Discussion:
OScarcast's "In Memoriam" hits and misses
Add Reply
That Derek
2017-02-27 19:53:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
From pop culture blooger MArk Evanier:

http://www.newsfromme.com/?s=the+morning+after

The Morning After

Published Monday, February 27, 2017 at 9:59 AM.


As is usual after an Oscar or Emmy ceremony, people are compiling lists of folks who should have been in the "In Memoriam" reel and weren't. So far, I've seen Gloria DeHaven, Alan Young, Robert Vaughn, John McMartin, Anne Jackson, Steven Hill, Brian Bedford, Tammy Grimes, Rita Gam, Dick Davalos, Patricia Barry, Marvin Kaplan, Ruth Terry, Madeleine Lebeau, Francine York, Van Williams, Douglas Wilmer, Peter Vaughn, Fritz Weaver, Madeleine Sherwood, William Schallert, Charmian Carr, Maggie Blye, James Stacy, Alec McCowen, Burt Kwouk, Barbara Hale, Robert Horton, Jon Polito, Garry Shandling, Larry Drake, Miguel Ferrer, Bill Henderson, Teresa Saldana, Kevin Meaney, Jinpachi Nezu, Joseph Mascolo, Frank Pellegrini, Gil Hill, Peter Brown, Nicole Courcel, Joe Santos, Florence Henderson, Doris Roberts and David Huddleston.

Some of those are arguable, not because the people weren't important but because they weren't important in movies. And I'll bet you a couple of those names were from last year. Still, that's an awfully long list. I don't know why, given all the time the ceremony spends on silly things, they can't spare two minutes more for that segment.

I also wonder if anyone has ever thought to change "In Memoriam" to "In Celebration" and make the segment a bit more upbeat and not so maudlin. Get a presenter with a little energy and charm to come out and say, "Let's pause to remember some of the wonderful, talented men and women we lost this past year…and let's give thanks that we got to know them and their contributions." Having been to many a funeral that was conducted in that frame of mind, I think a lot of people would prefer that.

Guess they're afraid that someone's loved ones would complain a death had been trivialized or not given the seriousness it required. There was though this complaint…

Australian producer Jan Chapman says she was "devastated" when she saw her image used in the Oscars' 2017 In Memoriam segment in place of a picture of her "friend and long-time collaborator" Janet Patterson, who died in October 2015.

But no one's going to pay much attention to that gaffe because they're still talking about the biggie. PricewaterhouseCoopers, the accounting firm that handles the envelopes, released this statement this morning…

We sincerely apologize to Moonlight, La La Land, Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway, and Oscar viewers for the error that was made during the award announcement for best picture. The presenters had mistakenly been given the wrong category envelope and when discovered, was immediately corrected. We are currently investigating how this could have happened, and deeply regret that this occurred.

There's not much to investigate here. They have two representatives backstage who each have a full set of all the envelopes. One of them accidentally handed a duplicate of the Best Actress envelope to Warren Beatty — or to someone who handed it to Warren Beatty — instead of the proper Best Picture envelope. You could prevent this particular mistake by only having one set backstage but it would still be possible to hand out the wrong envelope earlier in the show by getting them out of sequence. And we can all make up scenarios where one envelope is lost and they need a backup.

Folks are debating today how much responsibility Warren Beatty and/or Faye Dunaway had for reading the wrong name. It would have been nice if Mr. Beatty, who obviously noticed something wasn't right, had done something other than show the card to Ms. Dunaway, who read the name. Her confusion is understandable…his, a bit less so. But really, the blame should go to whoever dispensed the wrong envelope and especially to the folks backstage who didn't stop the acceptance speeches immediately.

As I noted, there was at one point a procedure to handle this kind of thing. Did they not still have it in place? Or did someone simply fail to invoke it? Blaming the folks on stage is easy and probably wrong. They're just told where to go and what to say and they don't have a whole lot of command over what's going on.

And Jimmy Kimmel is probably kicking himself that he didn't think to come out and say, "Apparently, Price-Waterhouse was sabotaged by Russian hackers that wanted La La Land to win…"

[It's Derek hereon]"

Mr. Evanier does have a point: Van Williams, William Schallert, Charmian Carr, Robert Horton, Garry Shandling, Larry Drake, Miguel Ferrer, Kevin Meaney, Frank Pellegrini, Gil Hill, Joe Santos, Florence Henderson, and Doris Roberts, are all primarily knpwn for their TV work.

The problem with the "you-can't-include-everybody" dynamic is that corrections are seldom, if ever, made. When Peggy Lee died and was Oscar-excluded, her people complained to the Academy, who in turn made the case that Ms. Lee was primarily known as a singer. Her family cited straight-acting movies in which such as "Pete Kelly's Blues." IIRC, Peggy Lee was not retro-included in the following year's ceremonies.

My solution would be to have TWO "In Memoriam" reel: one rife with techie and behind-the-scenes necrology-ees (make-up, special effects, publicists, etc.) that can be played during the closed, non-televised, Special Awards ceremony, and the traditional one comprised of actors and superstar directors (your Hillers, Wajdas, Babencos, Ciminos, etc.).

It's either that or devising an "In Memoriam" reel that would go on the requisite 10-15 minutes, playing the highlights reel during the Oscarcast, and availing an expanded, unexpurgated, more-inclusive reel on the Academy's website.
c***@aol.com
2017-02-27 20:02:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Charmian Carr is not primarily known for TV. She was Lisl in The Sound Of Music.

Michele Morgan, Guy Hamilton, Madeleine LeBeau, Gloria deHaven are egregious omissions.
That Derek
2017-02-27 20:22:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Charmian Carr made it onto the cathode ray-centric list by mistake. Personally, I w'd've included her on the Oscarcast on the strength of her role as Liesl von Trapp. 'T'was her only major role since Sound/Music was YUUUGE!

Frankly, I'm surprised Jon Polito didn't make the cut as he was part of the Coen Bros.'s stock company.
J.D. Baldwin
2017-02-27 20:42:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by That Derek
The Morning After
I didn't think it would be possible for these clowns to make it any
worse than last year. But, then, it seems I say that every year.

Frankly, this year's TCM In Memoriam segment was a bit weak compared
to previous years, but the worst TCM montage is a billion years ahead
of the best one AMPAS ever aired. If they're not willing to take it
seriously, they should just stop doing it. And if they are willing to
take it seriously, they should just outsource it to TCM.
--
_+_ From the catapult of |If anyone objects to any statement I make, I am
_|70|___:)=}- J.D. Baldwin |quite prepared not only to retract it, but also
\ / ***@panix.com|to deny under oath that I ever made it.-T. Lehrer
***~~~~----------------------------------------------------------------------
t***@iwvisp.com
2017-02-27 21:49:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by That Derek
http://www.newsfromme.com/?s=the+morning+after
The Morning After
Published Monday, February 27, 2017 at 9:59 AM.
As is usual after an Oscar or Emmy ceremony, people are compiling lists of folks who should have been in the "In Memoriam" reel and weren't. So far, I've seen Gloria DeHaven, Alan Young, Robert Vaughn, John McMartin, Anne Jackson, Steven Hill, Brian Bedford, Tammy Grimes, Rita Gam, Dick Davalos, Patricia Barry, Marvin Kaplan, Ruth Terry, Madeleine Lebeau, Francine York, Van Williams, Douglas Wilmer, Peter Vaughn, Fritz Weaver, Madeleine Sherwood, William Schallert, Charmian Carr, Maggie Blye, James Stacy, Alec McCowen, Burt Kwouk, Barbara Hale, Robert Horton, Jon Polito, Garry Shandling, Larry Drake, Miguel Ferrer, Bill Henderson, Teresa Saldana, Kevin Meaney, Jinpachi Nezu, Joseph Mascolo, Frank Pellegrini, Gil Hill, Peter Brown, Nicole Courcel, Joe Santos, Florence Henderson, Doris Roberts and David Huddleston.
Some of those are arguable, not because the people weren't important but because they weren't important in movies. And I'll bet you a couple of those names were from last year. Still, that's an awfully long list. I don't know why, given all the time the ceremony spends on silly things, they can't spare two minutes more for that segment.
I also wonder if anyone has ever thought to change "In Memoriam" to "In Celebration" and make the segment a bit more upbeat and not so maudlin. Get a presenter with a little energy and charm to come out and say, "Let's pause to remember some of the wonderful, talented men and women we lost this past year…and let's give thanks that we got to know them and their contributions." Having been to many a funeral that was conducted in that frame of mind, I think a lot of people would prefer that.
Guess they're afraid that someone's loved ones would complain a death had been trivialized or not given the seriousness it required. There was though this complaint…
Australian producer Jan Chapman says she was "devastated" when she saw her image used in the Oscars' 2017 In Memoriam segment in place of a picture of her "friend and long-time collaborator" Janet Patterson, who died in October 2015.
But no one's going to pay much attention to that gaffe because they're still talking about the biggie. PricewaterhouseCoopers, the accounting firm that handles the envelopes, released this statement this morning…
We sincerely apologize to Moonlight, La La Land, Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway, and Oscar viewers for the error that was made during the award announcement for best picture. The presenters had mistakenly been given the wrong category envelope and when discovered, was immediately corrected. We are currently investigating how this could have happened, and deeply regret that this occurred.
There's not much to investigate here. They have two representatives backstage who each have a full set of all the envelopes. One of them accidentally handed a duplicate of the Best Actress envelope to Warren Beatty — or to someone who handed it to Warren Beatty — instead of the proper Best Picture envelope. You could prevent this particular mistake by only having one set backstage but it would still be possible to hand out the wrong envelope earlier in the show by getting them out of sequence. And we can all make up scenarios where one envelope is lost and they need a backup.
Folks are debating today how much responsibility Warren Beatty and/or Faye Dunaway had for reading the wrong name. It would have been nice if Mr. Beatty, who obviously noticed something wasn't right, had done something other than show the card to Ms. Dunaway, who read the name. Her confusion is understandable…his, a bit less so. But really, the blame should go to whoever dispensed the wrong envelope and especially to the folks backstage who didn't stop the acceptance speeches immediately.
As I noted, there was at one point a procedure to handle this kind of thing. Did they not still have it in place? Or did someone simply fail to invoke it? Blaming the folks on stage is easy and probably wrong. They're just told where to go and what to say and they don't have a whole lot of command over what's going on.
And Jimmy Kimmel is probably kicking himself that he didn't think to come out and say, "Apparently, Price-Waterhouse was sabotaged by Russian hackers that wanted La La Land to win…"
[It's Derek hereon]"
Mr. Evanier does have a point: Van Williams, William Schallert, Charmian Carr, Robert Horton, Garry Shandling, Larry Drake, Miguel Ferrer, Kevin Meaney, Frank Pellegrini, Gil Hill, Joe Santos, Florence Henderson, and Doris Roberts, are all primarily knpwn for their TV work.
The problem with the "you-can't-include-everybody" dynamic is that corrections are seldom, if ever, made. When Peggy Lee died and was Oscar-excluded, her people complained to the Academy, who in turn made the case that Ms. Lee was primarily known as a singer. Her family cited straight-acting movies in which such as "Pete Kelly's Blues." IIRC, Peggy Lee was not retro-included in the following year's ceremonies.
My solution would be to have TWO "In Memoriam" reel: one rife with techie and behind-the-scenes necrology-ees (make-up, special effects, publicists, etc.) that can be played during the closed, non-televised, Special Awards ceremony, and the traditional one comprised of actors and superstar directors (your Hillers, Wajdas, Babencos, Ciminos, etc.).
It's either that or devising an "In Memoriam" reel that would go on the requisite 10-15 minutes, playing the highlights reel during the Oscarcast, and availing an expanded, unexpurgated, more-inclusive reel on the Academy's website.
A similar option would be two reels:

One, including only actors, directors and screenwriters who had achieved a, TBD, level of accomplishment in the industry: won or nominated for an Oscar, associated with X number of films, based on film sales, etc. None of those suggestions are workable but there is a correct combination out there.

And a second reel that includes Reel One and literally everyone else, that would be posted on the Academy's website and elsewhere through social media.

Ray Arthur
Louis Epstein
2017-02-27 22:34:46 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by t***@iwvisp.com
Post by That Derek
The problem with the "you-can't-include-everybody" dynamic is that
corrections are seldom, if ever, made. When Peggy Lee died and was
Oscar-excluded, her people complained to the Academy, who in turn made
the case that Ms. Lee was primarily known as a singer. Her family cited
straight-acting movies in which such as "Pete Kelly's Blues." IIRC,
Peggy Lee was not retro-included in the following year's ceremonies.
My solution would be to have TWO "In Memoriam" reel: one rife with
techie and behind-the-scenes necrology-ees (make-up, special effects,
publicists, etc.) that can be played during the closed, non-televised,
Special Awards ceremony, and the traditional one comprised of actors
and superstar directors (your Hillers, Wajdas, Babencos, Ciminos, etc.).
It's either that or devising an "In Memoriam" reel that would go on
the requisite 10-15 minutes, playing the highlights reel during the
Oscarcast, and availing an expanded, unexpurgated, more-inclusive reel
on the Academy's website.
One, including only actors, directors and screenwriters who had
achieved a, TBD, level of accomplishment in the industry: won or
nominated for an Oscar, associated with X number of films, based on film
sales, etc. None of those suggestions are workable but there is a
correct combination out there.
And a second reel that includes Reel One and literally everyone else,
that would be posted on the Academy's website and elsewhere through
social media.
Ray Arthur
I'm pretty sure they've been maintaining a more extensive set on
their website for a few years now.

But I specifically object to an explicit policy they've also had in
place for a while...they mute the audience and pipe their chosen singer's
performance to the broadcast because they think it's disrespectful to
the less-applauded deceased,but I regard the sincere ebb and flow of
applause as faces widely and selectively beloved come on screen as
beautiful,and essential to making the experience relatable and the
montage watchable.

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
c***@aol.com
2017-02-27 22:44:01 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
You would like the "ebb and flow" of who is the most popular dead person. That's sick.

They don't "mute" the applause. For several years, they've asked the audience to not applaud during the segment.
Louis Epstein
2017-02-28 18:43:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by c***@aol.com
You would like the "ebb and flow" of who is the most popular dead person. That's sick.
I like hearing sincere reactions,for better or worse.
Post by c***@aol.com
They don't "mute" the applause.
They do.You hear nothing but the music track.
Post by c***@aol.com
For several years, they've asked the audience to not applaud during the
segment.
And SHAME ON THEM for that!

My local high school's award night has a similar contemptible policy.
People go to support who they want to,not everybody.

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
c***@aol.com
2017-02-28 19:45:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
You're a very sick person. They don't mute anything. There's a live musical performance during which the audience is silent. You probably applaud at funerals too.

You're a tacky anti homosexual asswipe.

Diner
2017-02-28 04:08:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by That Derek
Mr. Evanier does have a point: Van Williams, William Schallert, Charmian Carr, Robert Horton, Garry Shandling, Larry Drake, Miguel Ferrer, Kevin Meaney, Frank Pellegrini, Gil Hill, Joe Santos, Florence Henderson, and Doris Roberts, are all primarily knpwn for their TV work.
William Schallert may have been more famous for his TV work, but he was in DOZENS of movies.

And it was notable that two SAG presidents (Patty Duke and Ken Howard) made it into the obit reel while Schallert didn't.

But hey, we're talking about a motion picture academy that left Charles Lane, who did something like 250 movies, out of the obit reel a few years ago. If Lane didn't make it, Schallert didn't stand a chance.
chrysotile
2017-02-28 14:02:59 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by That Derek
http://www.newsfromme.com/?s=the+morning+after
The Morning After
Published Monday, February 27, 2017 at 9:59 AM.
As is usual after an Oscar or Emmy ceremony, people are compiling lists of folks who should have been in the "In Memoriam" reel and weren't. So far, I've seen Gloria DeHaven, Alan Young, Robert Vaughn, John McMartin, Anne Jackson, Steven Hill, Brian Bedford, Tammy Grimes, Rita Gam, Dick Davalos, Patricia Barry, Marvin Kaplan, Ruth Terry, Madeleine Lebeau, Francine York, Van Williams, Douglas Wilmer, Peter Vaughn, Fritz Weaver, Madeleine Sherwood, William Schallert, Charmian Carr, Maggie Blye, James Stacy, Alec McCowen, Burt Kwouk, Barbara Hale, Robert Horton, Jon Polito, Garry Shandling, Larry Drake, Miguel Ferrer, Bill Henderson, Teresa Saldana, Kevin Meaney, Jinpachi Nezu, Joseph Mascolo, Frank Pellegrini, Gil Hill, Peter Brown, Nicole Courcel, Joe Santos, Florence Henderson, Doris Roberts and David Huddleston.
Some of those are arguable, not because the people weren't important but because they weren't important in movies. And I'll bet you a couple of those names were from last year. Still, that's an awfully long list. I don't know why, given all the time the ceremony spends on silly things, they can't spare two minutes more for that segment.
I also wonder if anyone has ever thought to change "In Memoriam" to "In Celebration" and make the segment a bit more upbeat and not so maudlin. Get a presenter with a little energy and charm to come out and say, "Let's pause to remember some of the wonderful, talented men and women we lost this past year…and let's give thanks that we got to know them and their contributions." Having been to many a funeral that was conducted in that frame of mind, I think a lot of people would prefer that.
Guess they're afraid that someone's loved ones would complain a death had been trivialized or not given the seriousness it required. There was though this complaint…
Australian producer Jan Chapman says she was "devastated" when she saw her image used in the Oscars' 2017 In Memoriam segment in place of a picture of her "friend and long-time collaborator" Janet Patterson, who died in October 2015.
But no one's going to pay much attention to that gaffe because they're still talking about the biggie. PricewaterhouseCoopers, the accounting firm that handles the envelopes, released this statement this morning…
We sincerely apologize to Moonlight, La La Land, Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway, and Oscar viewers for the error that was made during the award announcement for best picture. The presenters had mistakenly been given the wrong category envelope and when discovered, was immediately corrected. We are currently investigating how this could have happened, and deeply regret that this occurred.
There's not much to investigate here. They have two representatives backstage who each have a full set of all the envelopes. One of them accidentally handed a duplicate of the Best Actress envelope to Warren Beatty — or to someone who handed it to Warren Beatty — instead of the proper Best Picture envelope. You could prevent this particular mistake by only having one set backstage but it would still be possible to hand out the wrong envelope earlier in the show by getting them out of sequence. And we can all make up scenarios where one envelope is lost and they need a backup.
Folks are debating today how much responsibility Warren Beatty and/or Faye Dunaway had for reading the wrong name. It would have been nice if Mr. Beatty, who obviously noticed something wasn't right, had done something other than show the card to Ms. Dunaway, who read the name. Her confusion is understandable…his, a bit less so. But really, the blame should go to whoever dispensed the wrong envelope and especially to the folks backstage who didn't stop the acceptance speeches immediately.
As I noted, there was at one point a procedure to handle this kind of thing. Did they not still have it in place? Or did someone simply fail to invoke it? Blaming the folks on stage is easy and probably wrong. They're just told where to go and what to say and they don't have a whole lot of command over what's going on.
And Jimmy Kimmel is probably kicking himself that he didn't think to come out and say, "Apparently, Price-Waterhouse was sabotaged by Russian hackers that wanted La La Land to win…"
[It's Derek hereon]"
Mr. Evanier does have a point: Van Williams, William Schallert, Charmian Carr, Robert Horton, Garry Shandling, Larry Drake, Miguel Ferrer, Kevin Meaney, Frank Pellegrini, Gil Hill, Joe Santos, Florence Henderson, and Doris Roberts, are all primarily knpwn for their TV work.
The problem with the "you-can't-include-everybody" dynamic is that corrections are seldom, if ever, made. When Peggy Lee died and was Oscar-excluded, her people complained to the Academy, who in turn made the case that Ms. Lee was primarily known as a singer. Her family cited straight-acting movies in which such as "Pete Kelly's Blues." IIRC, Peggy Lee was not retro-included in the following year's ceremonies.
My solution would be to have TWO "In Memoriam" reel: one rife with techie and behind-the-scenes necrology-ees (make-up, special effects, publicists, etc.) that can be played during the closed, non-televised, Special Awards ceremony, and the traditional one comprised of actors and superstar directors (your Hillers, Wajdas, Babencos, Ciminos, etc.).
It's either that or devising an "In Memoriam" reel that would go on the requisite 10-15 minutes, playing the highlights reel during the Oscarcast, and availing an expanded, unexpurgated, more-inclusive reel on the Academy's website.
The problem with the Oscar In Memoriam tribute began years ago when they started slipping in Producers, talent agents, and all sorts of other Hollywood types - maybe important people to making films but people that never appeared in any film and who are unrecognizable to the public watching the show on TV. So, who is the In-Memoriam tribute for? The viewing audience? Or for Hollywood insiders? The Academy lost sight of that years ago and ever since then the tribute has been near awful. I used to enjoy watching the Oscars, sometimes with my mother who really enjoyed seeing the Hollywood actors and actresses and directors she grew up watching in the 1930’s-1970’s, who had passed on. It was a moving experience for her, to see those great Hollywood stars who had meant so much to her, now gone.

I have nothing against including Hollywood producers and talent agents into the Oscar In Memoriam tribute, except the Academy refuses to lengthen it so as to make the time to include these people AND still recognize important actors, actresses, directors, and others, who should be in the tribute but who get left out.

I watched the tribute, this year was far better than most. It only included two people who I feel would not have been included, had they died say, twenty-five years ago. Donald P. Harris, Executive and Andrea Jaffe, Publicist. What I also noticed is there is a 30 second intro before a single memorial photo or clip is seen, and then a 40 second outro, again, where we see the singer finishing the song and the fade out, but no memorial tributes. Couldn’t that be shortened to 20 seconds in and 20 seconds out and free up another 30 seconds to include more memorials? Since the memorials average only 2-3 seconds each, they could use that additional 30 seconds to add in maybe 8-10 more deserving performers and artists, and still not add any extra time to the segment? There would be time for these important actors and actresses and artists who were excluded this year: Gloria DeHaven, Alan Young, Robert Vaughn, Fritz Weaver, William Schallert, James Stacy, Burt Kwouk, Barbara Hale, Miguel Ferrer, David Huddleston and maybe a few more. 
c***@aol.com
2017-02-28 15:24:40 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Michele Morgan and Madeleine LeBeau being left out was criminal.
Loading...