Discussion:
Norman Hutchinson, 79, charismatic artist became successful portraitist of the royal family
Add Reply
Hoodoo
2010-07-10 10:43:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Norman Hutchinson

Norman Hutchinson, who died on June 24 aged 79, was a charismatic artist
who started life in an Indian orphanage but went on to become a
successful portraitist of the royal family, notably producing a picture
of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother wearing the Koh-i-Noor diamond.

Published: 5:48PM BST 09 Jul 2010
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/culture-obituaries/art-obituaries/7882187/Norman-Hutchinson.html

Loading Image...

He was born on October 11 1932 in Calcutta, the illegitimate child of
the Honourable Eric Douglas – a Scottish earl's third son who lived on
an estate near Kalimpong – and his 15 year-old Anglo-Indian servant
Florence.

Hutchinson only discovered his parentage by rifling through the files at
Dr Graham's Homes, a repository for unwanted offspring of the Raj such
as he. He eventually met his mother, in 1985 when she was an widow
living in poverty in Calcutta, but not his father.

His temperament was clear from the start. Hating swimming lessons, for
example, he repeatedly drained the school's small swimming pool to avoid
them – and was never caught. But he did not resent his upbringing.
"Everyone was knocking off their servants," he said later. "But what
would have happened to me if I had stayed with my mother? Pulling a
rickshaw or joining a gang?"

His talent for drawing was also evident at a young age and he received
sporadic encouragement, most notably when the orphanage's patron,
Countess Mountbatten, and Dr Graham, the founder, offered to sit for
him. Edwina Mountbatten, he said, had "beautiful eyes like violet
globes". Both portraits have survived.

Shepherded to Calcutta at 15, he was apprenticed at Inchcape
lithographic press, becoming after a few years head of the studio. But a
book with l00 colour illustrations of European art, the gift of an old
lady, proved decisive. Hutchinson was enthralled. He pored over it
endlessly, igniting a love of the Renaissance which would infuse his
future work, and setting him outside the abstract creeds of his day.
Figurative portraits executed in meticulous detail with pen, pastels
and, later, tempura and poster paint, became his trademark.

He developed a sideline in pastel family portraits. The proceeds, he
later claimed, "furnished my passion for being kind to girls".
Fascinated by women and brought up a Christian among Hindus and
Buddhists, he relished many avatars: madonnas, Salomés, Judiths,
Parvatis, Kalis. But his muse and enduring obsession was Gloria Mulidar.
Gloria's Russo-Indian family had owned a circus, and Hutchinson got to
know her by charming her school's headmistress.

They were married in 1955 and Hutchinson would continue to paint, love,
fight and adore his wife all his life. "She was a fey little thing when
I met her," he said. "Now she's a warrior... an absolute bloody tyrant.
But I'm a strong character, and she never hesitates to say that no one
else would live with me."

In 1959, aged 25, he decamped to London; his wife, her mother and sister
and the couple's two infants in tow. They settled in two rooms in
Kentish Town. The sisters found work as secretaries, and Hutchinson
painted in a corner and scrambled hard for the rare commission. A
breakthrough came in 1963, when a portrait of Gloria playing a flute was
exhibited at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition.

It was followed a year later by a one man show at Upper Grosvenor
Galleries. Three pictures sold. There would not be another London show
for 26 years.

With a family to support Hutchinson was forced into commerce. He started
a small engineering business, specialising in bespoke electrical parts.
It proved a highly lucrative venture and he was able to buy a house in
Muswell Hill. In his autobiography, A Hand to Obey the Demon's Eye
(2000), Hutchinson describes these years, during which his family
battled to make its way, as the happiest period of his life.

But portrait commissions continued to come in and, by the 1980s, had
spread to include the Royal family. He painted the Queen Mother,
describing her face as "a beautiful moon with craters".

Hutchinson had asked for the Queen Mother to wear the famous Koh-i-Noor
diamond – she had been Empress of India after all. It was brought from
the Tower by a brigade of soldiers, causing Her Majesty to observe that
she had only three policemen for her own protection.

By this time the Hutchinsons had bought a pair of run-down farmhouses in
southern France, joining and furnishing them in maharajan splendour,
with a formal garden. Eventually the couple moved there permanently.
Hutchinson's Rolls-Royce, often overloaded with attractive young
mini-skirted occupants, adorned the fronts of many local cafés and discos.

But such self-indulgence, did not, apparently, cause an irreparable rift
with his wife. "She's liberated, I'm liberated," Hutchinson noted.

The Rolls' registration plates bore by chance the initials HC, and,
asked by a patronising English matron what they stood for, Hutchinson
declared triumphantly: "Half Caste!"

In 1988 the couple returned to India after 27 years, thereafter visiting
regularly. There Hutchinson became the moving spirit in building a new
dormitory at Dr Graham's Homes.

Entertaining, often exasperating, Norman Hutchinson viewed the world as
a matador views his bull. He waved a red flag to attract its attention,
but skipped beyond its sharpest blows.

Norman Douglas Hutchinson is survived by Gloria, who became his most
frequent subject, and their three daughters.
--
Trout Mask Replica

KFJC.org, WFMU.org, WMSE.org, or WUSB.org;
because the pigoenholed programming of music channels
on Sirius Satellite, and its internet radio player, suck
g***@orange.fr
2017-12-01 14:27:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Hoodoo
Norman Hutchinson
Norman Hutchinson, who died on June 24 aged 79, was a charismatic artist
who started life in an Indian orphanage but went on to become a
successful portraitist of the royal family, notably producing a picture
of Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother wearing the Koh-i-Noor diamond.
Published: 5:48PM BST 09 Jul 2010
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/obituaries/culture-obituaries/art-obituaries/7882187/Norman-Hutchinson.html
http://i.telegraph.co.uk/telegraph/multimedia/archive/01676/norman-hutchinson_1676104c.jpg
He was born on October 11 1932 in Calcutta, the illegitimate child of
the Honourable Eric Douglas – a Scottish earl's third son who lived on
an estate near Kalimpong – and his 15 year-old Anglo-Indian servant
Florence.
Hutchinson only discovered his parentage by rifling through the files at
Dr Graham's Homes, a repository for unwanted offspring of the Raj such
as he. He eventually met his mother, in 1985 when she was an widow
living in poverty in Calcutta, but not his father.
His temperament was clear from the start. Hating swimming lessons, for
example, he repeatedly drained the school's small swimming pool to avoid
them – and was never caught. But he did not resent his upbringing.
"Everyone was knocking off their servants," he said later. "But what
would have happened to me if I had stayed with my mother? Pulling a
rickshaw or joining a gang?"
His talent for drawing was also evident at a young age and he received
sporadic encouragement, most notably when the orphanage's patron,
Countess Mountbatten, and Dr Graham, the founder, offered to sit for
him. Edwina Mountbatten, he said, had "beautiful eyes like violet
globes". Both portraits have survived.
Shepherded to Calcutta at 15, he was apprenticed at Inchcape
lithographic press, becoming after a few years head of the studio. But a
book with l00 colour illustrations of European art, the gift of an old
lady, proved decisive. Hutchinson was enthralled. He pored over it
endlessly, igniting a love of the Renaissance which would infuse his
future work, and setting him outside the abstract creeds of his day.
Figurative portraits executed in meticulous detail with pen, pastels
and, later, tempura and poster paint, became his trademark.
He developed a sideline in pastel family portraits. The proceeds, he
later claimed, "furnished my passion for being kind to girls".
Fascinated by women and brought up a Christian among Hindus and
Buddhists, he relished many avatars: madonnas, Salomés, Judiths,
Parvatis, Kalis. But his muse and enduring obsession was Gloria Mulidar.
Gloria's Russo-Indian family had owned a circus, and Hutchinson got to
know her by charming her school's headmistress.
They were married in 1955 and Hutchinson would continue to paint, love,
fight and adore his wife all his life. "She was a fey little thing when
I met her," he said. "Now she's a warrior... an absolute bloody tyrant.
But I'm a strong character, and she never hesitates to say that no one
else would live with me."
In 1959, aged 25, he decamped to London; his wife, her mother and sister
and the couple's two infants in tow. They settled in two rooms in
Kentish Town. The sisters found work as secretaries, and Hutchinson
painted in a corner and scrambled hard for the rare commission. A
breakthrough came in 1963, when a portrait of Gloria playing a flute was
exhibited at the Royal Academy Summer Exhibition.
It was followed a year later by a one man show at Upper Grosvenor
Galleries. Three pictures sold. There would not be another London show
for 26 years.
With a family to support Hutchinson was forced into commerce. He started
a small engineering business, specialising in bespoke electrical parts.
It proved a highly lucrative venture and he was able to buy a house in
Muswell Hill. In his autobiography, A Hand to Obey the Demon's Eye
(2000), Hutchinson describes these years, during which his family
battled to make its way, as the happiest period of his life.
But portrait commissions continued to come in and, by the 1980s, had
spread to include the Royal family. He painted the Queen Mother,
describing her face as "a beautiful moon with craters".
Hutchinson had asked for the Queen Mother to wear the famous Koh-i-Noor
diamond – she had been Empress of India after all. It was brought from
the Tower by a brigade of soldiers, causing Her Majesty to observe that
she had only three policemen for her own protection.
By this time the Hutchinsons had bought a pair of run-down farmhouses in
southern France, joining and furnishing them in maharajan splendour,
with a formal garden. Eventually the couple moved there permanently.
Hutchinson's Rolls-Royce, often overloaded with attractive young
mini-skirted occupants, adorned the fronts of many local cafés and discos.
But such self-indulgence, did not, apparently, cause an irreparable rift
with his wife. "She's liberated, I'm liberated," Hutchinson noted.
The Rolls' registration plates bore by chance the initials HC, and,
asked by a patronising English matron what they stood for, Hutchinson
declared triumphantly: "Half Caste!"
In 1988 the couple returned to India after 27 years, thereafter visiting
regularly. There Hutchinson became the moving spirit in building a new
dormitory at Dr Graham's Homes.
Entertaining, often exasperating, Norman Hutchinson viewed the world as
a matador views his bull. He waved a red flag to attract its attention,
but skipped beyond its sharpest blows.
Norman Douglas Hutchinson is survived by Gloria, who became his most
frequent subject, and their three daughters.
--
Trout Mask Replica
KFJC.org, WFMU.org, WMSE.org, or WUSB.org;
because the pigoenholed programming of music channels
on Sirius Satellite, and its internet radio player, suck
Loading...