Discussion:
Allen Wayne Damron; Singer, storyteller and co-founder of Kerrville Folk Festival
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Hyfler/Rosner
2005-08-22 03:10:36 UTC
ALLEN WAYNE DAMRON Singer, storyteller and co-founder of
Kerrville Folk Festival

BYLINE: DAVID RENFROW, Staff Writer, Dallas Morning News


Allen Wayne Damron was a folk singer, a storyteller and a
longtime promoter of young talent. Mr. Damron died Aug. 13
at his home in Terlingua, Texas, after a long illness. He
was 66. A memorial folk service will be at 11 a.m. Sept. 4
on Chapel Hill at the Kerrville Wine and Music Festival at
Quiet Valley Ranch outside Kerrville, Texas. A Dallas
memorial for Mr. Damron will be at Poor David's Pub at 3
p.m. Aug. 28. Mr. Damron was born March 1, 1939, on his
family's farm outside Raymondville, Texas. He earned an
associate of arts degree in drama at Lon Morris College in
East Texas and a bachelor of arts in psychology from the
University of Texas at Austin. In partnership with promoter
Rod Kennedy, Mr. Damron was general manager of the Chequered
Flag club in Austin in the late 1960s. Many credit the club
with being seminal to the "Austin sound" that would develop
over the next decade. The club featured early performances
by Janis Joplin, Nanci Griffith and Jerry Jeff Walker. In
1971, Mr. Damron managed the Rubaiyat coffeehouse in Dallas,
which showcased Michael Martin Murphey, B.W. Stephenson and
Steve Fromholz, who was then in the duo Frummox. But one of
his greatest devotions was to the Kerrville Folk Festival,
which he and Mr. Kennedy co-founded in 1971. The first
festival was in 1972 and is one of the oldest annual folk
festivals in North America. Mr. Damron tirelessly promoted
the festival and played there himself until 2003. Mr.
Damron's former agent, Vickie Barcomb, said that although
Mr. Damron never became a headliner, he was always happy
when someone he knew did. "He never got a big break," said
Ms. Barcomb. "Any other performer it would have made bitter.
But he never became bitter. He was the first to stand up and
cheer when somebody made it." Mack Partain, stage manager at
the Kerrville Folk Festival for 21 years, said that Mr.
Damron extended that attitude to younger musicians trying to
get a start. "It's a big loss and a big loss to younger
musicians," Mr. Partain said. "There aren't many people who
will get out there and talk about them and play their songs
and get behind them like he would." David Card of Poor
David's Pub booked Mr. Damron for performances for more than
20 years. He said that although Mr. Damron may not have been
the most technical guitar player, his attitude made him the
consummate entertainer. "He was upbeat, sort of your classic
troubadour who would go on the road and entertain," Mr. Card
said. "He had a great sense of humor and a great attitude."
In the late 1970s, Mr. Damron began a parallel career as a
storyteller, performing at the Tejas Storytelling Festival
and the George West Storyfest and publishing Best Stories
from the Texas Storytelling Festivals. Survivors include his
wife, Marie, of Terlingua. E-mail ***@dallasnews.com
J. E. Durbin
2005-08-22 03:29:00 UTC
Post by Hyfler/Rosner
ALLEN WAYNE DAMRON Singer, storyteller and co-founder of
Kerrville Folk Festival
Mr. Damron died Aug. 13 at his home in Terlingua, Texas, after a long illness.
Pronounced "ter ling guh"

Other Texas placename pronunciation oddities:

Buchannen --> "buck ann in"

Manor --> "may nor"

Manchaca --> "man shack"

Burnett --> "burn it"

Gulf Mart --> "guff maht"

Palestine --> "palace teen"
Post by Hyfler/Rosner
Mr. Damron was general manager of the Chequered
Flag club in Austin in the late 1960s. Many credit the club
with being seminal to the "Austin sound" that would develop
over the next decade.
I wonder how I missed that place? I was a big folkie in high school
and early college at UT during that time. The seminal music places I
remember were Armadillo World Headquarters (the 13th Floor Elevators,
Joplin), the Eleventh Door, and The Vulcan Gas Company (the Conqueroo
and Shiva's Head Band).