippers/
lists Dominguez with an asterisk noting I was unable to confirm his status
(along with editor/compiler Phil Hirsch).

And a recent quick search still leaves it a question mark.

D.D.Degg
l***@yahoo.com
2018-09-13 19:29:27 UTC
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On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 7:59:05 AM UTC-4, D.D.Degg wrote:
> Lenona wrote:
> > Thank you. Any chance you could tell me where to go online to find people who would know whether or not horror cartoonist Luis Dominguez is alive? (Preferably without my having to register.)
>
> I'm as much in the dark as you.
>
> My list of "Senior Strippers", surviving (U.S.) cartoonists age 90 or older,
> http://www.dailycartoonist.com/index.php/2018/06/27/senior-strippers/
> lists Dominguez with an asterisk noting I was unable to confirm his status
> (along with editor/compiler Phil Hirsch).
>
> And a recent quick search still leaves it a question mark.
>
> D.D.Degg


Nice link, thanks.

Aside from searching in Google Images for Dominguez's name plus "cartoonist" or "horror," there are three 1970s books where you can see his non-horror work (btw, his name is sometimes misspelled as "Louis"):

Incredible But True! aka Incredible! by Kevin MacFarland

https://www.bidorbuy.co.za/item/308529651/INCREDIBLE_BUT_TRUE_by_Kevin_McFarland_Illustrated_by_Luis_Dominguez_Published_1978.html
(a few pictures; scroll to the bottom)

More Incredible! by MacFarland

The Mammoth Book of Trivia, ed. James Meyers (this draws heavily from the first two books, plus Triviata: A Compendium of Useless Information by Timothy T. Fullerton, and includes tiny, neat ink illustrations by Harold Montiel & unknown Victorian illustrators)


Re the third book, I said elsewhere:

Most things only take a few sentences, but some stories take two pages and include a large illustration. The ones like that I remember include the story of the "wolf girls" from India named Amala & Kamala, the story of Houdini, the story of the bloodthirsty Mongol ruler Tamerlane, and three stories about very strong men who were 1) a 19th-century English prisoner, John Gully, who rises to stardom as a boxer and doesn't fall 2) Milo of Crotona, a huge Greek athlete from 6th-century B.C. who carried an ox, and later, got trapped and devoured by wolves 3) Montreal's Louis Cyr who had four horses harnessed to him - two to each arm - and they couldn't budge him. (Those were all from the MacFarland books, as it turned out.)




Re Wallace Tripp: I suspect he was best known, among children, for his pictures for "Come Back, Amelia Bedelia."

Or maybe for Patricia Thomas' book, "'Stand Back,' Said the Elephant, "I'm Going to Sneeze!,'"

Both were from 1971. (He also illustrated "Play Ball, Amelia Bedelia" in 1972.)

He was 78 and lived in Peterborough, New Hampshire. (Also in Jaffrey, NH.)

From "Contemporary Authors":

"Recipient of Boston Globe-Horn Book award for illustrations, 1977, for Granfa' Grig Had a Pig; A Great Big Ugly Man Came Up and Tied His Horse to Me appeared on the American Library Association's notable book list."

http://www.wallytripp.com/

http://characterdesignnotes.blogspot.com/2011/03/wallace-tripp.html
(2011 blog on his work)

https://www.google.com/search?q=wallace+tripp+books&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjA8efN_bXdAhUNMd8KHWZDDCQQ_AUICygC&biw=1266&bih=812
(book covers)

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/263954.Wallace_Tripp
(reader reviews)

https://www.facebook.com/pages/category/Artist/Wallace-Tripp-51779654410/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wallace_Tripp

https://www.google.com/search?q=wallace+tripp&source=lnms&tbm=vid&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjQ8MDZ_7XdAhWul-AKHQ4yDUMQ_AUIDygA&biw=1266&bih=812
(videos of his books)

https://www.publishersweekly.com/pw/by-topic/childrens/childrens-authors/article/63972-q-a-with-ben-tripp.html
(PW interview with zombie-novelist son, Ben Tripp)



WRITINGS:
SELF-ILLUSTRATED; JUVENILES

The Tale of a Pig: A Caucasian Folktale, McGraw, 1968.
(Compiler) A Great Big Ugly Man Came Up and Tied His Horse to Me: A Book of Nonsense Verse, Little, Brown, 1973.
My Uncle Podger: A Picture Book (based on a passage fromThree Men in a Boat by Jerome K. Jerome), Little, Brown, 1975.
(Compiler) Granfa' Grig Had a Pig and Other Rhymes without Reason from Mother Goose (verse), Little, Brown, 1976.
Sir Toby Jingle's Beastly Journey (Junior Literary Guild selection), Coward, 1976.
(Compiler) Rhymes without Reason from Mother Goose, World's Work, 1980.
(Compiler) Marguerite, Go Wash Your Feet! (verse), Houghton, 1985.

ILLUSTRATOR; CHILDREN'S FICTION

Reginald B. Hegarty, Rope's End, Houghton, 1965.
Lisa Tsarelka, Stay Away From My Lawnmower, Houghton, 1965.
Ruth Christoffer Carlsen, Henrietta Goes West, Houghton, 1966.
Carlsen, Hildy and the Cuckoo Clock, Houghton, 1966.
Ilse Kleberger, Grandmother Oma, Atheneum, 1967.
Andrew Lang, editor, Read Me Another Fairy Tale, Grosset, 1967.
Katherine E. Miller, Saint George: A Christmas Mummers' Play, Houghton, 1967.
Gerald Dumas, Rabbits Rafferty, Houghton, 1968.
Carlsen, Sam Bottleby, Houghton, 1968.
Felice Holman, The Holiday Rat, and the Utmost Mouse (short stories), Norton, 1969.
John Erwin, Mrs. Fox, Simon & Schuster, 1969.
Scott Corbett, The Baseball Bargain, Little, Brown, 1970.
Tom Paxton, Jennifer's Rabbit, Putnam, 1970.
Rene Guillot, Little Dog Lost, translated by Joan Selby-Lowndes, Lothrup, 1970.
Betty Brock, No Flying in the House, Harper, 1970.
Ferdinand N. Monjo, Pirates in Panama, Simon & Schuster, 1970.
Robert Sidney Bigelow, Stubborn Bear, Little, Brown, 1970.
Julian Bagley, Candle-Lighting Time in Bodidalee (folktales), foreword by Alfred V. Frankenstein, American Heritage Publishing Co., 1971.
Peggy Parish, Come Back, Amelia Bedelia, Harper, 1971.
Victor Sharoff, The Heart of the Wood, Coward, 1971.
Marguerita Rudolph, adapter, The Magic Egg, and Other Folk Stories of Rumania, Little, Brown, 1971.
Peter Hallard, Puppy Lost in Lapland, F. Watts, 1971.
Patricia Thomas, "Stand Back," Said the Elephant, "I'm Going to Sneeze!," Lothrup, 1971.
Miriam Anne Bourne, Tigers in the Woods, Coward, 1971.
Tony Johnston, The Adventures of Mole and Troll, Putnam, 1972.
Cynthia Jameson, adapter, Catofy the Clever (folktale), Coward, 1972.
Liesel Moak Skorpen, Old Arthur, Harper, 1972.
Parish, Play Ball, Amelia Bedelia, Harper, 1972.
Carolyn Lane, The Voices of Greenwillow Pond, Houghton, 1972.
Boris Vladimirovich Zakhoder, The Crocodile's Toothbrush, translated by Marguerita Rudolph, McGraw, 1973.
Malcolm Hall, Headlines, (Junior Literary Guild selection), Coward, 1973.
Johnston, Mole and Troll Trim the Tree, (Junior Literary Guild selection), Putnam, 1974, revised edition, 1980.
Jan Wahl, Pleasant Fieldmouse's Halloween Party, Putnam, 1974.
Robert Fremlin, Three Friends, Little, Brown, 1975.
Ernest Lawrence Thayer, Casey at the Bat: A Ballad of the Republic, Sung in the Year 1888 (verse), Coward, 1978.
Hilaire Belloc, The Bad Child's Book of Beasts, revised edition, Sparhawk, 1982.

OTHER

Wallace Tripp's Wurst Seller, (humor for adults), Sparhawk, 1981.
Marguerite, Go Wash Your Feet, Houghton Mifflin (Boston, MA), 1985.



Lenona.
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