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Raymond Sackler, OxyContin purveyor, Dies at 97
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d***@agent.com
2017-07-22 14:46:10 UTC
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Raymond Sackler, Psychopharmacology Pioneer and
Philanthropist, Dies at 97
By SAM ROBERTS, JULY 19, 2017, NY Times

Dr. Raymond Sackler, a pioneer in psychopharmacology, a medicinal
products entrepreneur and a leading philanthropist whose family made a
fortune from the opioid painkiller OxyContin, died on Monday in
Greenwich, Conn. He was 97.

His death was confirmed by his wife, Beverly.

Dr. Sackler was the last survivor among three brothers — all
psychiatrist sons of Brooklyn grocers — whose scientific and marketing
skills transformed a tiny Greenwich Village company founded in the
19th century into a global pharmaceutical giant known as Purdue
Pharma, now headquartered in Stamford, Conn.

Last year, the Sacklers were ranked 19th among “America’s richest
families” by Forbes magazine, with assets estimated at $18 billion.

They were major benefactors who helped finance the Sackler Wing of the
Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York (home to the Temple of Dendur),
the Freer and Sackler Gallery at the Smithsonian Institution in
Washington, British cultural institutions, schools in Israel and
scores of scientific, academic and cultural programs.

In 1971, one of thousands of minor planets discovered by the
Palomar-Leiden Survey, an American and Dutch joint effort, was named
for Beverly and Raymond Sackler to celebrate their commitment to
astronomical research. Dr. Sackler was knighted by Queen Elizabeth II
in 1995 for his contributions to science and the arts.

Raymond was the middle brother and was regarded as the most retiring.
Arthur, the eldest, died in 1987, Mortimer in 2010.

“Raymond was a tremendous supporter of basic science and of young
people doing research in basic science,” Dr. Phillip A. Sharp, a Nobel
Prize-winning professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology,
said in an email. “His main interest was the intersection of
mathematical, engineering and physical sciences with biomedical
science” — an emerging field known as convergence science.

OxyContin, introduced in 1995, was Purdue Pharma’s breakthrough
palliative for chronic pain. Under a marketing strategy that Arthur
Sackler had pioneered decades earlier, the company aggressively
pressed doctors to prescribe the drug, wooing them with free trips to
pain-management seminars and paid speaking engagements. Sales soared.

By 2001, prescriptions for OxyContin were generating more than $1.5
billion a year — surpassing sales of Viagra — and accounted for some
80 percent of the company’s revenue.

OxyContin, made with a synthetic version of morphine, was said to be
nonaddictive because in the form of long-acting tablets, it released
its active ingredient slowly.

But the time-release effect could be defeated by crushing the tablets
and snorting the powder, or by smoking it, or by adding water and
injecting it — all for an immediate, sometimes heroinlike, high.

Federal regulators accused Purdue Pharma of misleading consumers when
it asserted that OxyContin was less likely than traditional narcotics
to be abused.

In 2007, the company agreed to pay $600 million to resolve the federal
charges, although its executives insisted that they had adequately
informed doctors and consumers about the potential for drug abuse and
had responded quickly to reports of overdose deaths.

They also said they had contributed to independent research on pain to
guard against rampant overprescribing.

“During the past six years, we have implemented changes to our
internal training, compliance and monitoring systems that seek to
assure that similar events do not occur again,” the company said at
the time of the settlement.

Several company officials pleaded guilty to a misdemeanor charge of
misbranding and were fined more than $34 million. The Sacklers
personally were never formally accused of wrongdoing.

Raymond Raphael Sackler was born on Feb. 16, 1920, in Brooklyn to
Isaac Sackler and the former Sophie Ziesel, Jewish immigrants from
Eastern Europe who ran a grocery store.

After graduating from Erasmus Hall High School in Brooklyn, he earned
a bachelor of science degree from New York University in 1938.

At a time when medical schools in New York imposed quotas on the
number of Jewish students they would admit, Raymond Sackler pursued
his medical degree at Anderson College of Medicine in Glasgow, where
he also joined the British Home Guard and served as a plane spotter
during World War II. He graduated from Middlesex University Medical
School in Waltham, Mass. (It closed later in the 1940s.)

In 1944, Dr. Sackler married the former Beverly Feldman, who survives
him. Survivors also include their two sons, Richard and Jonathan.

The brothers founded the Creedmoor Institute of Psychobiological
Studies at the state hospital in Queens Village, N.Y. (Raymond and
Mortimer, who were studying skin burns for the Atomic Energy
Commission there, were dismissed in 1953 when they refused to sign an
Army loyalty oath requiring them to report participants who engaged in
conversations deemed subversive.)

Early on, the three brothers “helped pioneer research of the biology
of psychiatric illnesses,” BMJ (formerly the British Medical Journal)
wrote in 2011, “research that helped open the door decades later
toward drug treatments.”

It was Arthur Sackler, a trailblazer in medical advertising, who
financed the purchase of a small Greenwich Village drug manufacturer,
the Purdue Frederick Company, in 1952, according to the book “Pain
Killer: A ‘Wonder’ Drug’s Trail of Addiction and Death” (2003), by
Barry Meier, a reporter for The New York Times. Raymond and Mortimer
became co-chairmen.

The company’s products included an ear wax remover, a laxative, a
“metabolic cerebral tonic” called Gray’s Glycerine (its formula was 11
percent alcohol) and the antiseptic Betadine, the familiar orange
disinfectant smeared on patients’ skin before surgery. (In 1969, the
astronaut Neil Armstrong decontaminated the Apollo landing module with
Betadine after his moon walk.)

The company began experimenting with generic oxycodone, which was
invented in Germany during World War I, to create a time-release
formula that would spread the analgesic narcotic’s effects over 12
hours and, among other things, allow pain sufferers to sleep through
the night.

Before developing OxyContin, the company, in 1984, created MS Contin,
an extended-release, morphine-based drug to relieve cancer pain.

The Sacklers were benefactors of, among other institutions, the
Sackler School of Graduate Biomedical Sciences at Tufts University,
the Mortimer and Raymond Sackler Institute of Advanced Studies at the
University of Tel Aviv, the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Gallery for
Assyrian Art at the Metropolitan Museum, Leiden University in the
Netherlands, Weill Cornell Medical College in New York, the Columbia
University College of Physicians and Surgeons, the British Museum, and
the Raymond and Beverly Sackler Medical Research Center at the
University of Cambridge School of Clinical Medicine.

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/07/19/business/raymond-sackler-dead-of-purdue-pharma.html
Sarah Ehrett's Lesbian Love Interest
2017-07-24 17:47:11 UTC
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Last year, the Sacklers were ranked 19th among “America’s richest
families” by Forbes magazine, with assets estimated at $18 billion.


Died in disgrace. Lived to be 97 years-old. At what point in his life did he realize he wasn't going to live forever? He certainly realized that his OxyCotin did a large amount of damage to society.

He died owning $18 billion, think of the number of rehab programs he could have funded. The number of orphanages. Instead he funded arts that his victims will never enjoy.

His wealth will cost America for generations. Think about that when there is talk about ending the inheritance tax.
Sarah Ehrett
2017-07-24 19:56:14 UTC
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On Mon, 24 Jul 2017 10:47:11 -0700 (PDT), "Some Delusional Shut-in"
Post by Sarah Ehrett's Lesbian Love Interest
He certainly realized that his OxyCotin did a large amount of damage to society.
Don't you ever get tired of being wrong? OxyContin is an excellent
drug. But, like many other drugs the misuse of it is what does the
damage.

One might think your claims of being a health care worker are bogus
with your lack of rational analysis of the drug.
Michael OConnor
2017-07-24 20:58:21 UTC
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Post by Sarah Ehrett
Don't you ever get tired of being wrong? OxyContin is an excellent
drug. But, like many other drugs the misuse of it is what does the
damage.
I have a roommate who is in chronic and permanent back and spinal pain due to a injury she received in a hospital over ten years ago, and since then she has to take various opiates which are carefully dispensed by pain management specialists, and still she is in pain 24 hours a day every day. (She does not take OxyContin, by the way.) At least three days out of every week, she can't get out of bed to do anything more than to fix herself a cup of coffee or go to the bathroom. At this point she is addicted to the opiates, how could she not be, but if it weren't for the opiates she would have stuck a gun in her mouth many years ago because of the pain. She has become very knowledgeable about opiates because she has taken just about all of them except for fentanyl, which she refuses to take because it is just too dangerous, and she knows that sooner or later her body will give out from all the drug use and her death will be labelled as just another drug overdose.

The moral of the story is, not everybody who takes opiates is just some junkie looking to get high. There are some people who are in legitimate chronic widespread pain for which no other drugs will work, and to them opiates are, like it or not, the drugs of last resort. There are people who get prescriptions to these drugs legally and use them responsibly and do not sell them for quick cash. (My roommate has told me that the opiates and other pain meds she takes would probably be worth nearly two grand a month on the street, but she has never sold nor given one away.) What never gets reported in all these news stories on this "War on Opiates" is how all these crackdowns and new laws are hurting the people who legitimately need these drugs and take them responsibly.
Terry del Fuego
2017-07-24 22:00:15 UTC
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On Mon, 24 Jul 2017 13:58:21 -0700 (PDT), Michael OConnor
Post by Michael OConnor
At this point she is addicted to the opiates
Only in the same sense that diabetics are addicted to insulin.
Post by Michael OConnor
What never gets reported in all these news stories on this "War on Opiates"
is how all these crackdowns and new laws are hurting the people who
legitimately need these drugs and take them responsibly.
It's getting reported, it's just frequently drowned out by
sadomoralist prohibitionist bullshit. It's not just the patients who
are getting screwed, it's also their doctors in some cases. Some
patients are forced to piss in jars to prove they're taking their
prescriptions rather than selling them, because degradation and
humiliation are fun, especially when you're doing it to the least of
them.

There's also a mountain of anecdotes out there regarding people who
found a certain plant helpful in weaning themselves off opiates, but
again politics and sadomoralism scream louder. That *was* changing,
but...

--
Every single Prohibitionist is a willing servant of tyranny and hate,
having but one sole purpose - to make the rest of us suffer their putrid
legacy of incalculable waste and destruction. --"Malcolm"
Sarah Ehrett
2017-07-24 23:32:21 UTC
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On Mon, 24 Jul 2017 15:00:15 -0700, Terry del Fuego
Some patients are forced to piss in jars to prove they're taking their
prescriptions rather than selling them,
That's true for every patient on every visit with my doctor friend in
Pain Management.
because degradation and humiliation are fun, especially when you're doing it to the least of
them.
Well, you eliminate the drug addicts shopping around for scripts. And
you protect the doctor from losing their medical license by writing
scripts for people who don't need the medication.

[ My Dr. friend and I have discussed this topic in length. ]

After they started giving piss tests her practice weeded out *all* of
the illegal attempts to get opiates.
Sarah Ehrett
2017-07-24 23:19:30 UTC
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On Mon, 24 Jul 2017 13:58:21 -0700 (PDT), Michael OConnor
Post by Michael OConnor
Post by Sarah Ehrett
Don't you ever get tired of being wrong? OxyContin is an excellent
drug. But, like many other drugs the misuse of it is what does the
damage.
I have a roommate who is in chronic and permanent back and spinal pain due to a injury she received in a hospital over ten years ago, and since then she has to take various opiates which are carefully dispensed by pain management specialists, and still she is in pain 24 hours a day every day. (She does not take OxyContin, by the way.) At least three days out of every week, she can't get out of bed to do anything more than to fix herself a cup of coffee or go to the bathroom. At this point she is addicted to the opiates, how could she not be, but if it weren't for the opiates she would have stuck a gun in her mouth many years ago because of the pain. She has become very knowledgeable about opiates because she has taken just about all of them except for fentanyl, which she refuses to take because it is just too dangerous, and she knows that sooner or later her body will give out from all the drug use and her death will be labelled as just another drug overdose.
The moral of the story is, not everybody who takes opiates is just some junkie looking to get high. There are some people who are in legitimate chronic widespread pain for which no other drugs will work, and to them opiates are, like it or not, the drugs of last resort. There are people who get prescriptions to these drugs legally and use them responsibly and do not sell them for quick cash. (My roommate has told me that the opiates and other pain meds she takes would probably be worth nearly two grand a month on the street, but she has never sold nor given one away.) What never gets reported in all these news stories on this "War on Opiates" is how all these crackdowns and new laws are hurting the people who legitimately need these drugs and take them responsibly.
I am so very sorry to hear about your roommate's severe chronic pain.
I have a friend who is a Pain Management doctor, MD from Georgetown.
Unless you see it first hand you haven't a clue how these people
suffer. Here in RI doctors are terrified to prescribe any opiates at
all and the government is doing everything they can to deny *anyone*
any decent pain medication. It's shameful. There are indeed those
who legitimately need life long pain medications. Instead of knee
jerk legislation over drug users we need to recognize and help the
chronic pain suffers.
Sarah Ehrett's Lesbian Love Interest
2017-07-26 21:44:16 UTC
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I had a friend, who knew somebody, who overheard that there was the internet.

"A new report from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention found nearly 40 Americans die per day -- about 15,000 per year -- from overdoses of painkillers such as Vicodin and OxyContin, eclipsing the number of deaths caused by heroin and cocaine combined."

Of course there are newspapers:

"Follow the pills and you'll find the overdose deaths.

The trail of painkillers leads to West Virginia's southern coalfields, to places like Kermit, population 392. There, out-of-state drug companies shipped nearly 9 million highly addictive — and potentially lethal — hydrocodone pills over two years to a single pharmacy in the Mingo County town.

Rural and poor, Mingo County has the fourth-highest prescription opioid death rate of any county in the United States.

http://www.wvgazettemail.com/news-health/20161217/drug-firms-poured-780m-painkillers-into-wv-amid-rise-of-overdoses

Oxycotin was marketed as safe, could not be abused, and certainly not addictive. Pruitt Pharmaceutical knew that to be not true. The Sackler family accumulated a fortune of $18 billion.

They donated money to the high arts, ballets and symphony. Not a dime to orphanages. Nothing to rehab. Nothing for education. And nothing for all the misery brought on by their dastardly invention and marketing.

Our prisons are full of thieves who have stolen a pizza or a six-pack of beer, but hardly a cell is occupied by a leach that has sucked out thousands of lives and made great fortunes doing so.
Sarah Ehrett
2017-07-27 03:20:08 UTC
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On Wed, 26 Jul 2017 14:44:16 -0700 (PDT), " Useful Idiot "
Post by Sarah Ehrett's Lesbian Love Interest
I had a friend, who knew somebody, who overheard that there was the internet.
Which might be interesting [only to you ] when you're high on
OxyContin and whiskey. But ~ it addresses where you get your claims
of being a health care worker/ taxi driver/porn film fluffer/defense
contractor.
Sarah Ehrett's Lesbian Love Interest
2017-07-27 19:45:25 UTC
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Sarah, strange you'd go out of your way to give support to a drug dealer, a community nuisance. I suppose you give away cigarettes to children on the holidays. I'd expect as much from such a rabid pro-gun nut. If people are too stupid to avoid addiction from pills prescribed by your doctor, same if people are too stupid not to duck when a legal gun shoots a legal bullet.

What else are you supporting? Puppy mills? Human trafficking? The God given right to litter?
Sarah Ehrett
2017-07-28 00:41:33 UTC
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On Thu, 27 Jul 2017 12:45:25 -0700 (PDT), "health care worker/ taxi
Post by Sarah Ehrett's Lesbian Love Interest
Sarah,
I am correct about your abuse of Oxy and whiskey. I know
*ev-reee-thing* about you.
Post by Sarah Ehrett's Lesbian Love Interest
strange
It can be arranged for you to be picked up again...

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