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Robert Osborne, TCM movie maven and onetime actor, 84
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Bryan Styble
2017-03-06 19:51:15 UTC
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TCM reported the demise due to undisclosed causes of its genial and genteel lead host earlier today...and by coincidence, just hours after I stumbled upon him via YouTube as a strapping young actor in a tiny role in the origin episode of "The Beverly Hillbillies", an interesting distinction which I suspect many of the obits will neglect to mention.

BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
Bryan Styble
2017-03-06 20:08:39 UTC
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Though I haven't seen it in years on YouTube and thus can't report the brand of smokes, a stunningly handsome young Osborne was featured in a cigarette TV commercial from the late '50s or early '60s, a mini-drama that was ideal for his easygoing manner.

One thing I expect the obits to feature prominently is the remarkable story of how Osborne parlayed his acquaintance with Olivia de Havilland into a re-engineering of his career that eventually brought him stardom at TCM he never got within light-years of in his earlier career.

STYBLE/Florida
c***@aol.com
2017-03-06 20:19:49 UTC
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A truly fine and decent man who will be genuinely missed. RIP.
RH Draney
2017-03-06 21:06:26 UTC
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Post by c***@aol.com
A truly fine and decent man who will be genuinely missed. RIP.
Definitely lock for at least one montage, I should think...wonder if
they'll run a day-long tribute of the movies he appeared in....r
Michael OConnor
2017-03-06 22:04:24 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Definitely lock for at least one montage, I should think...wonder if
they'll run a day-long tribute of the movies he appeared in....r
For the Emmys he is a lock. Not so sure about the Oscars, as you pretty much has to be a member of the Academy. Did critics like Siskel and Ebert get mentioned during the Oscar obit reel? I think for the Oscars they tend to stay just with people who work directly in the film production industry. However, since he appeared in a few movies (looking at his IMDB entry, I never knew he was uncredited in Psycho and Spartacus), I think the Academy will find a way to work him into the obit reel somehow.
c***@aol.com
2017-03-06 22:30:09 UTC
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Robert wrote the history of the Oscars at the invitation of the Academy. It would be shocking if he wasn't included in the montage.
A Friend
2017-03-06 23:04:41 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
Post by RH Draney
Definitely lock for at least one montage, I should think...wonder if
they'll run a day-long tribute of the movies he appeared in....r
For the Emmys he is a lock. Not so sure about the Oscars, as you pretty much
has to be a member of the Academy.
No, you don't.
Post by Michael OConnor
Did critics like Siskel and Ebert get mentioned during the Oscar obit
reel?
Ebert did, three years ago. Siskel did not, but Oscars host Whoopi
Goldberg mentioned him.
Post by Michael OConnor
I think for the Oscars they tend to stay just with people who
work directly in the film production industry. However, since he
appeared in a few movies (looking at his IMDB entry, I never knew he
was uncredited in Psycho and Spartacus), I think the Academy will
find a way to work him into the obit reel somehow.
If he's in there, it'll be because of TCM and the fact that he was
well-liked in the community.
RH Draney
2017-03-07 01:50:20 UTC
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Post by A Friend
Post by Michael OConnor
Did critics like Siskel and Ebert get mentioned during the Oscar obit
reel?
Ebert did, three years ago. Siskel did not, but Oscars host Whoopi
Goldberg mentioned him.
But then Ebert *did* have credits in the actual film industry...I always
enjoyed pointing out whenever he'd put down some movie as absolute trash
that he wrote the screenplay to "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls"....r
Dave Garrett
2017-03-08 00:02:52 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by A Friend
Post by Michael OConnor
Did critics like Siskel and Ebert get mentioned during the Oscar obit
reel?
Ebert did, three years ago. Siskel did not, but Oscars host Whoopi
Goldberg mentioned him.
But then Ebert *did* have credits in the actual film industry...I always
enjoyed pointing out whenever he'd put down some movie as absolute trash
that he wrote the screenplay to "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls"....r
That screenplay contains one of the greatest lines in the history of the
cinema: "Ere this night does wane, you will drink the black sperm of my
vengeance!"
--
Dave
c***@aol.com
2017-03-08 01:07:12 UTC
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The TCM tribute to Bob introduced by Ben M is beautifully emotional.
Sarah Ehrett
2017-03-06 21:11:28 UTC
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On Mon, 6 Mar 2017 11:51:15 -0800 (PST), Bryan Styble
Post by Bryan Styble
TCM reported the demise due to undisclosed causes of its genial and genteel lead host earlier today...and by coincidence, just hours after I stumbled upon him via YouTube as a strapping young actor in a tiny role in the origin episode of "The Beverly Hillbillies", an interesting distinction which I suspect many of the obits will neglect to mention.
BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
I remembered he hosted someplace else before he was with TCM.

From Variety: " Before the launch of TCM, Osborne hosted films on the
Movie Channel from 1986-93."
http://www.msn.com/en-us/tv/news/robert-osborne-tcm-host-and-film-historian-dies-at-84/ar-AAnU43c?OCID=ansmsnnews11
marcus
2017-03-06 23:33:52 UTC
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Post by Bryan Styble
TCM reported the demise due to undisclosed causes of its genial and genteel lead host earlier today...and by coincidence, just hours after I stumbled upon him via YouTube as a strapping young actor in a tiny role in the origin episode of "The Beverly Hillbillies", an interesting distinction which I suspect many of the obits will neglect to mention.
BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
He will be missed tremendously.
That Derek
2017-03-07 03:03:08 UTC
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I always enjoyed pointing out whenever he'd put down some movie as absolute trash that he wrote the screenplay to "Beyond the Valley of the Dolls"....r
Ditto critic/failed actor Rex Reed. "Myra Breckinridge" anybody?
c***@aol.com
2017-03-07 03:42:30 UTC
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Rex Reed is not dead.
p***@gmail.com
2017-03-07 05:16:04 UTC
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Post by c***@aol.com
Rex Reed is not dead.
Neither was Roger Ebert when he made the comments to which RH Draney and That Derek were responding.
Anglo Saxon
2017-03-07 07:28:40 UTC
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Post by That Derek
I always enjoyed pointing out whenever he'd put down some movie as
absolute trash that he wrote the screenplay to "Beyond the Valley of the
Dolls"....r
No kidding! lolol I'm glad I didn't know that when I used to watch
them/him.
Post by That Derek
Ditto critic/failed actor Rex Reed. "Myra Breckinridge" anybody?
That book was huge noise during its day. People actually read and talked
about books back then around the water cooler and at dinner. Nothing had
ever been written like that and Vidal was at his best. I don't think
anyone except intellectuals could see the satire and skewering that made
it so brilliant. Most people just called it a dirty book. hah. But I knew
the movie would stink because it would take a genius to direct and cast it
and that just wasn't happening. Yet. Same with Portnoy's Complaint. Roth
and Vidal broke some doors open and we were lucky to be able to watch the
likes of them on TV interview shows that were actually interesting and
directly pointed to the literate adult.

Rex Reed was fun to watch on morning TV and he was actually a pretty good
critic, considering it was a lost art by then. Gene Shalit was unique,
too. God, please don't keep breaking my little bubbles. :) I hope Shalit
didn't produce Green Door or something.
p***@gmail.com
2017-03-07 06:20:09 UTC
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Post by Bryan Styble
TCM reported the demise due to undisclosed causes of its genial and genteel lead host earlier today...and by coincidence, just hours after I stumbled upon him via YouTube as a strapping young actor in a tiny role in the origin episode of "The Beverly Hillbillies", an interesting distinction which I suspect many of the obits will neglect to mention.
ROBERT OSBORNE: ONE OF A KIND
by Leonard Maltin
March 6, 2017

If ever a man got to live out his dream, it was Robert Osborne. Twenty-there years ago he was hired to be the on-camera host for Turner Classic Movies. He was the perfect man for the job because his enthusiasm was genuine and his knowledge was vast. Yet I don’t think the people at TCM realized how indelibly he would become identified with the network—or how connected his viewers would become with him.

I can testify to this, having watched the reaction of people who traveled from all over the country to attend the TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood. When Robert would appear in the lobby of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel he’d be mobbed like a rock star. He represented everything these fans loved about TCM and what it stood for: a pathway to vintage Hollywood and great movies of the past.

He never could have envisioned such a gig. Robert started out as an actor and wound up in Lucille Ball’s Desilu comedy workshop in the early 1960s. He made a handful of TV appearances and might have gotten by, but he always credited Lucy with giving him life-changing advice: she encouraged him to draw on his encyclopedic knowledge of Hollywood instead of becoming just another working stiff in front of the camera. Eventually he became the official historian of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, compiling and updating a massive coffee-table tome about the history of the Oscars. He also appeared as the official greeter on the Oscar red carpet.

By the time I moved to Los Angeles in the early 1980s he was a fixture on-camera as the entertainment reporter for station KTTV. He found another perfect vehicle when the Hollywood Reporter gave him a column of his own called “Rambling Reporter.” Here he would write about anything that struck his fancy, which usually meant classic, old-school show-business.

Film historian and author Scott Eyman got to know him when Bob purchased a condo in Florida and calls him “a remarkable human being. I never spent time with him without coming away feeling better. He was the kind of friend you read about and hear about but don’t think you’ll ever meet. If you had a problem, it was his problem and he wouldn’t rest until he did something about it. A completely simpatico person.”

He never stopped being a movie-struck kid, even though his years of experience revealed the secrets Hollywood hid from its fans. “Nobody could dish like Bob,” says Eyman. “He knew where all the bodies were and who put them there…but he never got jaded about movies of the 30s, 40s, 50s, or 60s.”

When he moved to Manhattan, he found an ideal apartment on West 57th Street, near Carnegie Hall, in a building that (impossibly) was named The Osborne. It had housed many famous people in the past, including Clifton Webb. Eventually, Robert owned three apartments there: one to live in, one to use as an office, and the other to store his formidable collection of movie memorabilia. (His particular passion: one-sheets for 20th Century Fox films.)

Robert was always kind to me and my family–from the time I first met him as a newcomer to Los Angeles through the many years at TCM. He remained a private person, even to those who knew him well, but he was always impeccably turned out, and just as impeccable in his demeanor with friends and fans alike.

The TCM job was a godsend for him and his audience. As Scott Eyman told me, “This was not a job; it was a mission to him. This is what he was put on this earth to do.” It’s become a cliché to say “he will be missed.” In the case of Robert Osborne, the plain fact is this: no one can or will ever replace him.
marcus
2017-03-07 20:26:56 UTC
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Post by p***@gmail.com
Post by Bryan Styble
TCM reported the demise due to undisclosed causes of its genial and genteel lead host earlier today...and by coincidence, just hours after I stumbled upon him via YouTube as a strapping young actor in a tiny role in the origin episode of "The Beverly Hillbillies", an interesting distinction which I suspect many of the obits will neglect to mention.
ROBERT OSBORNE: ONE OF A KIND
by Leonard Maltin
March 6, 2017
If ever a man got to live out his dream, it was Robert Osborne. Twenty-there years ago he was hired to be the on-camera host for Turner Classic Movies. He was the perfect man for the job because his enthusiasm was genuine and his knowledge was vast. Yet I don’t think the people at TCM realized how indelibly he would become identified with the network—or how connected his viewers would become with him.
I can testify to this, having watched the reaction of people who traveled from all over the country to attend the TCM Classic Film Festival in Hollywood. When Robert would appear in the lobby of the Hollywood Roosevelt Hotel he’d be mobbed like a rock star. He represented everything these fans loved about TCM and what it stood for: a pathway to vintage Hollywood and great movies of the past.
He never could have envisioned such a gig. Robert started out as an actor and wound up in Lucille Ball’s Desilu comedy workshop in the early 1960s. He made a handful of TV appearances and might have gotten by, but he always credited Lucy with giving him life-changing advice: she encouraged him to draw on his encyclopedic knowledge of Hollywood instead of becoming just another working stiff in front of the camera. Eventually he became the official historian of the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences, compiling and updating a massive coffee-table tome about the history of the Oscars. He also appeared as the official greeter on the Oscar red carpet.
By the time I moved to Los Angeles in the early 1980s he was a fixture on-camera as the entertainment reporter for station KTTV. He found another perfect vehicle when the Hollywood Reporter gave him a column of his own called “Rambling Reporter.” Here he would write about anything that struck his fancy, which usually meant classic, old-school show-business.
Film historian and author Scott Eyman got to know him when Bob purchased a condo in Florida and calls him “a remarkable human being. I never spent time with him without coming away feeling better. He was the kind of friend you read about and hear about but don’t think you’ll ever meet. If you had a problem, it was his problem and he wouldn’t rest until he did something about it. A completely simpatico person.”
He never stopped being a movie-struck kid, even though his years of experience revealed the secrets Hollywood hid from its fans. “Nobody could dish like Bob,” says Eyman. “He knew where all the bodies were and who put them there…but he never got jaded about movies of the 30s, 40s, 50s, or 60s.”
When he moved to Manhattan, he found an ideal apartment on West 57th Street, near Carnegie Hall, in a building that (impossibly) was named The Osborne. It had housed many famous people in the past, including Clifton Webb. Eventually, Robert owned three apartments there: one to live in, one to use as an office, and the other to store his formidable collection of movie memorabilia. (His particular passion: one-sheets for 20th Century Fox films.)
Robert was always kind to me and my family–from the time I first met him as a newcomer to Los Angeles through the many years at TCM. He remained a private person, even to those who knew him well, but he was always impeccably turned out, and just as impeccable in his demeanor with friends and fans alike.
The TCM job was a godsend for him and his audience. As Scott Eyman told me, “This was not a job; it was a mission to him. This is what he was put on this earth to do.” It’s become a cliché to say “he will be missed.” In the case of Robert Osborne, the plain fact is this: no one can or will ever replace him.
Excellent.
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