Discussion:
Steven Bochco, "Hill Street Blues", 74
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David Carson
2018-04-02 01:00:57 UTC
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http://www.tmz.com/2018/04/01/steven-bochco-dead-dies/
Steven Bochco Dead at 74

Steven Bochco, one of the most prolific creators of TV ever, has died ...
TMZ has learned.

Sources connected to the family tell us, the "Hill Street Blues" creator
died this weekend. He had been battling leukemia for several years and put
up a hard fight, but one family source says he finally just gave up.

Bochco carved out a specific area for many of his shows -- the law. His
police shows were gritty and compelling.

Bochco has been responsible for groundbreaking TV, including, "L.A. Law,"
"Doogie Howser, M.D." and "NYPD Blue." His credits go on ... "Murder One,"
"Murder in the First," "Raising the Bar," and "Civil Wars." Bochco was a
gift to NBC, providing the network with juggernauts like "Hill Street
Blues."

Bochco has won 4 Peabody Awards and 10 Emmys.

He is survived by his wife, a son and a daughter.

Bochco was 74. RIP
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Michael OConnor
2018-04-02 01:17:19 UTC
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That is a huge loss; "Hill Street Blues" was a truly groundbreaking TV series and Bochco came back with the equally groundbreaking "NYPD Blue".

Four Peabody Awards? I googled to find out who won the most Peabody Awards but came up dry, but I imagine few people in television have won four of them.
u***@aol.com
2018-04-03 01:01:09 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
That is a huge loss; "Hill Street Blues" was a truly groundbreaking TV series and Bochco came back with the equally groundbreaking "NYPD Blue"
And "L.A. Law", giving him creator and producer status for three groundbreaking and influential series

(And the excruciating Cop Rock, Hooperman, Bay City Blues, and Capitol Critters_

Bochco's lasting contribution remains the insertion of week-to-week (or even season-long) story arcs into gritty ensemble dramas. Other than soap operas and Dallas and Dynasty, this was not the norm. He seemingly invented the wheel with Hill Street Blues and then went back to the same or a similar wheel numerous times. When he strayed from that formula, success did not come easy.
c***@aol.com
2018-04-03 01:19:30 UTC
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The arc thing was done on Family and other shows long before Hill Street Blues.

The other great thing was season one of Murder One before the network ruined it.
u***@aol.com
2018-04-03 03:43:49 UTC
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Post by c***@aol.com
The arc thing was done on Family and other shows long before Hill Street Blues.
Right, and Lucy's pregnancy arc stretched over several episodes of "I Love Lucy". If you believe that "Family" was a gritty ensemble drama rather than a family-friendly prime-time soap opera akin to "The Waltons", well, good on ya.
c***@aol.com
2018-04-03 04:01:11 UTC
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Because “gritty cop show” is a genre. Give me a break. Family was less soap opera than Hill Street Blues.
u***@aol.com
2018-04-03 05:00:52 UTC
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Post by c***@aol.com
Because “gritty cop show” is a genre. Give me a break.
So you introduce a three-word term so that you can dismiss it? Way to wrestle that straw man to the ground.
Post by c***@aol.com
Family was less soap opera than Hill Street Blues.
I heartily apologize if I shat upon some of your cherished memories.
c***@aol.com
2018-04-03 11:08:31 UTC
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Apologize to your underpants. You shat yourself.
Michael OConnor
2018-04-03 02:32:03 UTC
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Hill Street Blues, I always felt, was greatly inspired by the writings of Joseph Wambaugh, with the off-the wall characters, and showing the good and bad side of cops and that at the end of the day, good does not always win. One moment you are laughing and the next moment you feel like you have been punched in the gut. Sometimes a cop shoots an innocent person and has to deal with it, or a cop gets shot for no reason at all other than showing up in the wrong place at the wrong time.
Travoltron
2018-04-02 18:48:15 UTC
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From Twitter:

"Bochco. In 1987 he tried to betray the WGA by persuading the top
writers to leave the union so he could get richer while sticking the
rest of us with a shitty deal. Also cheated on his wife with my friend's
wife ruining both marriages. But made some good TV."
Diner
2018-04-02 20:09:51 UTC
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Post by Travoltron
"Bochco. In 1987 he tried to betray the WGA by persuading the top
writers to leave the union so he could get richer while sticking the
rest of us with a shitty deal. Also cheated on his wife with my friend's
wife ruining both marriages. But made some good TV."
In case you're wondering who wrote that:

https://twitter.com/JayKogen/status/980817410465841153
Louis Epstein
2018-04-03 21:26:06 UTC
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Post by David Carson
http://www.tmz.com/2018/04/01/steven-bochco-dead-dies/
Steven Bochco Dead at 74
Steven Bochco, one of the most prolific creators of TV ever, has died ...
TMZ has learned.
Sources connected to the family tell us, the "Hill Street Blues" creator
died this weekend. He had been battling leukemia for several years and put
up a hard fight, but one family source says he finally just gave up.
Bochco carved out a specific area for many of his shows -- the law. His
police shows were gritty and compelling.
Bochco has been responsible for groundbreaking TV, including, "L.A. Law,"
"Doogie Howser, M.D." and "NYPD Blue." His credits go on ... "Murder One,"
"Murder in the First," "Raising the Bar," and "Civil Wars." Bochco was a
gift to NBC, providing the network with juggernauts like "Hill Street
Blues."
Bochco has won 4 Peabody Awards and 10 Emmys.
He is survived by his wife, a son and a daughter.
Bochco was 74. RIP
Also wrote the "Invisible Man" premiere episode (guest starring
Robert Alda,Barry Sullivan,and James Karen) that I remember fondly
over 40 years later.

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
Michael OConnor
2018-04-03 21:43:34 UTC
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Post by Louis Epstein
Also wrote the "Invisible Man" premiere episode (guest starring
Robert Alda,Barry Sullivan,and James Karen) that I remember fondly
over 40 years later.
I watched that series about ten years ago on the Trio channel (which I'm guessing is on-topic these days) which had a "Brilliant But Cancelled" marathon and ran all the episodes of the series.

Bochco also co-wrote the environmental sci-fi movie "Silent Running".
Louis Epstein
2018-04-06 22:04:24 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
Post by Louis Epstein
Also wrote the "Invisible Man" premiere episode (guest starring
Robert Alda,Barry Sullivan,and James Karen) that I remember fondly
over 40 years later.
I watched that series about ten years ago on the Trio channel (which I'm guessing is on-topic these days) which had a "Brilliant But Cancelled" marathon and ran all the episodes of the series.
Bochco also co-wrote the environmental sci-fi movie "Silent Running".
Another thing I watched without knowing he worked on it!

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.

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