Discussion:
Recreational Grief
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Guilty Bastard
2018-03-27 21:35:54 UTC
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Grief Lite, Recreational Grief, Mourning Sickness, Conspicuous Compassion,
Tragedy Tourism, Guilt Tripping.

Most of these terms were evolved by a British civil society think-tank
called, "Civitas". They describe the spin-doctoring that surrounds a
government's strategy to attenuate the emotional critical mass of the
citizenry and thereby render them placid and manageable.

Joe Public feels that he has done something from the comfort of his
living room and does not therefore have to engage in further decisive or
effective action.

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"Mourning Sickness" is a religion:

Britons are feeding their own egos by indulging in "Recreational Grief"
for murdered children and dead celebrities they have never met, claims a
report.

Think-tank Civitas said wearing charity ribbons, holding silences and
joining protest marches all indicated the country was in emotional crisis.

The author said "Mourning Sickness" was a substitute for religion.
Rather than "piling up damp teddies and rotting flowers" people should
go out and do some real good, he urged.

In his report, "Conspicuous Compassion", author Patrick West said people
were trying to feel better about themselves by taking part in
"manufactured emotion".

"Phoney"

Describing extravagant public displays of grief for strangers as
'Grief-Lite' Mr. West said these activities were, "undertaken as an
enjoyable event, much like going to a football match or the last night
of the proms".

"Mourning Sickness is a religion for the lonely crowd that no longer
subscribes to orthodox churches. Its flowers and teddies are its rites,
its collective minutes' silences its liturgy and mass."

"But these new bonds are phoney, ephemeral and cynical", he said. "We
saw this at its most ghoulish after the demise of Diana. In truth,
mourners were not crying for her, but for themselves", he wrote.

Years later, he claimed, "Diana had served her purpose. The public had
moved on.

These recreational grievers were now emoting about Jill Dando, Linda
McCartney or the Soham girls."

His 80-page pamphlet said that while the Soham murders were
"unquestionably tragic", it was "almost as distressing to see sections
of the public jumping on the grief bandwagon".

He said the traditional minute's silence has suffered "compassion
inflation" and become meaningless. "They are getting longer and we are
having more of them, because we want to be seen to care."

"When a group called Hedgeline calls for a two-minute silence to
remember all the 'victims' whose neighbours have grown towering hedges,
we truly have reached the stage where this gesture has been emptied of
meaning", he added.

Moving on to the wearing of charity ribbons, the report said the act
served to "celebrate the culture of victimhood" and was an egotistical
gesture to announce
"I care".

The trend had not been accompanied by a tangible increase in charity
donations, it added, and there was now an "unspoken competition" to see
who could wear their Remembrance Day poppy earliest, "particularly among
politicians".

And on going on demonstrations, the report said it was, "too often an
exercise in attention-seeking".

"Next time you profess that you 'care' about something, consider your
motives and the consequences of your words and actions. Sometimes, the
only person you really care about is yourself", said the report.

Civitas, also known as the Institute for the Study of Civil Society, was
launched in 2000 as an independent registered charity.

Story from BBC NEWS:
http://news.bbc.co.uk/go/pr/fr/-/1/hi/uk/3512447.stm

Published: Feb. 23, 2004

© BBC 2006
David Carson
2018-03-28 03:18:58 UTC
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Post by Guilty Bastard
Think-tank Civitas said wearing charity ribbons, holding silences and
joining protest marches all indicated the country was in emotional crisis.
I'd like to add flying the flag at half staff to that list.
Michael OConnor
2018-03-28 05:53:42 UTC
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Don't forget the hashtag campaign.
c***@aol.com
2018-03-28 13:30:17 UTC
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I don’t mind flying the flag at half staff. But it’s done too often. It cheapens it.

Look at the “standing ovation.” It used to be rare. At this year’s Oscars, there were 10 standing ovations. At the Grammys, they stand for every winner.
David Carson
2018-03-28 15:16:43 UTC
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I don’t mind flying the flag at half staff. But it’s done too often. It cheapens it.
That's what I meant. Billy Graham died? Fine. Remembering Pearl Harbor
Day? Good. But for the victims of a terrorist attack in France? For
National Fallen Firefighters Memorial Day? Give me a break. Lowering
the flag should be done as an expression of a nation mourning, not to
"raise awareness."
Larc
2018-03-28 16:11:25 UTC
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On Wed, 28 Mar 2018 06:30:17 -0700 (PDT), ***@aol.com wrote:

| I don’t mind flying the flag at half staff. But it’s done too often. It cheapens it.
|
| Look at the “standing ovation.” It used to be rare. At this year’s Oscars, there were 10 standing ovations. At the Grammys, they stand for every winner.

Things have changed and not for the better. People used to wait until a performance
was over to applaud and perhaps yell their appreciation. Now they not only do it
during, but sometimes loudly enough to drown out the performer.

Larc
l***@yahoo.com
2018-03-28 16:52:21 UTC
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People certainly used to have more dignity and decorum in public - especially in England, I assume.

A story about British wit Quentin Crisp (I hope I have all the details right):

In November of 1953, he was sitting in a cafe in London when a female friend burst in. Through her sobs and tears, she announced that the world-famous poet Dylan Thomas, aged 39, had just died.

Without even looking up, Mr. Crisp said:

"Oh? Was he a friend of yours?"


Lenona.
Guilty Bastard
2018-04-02 22:25:35 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
People certainly used to have more dignity and decorum in public - especially in England, I assume.
In November of 1953, he was sitting in a cafe in London when a female friend burst in. Through her sobs and tears, she announced that the world-famous poet Dylan Thomas, aged 39, had just died.
"Oh? Was he a friend of yours?"
Lenona.
The Princess Diana showdown was something to behold. Tons of flowers
left in the street and people lying on the ground crying rivers for
someone they didn't even know and never met.
c***@aol.com
2018-04-02 22:50:02 UTC
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Almost as bad as the John Lennon cult.
Terry del Fuego
2018-04-03 13:04:30 UTC
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On Mon, 2 Apr 2018 15:50:02 -0700 (PDT), Terry "Pig-Fucker" Ellsworth,
Post by c***@aol.com
Almost as bad as the John Lennon cult.
I stopped counting my orgasms after number 8 on the day Barbara
Stanwyck died.

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