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US Army Captain Ernest Medina (Ret.), 81, acquitted My Lai Massacre player
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That Derek
2018-05-14 16:07:06 UTC
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Sorry, it's on New York Times, and, quite frankly, he's not worth expending one of my ten free monthly look-ups.

This link will take you to the NYT obits page:

https://www.nytimes.com/section/obituaries
That Derek
2018-05-14 16:18:26 UTC
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Here's an obit that doesn't even mention Vietnam:

http://ehextra.com/Content/OBITUARIES/Obituaries/Article/Ernest-L-Medina/131/63/47048

Ernest L. Medina

Thursday, May 10, 2018 3:00 AM

Ernest L. Medina, Marinette, passed away on May 8, 2018. Ernie was born in Springer, N.M., to Simon and Pauline Medina.

Following his mother’s untimely death shortly after his birth, he was raised by his grandparents in Montrose, Colo. He lied about his age to join the Colorado National Guard at the age of 16, then graduated from Montrose High School and continued serving in the Guard while working for the Forestry Department. For a time, it appeared Ernie would join the Seminary, but instead, in 1956, he elected to enlist in the military. Watching as a Sergeant walked down the line assigning new recruits to a branch of service by pointing and alternately stating “Army, Navy,” Ernie stepped out of line and counted down to himself. Realizing he was slated to be in the Navy he asked to switch places with the man in front of him so he could enlist in the Army. Subsequently he was posted to an assignment in Heilbronn, Germany where, while on furlough in Heidelberg, he met a tall, young, blonde German girl named Baerbel Dechandt. He quickly fell in love and declined an offer to take an exam to go to West Point Military Academy so that he could marry his soul mate. He served in Vietnam where he was awarded our country’s third highest medal, a Silver Star, for bravery.

Ernie and his family settled in Marinette, Wis., where he became vice president of sales for Enstrom Helicopter Corporation. He later joined his wife’s business, Medina Inc., Realtors, where he quickly attempted to take over. Barb savvily allowed him to move into her office and allowed him to believe he was in charge, while she actually maintained control. He later became a member and president of the Rotary Club. He was awarded the Paul Harris Award for his service to the community, an achievement of which he was very proud. Ernie craved time with family, friends, and working in the community. He also enjoyed having an occasional cigar, a good home-brew, trying to fill his endless garage with assorted “collectibles,” and dreaming of restoring an antique Ford Model T and a 1960s VW Bug. He was always busy watching over his wife’s pet cats, dogs and occasional stray raccoon that would stroll through the yard. He built a homemade hang-glider which he used once. He adored all his grandkids. Another of his passions was being a prankster, once pretending to be a duck farmer when buying a down coat and aggravating many a local waitress by asking, “How fluffy are your fluffy pancakes?”

Survivors include his wife, Barbara Medina; sister, Linda Lovato; his cousin who was like a sister to him, Ercelica Salomoni; daughter, Ingrid Medina; sons: Greg (Mary-Catherine) Medina, Cecil (Melanie) Medina; grandchildren: Kyla Philibeck, Sara (Kurt) Kupcho, Matthew (Amy) Philibeck, Christina Basken, Jennifer Medina, Patrick Medina, Andrew Medina and Dakota Medina. He is preceded in death by his grandson, Brian Medina, who gave his life for his country while serving in the Marine Corps.

Visitation will take place at Thielen Funeral Home on Sunday, May 13, from 3 to 5:30 p.m. The vigil prayer service will begin at 5:30 p.m., with Fr. Mark McQuesten presiding. At the visitation there will be a eulogy and a chance to share stories about Ernie. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated for the repose of the soul of Ernie at 11 a.m. on Monday, May 14, at Resurrection Parish, with Fr. Mark McQuesten presiding. The service will be followed by lunch in the parish.

In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the following charities: St Vincent DePaul; The Salvation Army; or the Resurrection Parish, 2607 18th St, Menominee, MI, 49858. Online condolences may be sent at www.thielenfh.com.
c***@aol.com
2018-05-14 16:40:11 UTC
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They should have killed more of them.
A Friend
2018-05-14 16:39:57 UTC
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Post by That Derek
Sorry, it's on New York Times, and, quite frankly, he's not worth expending
one of my ten free monthly look-ups.
Here:


Ernest Medina, Army Captain Acquitted in My Lai Massacre, Dies at 81

By Richard Goldstein
May 13, 2018

Ernest L. Medina, the Army captain who was accused of overall
responsibility for the March 1968 mass killings of unarmed South
Vietnamese men, women and children by troops he commanded in what
became known as the My Lai massacre, but was acquitted at a
court-martial, died on Tuesday in Peshtigo, Wis. He was 81.

His death was confirmed by the Thielen Funeral Home in Marinette, a
nearby town where he had lived. The cause was not given.

On March 16, 1968, a month and a half after North Vietnamese and
Vietcong forces launched the Tet offensive, wide-ranging attacks that
stunned the American military command in the Vietnam War, Captain
Medina and the three platoons of his infantry company entered the
village of My Lai in South Vietnam's south central coast region.

What happened over the hours that followed became one of darkest
chapters of American military history. An Army inquiry ultimately
determined that 347 civilians were killed that day — shot, bayoneted or
blasted with grenades. A Vietnamese memorial erected at the site has
put the toll at 504.

But the mass killings were not exposed until November 1969, when the
independent journalist Seymour Hersh, tipped off to the atrocity, wrote
of it in a series of articles that brought him a Pulitzer Prize for
international reporting.

The revelations were shocking in an America already divided over an
increasingly unpopular war. But Captain Medina and Lieutenant William
L. Calley Jr., who was subsequently convicted of murder at a
court-martial as the leader of the platoon that carried out the
massacre, came to be viewed by many as scapegoats in an unwinnable
conflict.

Captain Medina and his men of Charlie Company, a unit in the 11th
Brigade of the Americal Division, engaged in "search and destroy
operations" in March 1968 aimed at clearing the Vietcong from populated
areas where they were presumed to have taken refuge.

According to Captain Medina's later testimony at Lieutenant Calley's
court-martial, Army intelligence had advised that the villagers of My
Lai (pronounced ME-LYE) would be doing their customary shopping at a
nearby marketplace when the troops arrived. Those left in the village
at that hour would supposedly be Vietcong soldiers who had blended in
with the population.

While Captain Medina remained near his helicopter's landing spot a few
hundred yards outside of My Lai, keeping in radio contact with his men,
Lieutenant Calley, an inexperienced officer, and his equally green
infantrymen rampaged through the village, encountering only unarmed
civilians.

The massacre that unfolded did not conclude until a helicopter pilot,
Chief Warrant Officer Hugh Thompson Jr., hovering with two crewmen to
identify enemy positions by drawing expected Vietcong fire, saw signs
of mass killings, landed in the village, demanded at gunpoint that
Lieutenant Calley halt the attack and alerted higher authorities by
radio.

Lieutenant Calley was convicted of premeditated murder of least 22
civilians at a lengthy court-martial ending in March 1971.

He testified that Captain Medina had ordered him via radio to "get rid
of" what the lieutenant had described as "enemy personnel" whose
detention was slowing his progress through the village.

Captain Medina denied that the conversation took place and his
testimony was corroborated by his radio officer. He testified that in
his pre-assault briefing, he had not generally addressed the issue of
what to do with civilians in the village since he assumed everyone
there would be Vietcong.

But he testified that when one his troopers asked, "Do we kill women
and children?" he replied: "No, you do not kill women and children. You
must use common sense," adding that "if they have a weapon and are
trying to engage you, then you can shoot back."

Lieutenant Calley was sentenced to 20 years in prison but the case
became embroiled in court battles and he spent a little more than three
years confined to barracks or under house arrest at Fort Benning, Ga.,
before being released.

Captain Medina went on trial in September 1971, defended by the
prominent criminal lawyer F. Lee Bailey, as well as a military lawyer.
He was charged with involuntary manslaughter of at least 100 civilians,
the murder of a woman and two counts of assault against a prisoner by
firing twice over his head to frighten him the night after the
massacre.

The defense contended that Captain Medina was unaware of large-scale
killings of defenseless civilians until they had already occurred. The
prosecution argued that the defense account was not credible since
Captain Medina had been in continual radio contact with his platoons.
The court-martial panel of five combat officers returned not guilty
verdicts on all counts after an hour's deliberation.

Following revelations of the massacre in the news media, the Army
undertook an official investigation. Lt. Gen. William R. Peers, who
oversaw it, declared on March 18, 1970, "Our inquiry clearly
established that a tragedy of major proportions occurred there on that
day."

Lieutenant Calley was the only soldier convicted on criminal charges in
connection with the massacre. Maj. Gen. Samuel W. Koster, the commander
of the Americal Division, was found by an Army inquiry to have failed
to investigate reports of the mass killings adequately. He was demoted
one rank, to brigadier general. Col. Oran Henderson, a brigade
commander in the division, stood trial and was acquitted of cover-up
charges. Both had hovered above My Lai in their helicopters during the
massacre but maintained they had been unaware of mass murders.

Ernest Lou Medina was born on Aug. 27, 1936, in Springer, N.M., one of
two children of Simon Medina, a ranch hand, and his wife, Pauline. His
mother died of cancer when he was an infant and his father sent him and
his sister to live with grandparents in Montrose, Colo., while pursuing
work as a sheepherder.

After graduating from high school he enlisted in the Army as a private
in 1956. He later attended Officer Candidate School, was commissioned
as a lieutenant and arrived in Vietnam in December 1967.

In the weeks before My Lai, Lieutenant Calley's platoon had suffered
casualties when his men wandered into a minefield. Captain Medina
rescued survivors, an act for which he was later awarded a Silver Star.

Mr. Medina and Mr. Calley both resigned from the Army after their
court-martials. Mr. Medina settled with his family in Marinette and
worked as a salesman for a helicopter company and a real estate agent.
Mr. Calley joined a family jewelry business in Georgia.

Mr. Medina's survivors include his wife, Barbara; his sons Greg and
Cecil and a daughter, Ingrid Medina; his sister, Linda Lovato, and
eight grandchildren.

In an interview with The Associated Press in 1988, Mr. Medina called
the My Lai killings a "horrendous thing."

"I have regrets for it, but I have no guilt over it because I didn't
cause it," he said. "That's not what the military, particularly the
United States Army, is trained for."

He said that the My Lai killings needed to be viewed in the context of
the Vietnam War.

"There were no front lines," he said. "It was a guerrilla war. It's
something I feel a lot of draftees were not trained for, a lot of the
officers were not trained. I'm talking not just about lieutenants. I'm
talking about senior officers."

"But then again, maybe the war should have never happened," he added.
"I think if everybody were to look at it in hindsight, I'm sure a lot
of the politicians and generals would think of it otherwise. Maybe it
was a war that we should have probably never gotten involved in as
deeply as we did without the will to win it."

http://tinyurl.com/ydy9l788
A Friend
2018-05-14 16:49:53 UTC
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Post by That Derek
Sorry, it's on New York Times, and, quite frankly, he's not worth expending
one of my ten free monthly look-ups.
This one would have been. From 2006:


Hugh Thompson, 62, Who Saved Civilians at My Lai, Dies

By RICHARD GOLDSTEIN
JAN. 7, 2006

Hugh Thompson, an Army helicopter pilot who rescued Vietnamese
civilians during the My Lai massacre, reported the killings to his
superior officers in a rage over what he had seen, testified at the
inquiries and received a commendation from the Army three decades
later, died yesterday in Alexandria, La. He was 62.

The cause was cancer, Jay DeWorth, a spokesman for the Veterans Affairs
Medical Center where Mr. Thompson died, told The Associated Press.

On March 16, 1968, Chief Warrant Officer Thompson and his two crewmen
were flying on a reconnaissance mission over the South Vietnamese
village of My Lai when they spotted the bodies of men, women and
children strewn over the landscape.

Mr. Thompson landed twice in an effort to determine what was happening,
finally coming to the realization that a massacre was taking place. The
second time, he touched down near a bunker in which a group of about 10
civilians were being menaced by American troops. Using hand signals,
Mr. Thompson persuaded the Vietnamese to come out while ordering his
gunner and his crew chief to shoot any American soldiers who opened
fire on the civilians. None did.

Mr. Thompson radioed for a helicopter gunship to evacuate the group,
and then his crew chief, Glenn Andreotta, pulled a boy from a nearby
irrigation ditch, and their helicopter flew him to safety.

Mr. Thompson told of what he had seen when he returned to his base.

"They said I was screaming quite loud," he told U.S. News & World
Report in 2004. "I threatened never to fly again. I didn't want to be a
part of that. It wasn't war."

Mr. Thompson remained in combat, then returned to the United States to
train helicopter pilots. When the revelations about My Lai surfaced, he
testified before Congress, a military inquiry and the court-martial of
Lt. William L. Calley Jr., the platoon leader at My Lai, who was the
only soldier to be convicted in the massacre.

When Mr. Thompson returned home, it seemed to him that he was viewed as
the guilty party.

"I'd received death threats over the phone," he told the CBS News
program "60 Minutes" in 2004. "Dead animals on your porch, mutilated
animals on your porch some mornings when you get up. So I was not a
good guy."

On March 6, 1998, the Army presented the Soldier's Medal, for heroism
not involving conflict with an enemy, to Mr. Thompson; to his gunner,
Lawrence Colburn; and, posthumously, to Mr. Andreotta, who was killed
in a helicopter crash three weeks after the My Lai massacre.

The citation, bestowed in a ceremony at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial
in Washington, said the three crewmen landed "in the line of fire
between American ground troops and fleeing Vietnamese civilians to
prevent their murder."

On March 16, 1998, Mr. Thompson and Mr. Colburn attended a service at
My Lai marking the 30th anniversary of the massacre.

"Something terrible happened here 30 years ago today," Mr. Thompson was
quoted as saying by CNN. "I cannot explain why it happened. I just wish
our crew that day could have helped more people than we did."

Mr. Thompson worked as a veterans' counselor in Louisiana after leaving
military service. A list of his survivors was not immediately
available.

Through the years, he continued to speak out, having been invited to
West Point and other military installations to tell of the moral and
legal obligations of soldiers in wartime.

He was presumably mindful of the ostracism he had faced and the long
wait for that medal ceremony in Washington. As he told The Associated
Press in 2004: "Don't do the right thing looking for a reward, because
it might not come."

https://www.nytimes.com/2006/01/07/us/hugh-thompson-62-who-saved-civilia
ns-at-my-lai-dies.html
e***@aol.com
2018-05-14 19:59:25 UTC
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Post by A Friend
...
On March 6, 1998, the Army presented the Soldier's Medal, for heroism
not involving conflict with an enemy, to Mr. Thompson; to his gunner,
Lawrence Colburn; and, posthumously, to Mr. Andreotta, who was killed
in a helicopter crash three weeks after the My Lai massacre.
The citation, bestowed in a ceremony at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial
in Washington, said the three crewmen landed "in the line of fire
between American ground troops and fleeing Vietnamese civilians to
prevent their murder.
It should be noted that the medal was approved in 1996, but the presentation was delayed due to internal Army politics. The Baltimore Sun noted that sources indicated that even after nearly 30 years, "the Army feared that a public ceremony and the attendant publicity might rekindle interest in My Lai."

Then, in November of 1997, Thompson was given just a few day's notice that the ceremony would take place the following week in a non-public ceremony in a congressman's office and that the other two members of Thompson's helicopter crew would not be so honored.

Thompson objected to the above, wanting a public ceremony and one that included recognition of the two crew members with him that day, Larry Colburn and the late Glenn Andreotta. He mentioned that if his crew members were not so honored, that he would take the medal to the Vietnam Veteran's Memorial and tape the medal to Andreotta's name on the Wall.

Only then was the event rescheduled for a public ceremony at the Vietnam Veteran's Memorial Wall the following March, and all three servicemen were presented with the Soldiers Medals (Andreotta's posthumously).

http://articles.baltimoresun.com/1997-11-29/news/1997333006_1_lai-massacre-soldier-medal-andreotta
Anglo.Saxon
2018-05-14 20:42:10 UTC
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Post by That Derek
Sorry, it's on New York Times, and, quite frankly, he's not worth
expending one of my ten free monthly look-ups.
How young were they making soldiers those days?
A Friend
2018-05-14 21:47:55 UTC
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Post by That Derek
Post by That Derek
Sorry, it's on New York Times, and, quite frankly, he's not worth
expending one of my ten free monthly look-ups.
How young were they making soldiers those days?
Generally speaking, you registered for the draft at 18 and, if you
didn't have an exemption, you were drafted into the Army the following
year. The Army had you for two years. There was also some sort of
representation that you were vulnerable to being called up for the
reserves for another four or five years (I forget which) after that,
but I never heard of anyone getting snagged.

A tour in Vietnam lasted a year.

The Marines also drafted in those days but I'm not sure of the terms.
Kenny McCormack
2018-05-14 22:34:26 UTC
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Post by That Derek
Post by That Derek
Sorry, it's on New York Times, and, quite frankly, he's not worth
expending one of my ten free monthly look-ups.
How young were they making soldiers those days?
I think you're getting at the same thing that was my first reaction on
reading this.

Which is: How come we hear so often about people lying about their age to
get into the Army? Don't they check ID?

I mean, yeah, I get it - things were different back then, but still, they
were pretty good about checking ID to get a drivers license or
(Especially!) to buy a drink. Shouldn't they be at least as careful about
sending people to their deaths???

Shouldn't you have to provide a birth certificate (or at least a valid
driver's license) to get into the army?

Even back then...
--
"I think I understand delicate, but why do I have to wash my hands, and
be standing in cold water when doing it?"

Kaz Kylheku <***@kylheku.com> in comp.lang.c
Anglo.Saxon
2018-05-15 04:01:57 UTC
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(edit)
I swear to God the NYT said he was 66, and they obviously fixed it in
minutes, because I used the link and read it immediately.

Or of course, I'm losing my brain stem. Most likely.
Kenny McCormack
2018-05-15 10:41:12 UTC
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Post by Anglo.Saxon
(edit)
I swear to God the NYT said he was 66, and they obviously fixed it in
minutes, because I used the link and read it immediately.
Oh, I see.

Well, that is certainly a different thing.
Post by Anglo.Saxon
Or of course, I'm losing my brain stem. Most likely.
Happens to us all...
--
Debating creationists on the topic of evolution is rather like trying to
play chess with a pigeon --- it knocks the pieces over, craps on the
board, and flies back to its flock to claim victory.
RH Draney
2018-05-15 12:14:19 UTC
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Post by Anglo.Saxon
(edit)
I swear to God the NYT said he was 66, and they obviously fixed it in
minutes, because I used the link and read it immediately.
Or of course, I'm losing my brain stem. Most likely.
Or perhaps you passed out for fifteen years....r
Anglo.Saxon
2018-05-16 01:36:12 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Anglo.Saxon
(edit)
I swear to God the NYT said he was 66, and they obviously fixed it in
minutes, because I used the link and read it immediately.
Or of course, I'm losing my brain stem. Most likely.
Or perhaps you passed out for fifteen years....r
Did I miss anything? Haw

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