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Steve the security robot, fell down the steps and drowned
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Michael OConnor
2017-07-19 16:46:35 UTC
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When I was reading this story I immediately thought of ED209 trying to navigate a flight of stairs in the original Robocop:



http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2017/07/19/security-robot-meets-untimely-demise-after-drowning-on-the-job/

Security Robot Meets Untimely Demise After Drowning On The Job
July 19, 2017 6:59 AM

By Nancy Coleman

WASHINGTON (CNN) — It was one small step for security technology, but one giant leap in the wrong direction for robotkind.

A security robot in Washington, D.C. — lovingly named Steve — plunged down four steps into a fountain Monday.

Photos show the sad, waterlogged robot cop partially submerged in defeat. It’s unclear if any foul play was involved or if Steve simply rolled down a dark path on his own.

Steve had just started patrolling the Washington Harbour, a riverside complex in Georgetown with restaurants and offices, last week. The Washington Harbour and its real estate developer, MRP Realty, introduced the robot on Facebook on July 12.

The post touts Steve’s “extensive catalogue of security capabilities,” which apparently does not include any underwater crime-fighting.

Steve was still getting used to the streets he was programmed to protect. He was “mapping out the grounds” to theoretically prevent this kind of accident.

“This initial phase is our opportunity to implement, vet, and remediate any bugs in the system to help advance both the programming and security features in a busy mixed-use center such as The Washington Harbour,” an MRP spokesperson wrote in a statement to CNN. “These incidents show us where improvements are needed, which may then be deployed to contribute to the ongoing security of our tenants, residents, and visitors.”

Even though Steve had only been rolling around for a few days, he already made some new friends. “He looked so happy and healthy,” one mourner remembered on Twitter.

But others who work near Steve weren’t too sad to see him go. One not-so-fondly reflected on Steve being “very creepy.”

And for some, Steve’s unfortunate swim was a victory for humans fighting against the robot uprising.

A company called Knightscope produces Autonomous Data Machines like Steve. According to the company’s website, the ADMs use multiple sensors to detect their location and “carefully navigate” the right path. And while Steve was “ruggedized and protected against vandalism,” it’s unclear if those same protections would save the robot from any water damage.

And this isn’t the first time a security robot has run into trouble. In April, a drunken man in California tipped over a 300-pound Knightscope ADM. Last summer, another one in California knocked over a toddler.

Knightscope has not responded to requests for comment, and there’s no word yet if Steve survived his unprecedented dip in the fountain. Luckily, no one was injured — except for Steve.
RH Draney
2017-07-19 21:25:08 UTC
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Post by Michael OConnor
A security robot in Washington, D.C. — lovingly named Steve — plunged down four steps into a fountain Monday.
Dalek Invasion: 2017....r
Steve Hayes
2017-07-20 07:11:42 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Jul 2017 09:46:35 -0700 (PDT), Michael OConnor
Post by Michael OConnor
http://youtu.be/mRDl5_-wJ0Y
http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2017/07/19/security-robot-meets-untimely-demise-after-drowning-on-the-job/
Security Robot Meets Untimely Demise After Drowning On The Job
July 19, 2017 6:59 AM
By Nancy Coleman
<snip>
Post by Michael OConnor
“This initial phase is our opportunity to implement, vet, and remediate any bugs in the system..."
OK, what's the difference between "remediate" and "remedy"?

Or is it hyphenocide, and should read "re-mediate"?
--
Steve Hayes
http://www.khanya.org.za/stevesig.htm
http://khanya.wordpress.com
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-07-20 10:17:39 UTC
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Post by Steve Hayes
On Wed, 19 Jul 2017 09:46:35 -0700 (PDT), Michael OConnor
Post by Michael OConnor
http://youtu.be/mRDl5_-wJ0Y
http://philadelphia.cbslocal.com/2017/07/19/security-robot-meets-untimely-demise-after-drowning-on-the-job/
Security Robot Meets Untimely Demise After Drowning On The Job
July 19, 2017 6:59 AM
By Nancy Coleman
<snip>
Post by Michael OConnor
“This initial phase is our opportunity to implement, vet, and remediate any bugs in the system..."
OK, what's the difference between "remediate" and "remedy"?
Or is it hyphenocide, and should read "re-mediate"?
It's not the later. That is sense 1 listed in the OED.

This is the relevant one:

remediate, v.2

Etymology: Probably back-formation < remediation n. (compare -ate
suffix3).

trans. To provide a remedy for, redress, counteract; to take
remedial action against.

1837 C. V. Kraitsir Poles in U.S.A. 27 Majorianus..endeavoured
to remediate the deficit of the public income, the defence of the
cities and the morals.
1854 Times 8 Nov. 5/2 The more I feel are we bound to contribute
and endeavour to remediate the horrors and distressing
deprivations entailed by it upon the bereaved widows and orphans
through the recent most sad and heart-rending massacres.
1897 Yale Literary Mag. Jan. 201 All that he might do could not
remediate his intemperance.
1966 Amer. Educ. Res. Jrnl. 3 313 A preschool cannot be expected
to remediate all deficiencies among disadvantaged children.
1973 Black World Mar. 31 Without supportive services
to..remediate their academic deficiencies,..the students
experienced an extremely high failure rate the first year.
2007 C. J. Gelso & J. A. Hayes Countertransference & Therapist's
Inner Experience v. 101 (heading) Remediating the negative
effects of countertransference.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
Daniel James
2017-07-20 14:02:49 UTC
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Post by Steve Hayes
OK, what's the difference between "remediate" and "remedy"?
There is no difference in meaning.

The use of "remediate" is either pretentious -- using a longer
formation that is necessary -- or an indication that the author didn't
think about what they were writing long enough to choose the best word.
--
Cheers,
Daniel.
John Dunlop
2017-07-20 14:46:45 UTC
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Post by Daniel James
The use of "remediate" is either pretentious -- using a longer
formation that is necessary [...]
I like "formation" here. "Form" would break the first rule of good
prose: Don't use a short word where a sesquipedalian one will do.
--
John
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-07-20 16:00:56 UTC
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Post by John Dunlop
Post by Daniel James
The use of "remediate" is either pretentious -- using a longer
formation that is necessary [...]
I like "formation" here. "Form" would break the first rule of good
prose: Don't use a short word where a sesquipedalian one will do.
<chuckle>
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
RH Draney
2017-07-20 20:34:13 UTC
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Post by John Dunlop
Post by Daniel James
The use of "remediate" is either pretentious -- using a longer
formation that is necessary [...]
I like "formation" here. "Form" would break the first rule of good
prose: Don't use a short word where a sesquipedalian one will do.
You're probably also one of those who speaks of "preventative measures",
figuring that an ounce of preventation is worth a pound of curate....r
occam
2017-08-03 15:27:52 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by John Dunlop
Post by Daniel James
The use of "remediate" is either pretentious -- using a longer
formation that is necessary [...]
I like "formation" here. "Form" would break the first rule of good
prose: Don't use a short word where a sesquipedalian one will do.
You're probably also one of those who speaks of "preventative measures",
figuring that an ounce of preventation is worth a pound of curate....r
Or, in new units, that would be "a grain of preventation is worth a heap
of curification"

Daniel James
2017-07-25 12:08:05 UTC
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[I wrote]
Post by Daniel James
The use of "remediate" is either pretentious -- using a longer
formation that is necessary [...]
I like "formation" here. "Form" would break the first rule of good
prose: Don't use a short word where a sesquipedalian one will do.
They said irony was dead, but I didn't listenificate.
--
Cheers,
Daniel.
Lewis
2017-07-21 06:18:25 UTC
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Post by Daniel James
Post by Steve Hayes
OK, what's the difference between "remediate" and "remedy"?
There is no difference in meaning.
The use of "remediate" is either pretentious -- using a longer
formation that is necessary -- or an indication that the author didn't
think about what they were writing long enough to choose the best word.
This is not correct.

Remediate means to apply a remedy, to stop or reverse environmental
damage, to reverse damage cause by infection or disease, and also to
teach remedial subject matter.

The words are closely related, but there are certainly difference.
--
One tequila, two tequila, three tequila, floor.
Robert Bannister
2017-07-22 00:23:39 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Daniel James
Post by Steve Hayes
OK, what's the difference between "remediate" and "remedy"?
There is no difference in meaning.
The use of "remediate" is either pretentious -- using a longer
formation that is necessary -- or an indication that the author didn't
think about what they were writing long enough to choose the best word.
This is not correct.
Remediate means to apply a remedy, to stop or reverse environmental
damage, to reverse damage cause by infection or disease, and also to
teach remedial subject matter.
The words are closely related, but there are certainly difference.
So what does the verb "remedy" mean?
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Lewis
2017-07-22 20:07:59 UTC
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Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Lewis
Post by Daniel James
Post by Steve Hayes
OK, what's the difference between "remediate" and "remedy"?
There is no difference in meaning.
The use of "remediate" is either pretentious -- using a longer
formation that is necessary -- or an indication that the author didn't
think about what they were writing long enough to choose the best word.
This is not correct.
Remediate means to apply a remedy, to stop or reverse environmental
damage, to reverse damage cause by infection or disease, and also to
teach remedial subject matter.
The words are closely related, but there are certainly difference.
So what does the verb "remedy" mean?
To put right.
--
Whoever had created humanity had left in a major design flaw. It was its
tendency to bend at the knees. --Feet of Clay
Steve Hayes
2017-07-24 03:07:24 UTC
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On Fri, 21 Jul 2017 06:18:25 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Daniel James
Post by Steve Hayes
OK, what's the difference between "remediate" and "remedy"?
There is no difference in meaning.
The use of "remediate" is either pretentious -- using a longer
formation that is necessary -- or an indication that the author didn't
think about what they were writing long enough to choose the best word.
This is not correct.
Remediate means to apply a remedy, to stop or reverse environmental
damage, to reverse damage cause by infection or disease, and also to
teach remedial subject matter.
Doesn't "remedy" mean those things?
Post by Lewis
The words are closely related, but there are certainly difference.
You gave the meaning of one of the words, but not of the other, which
might have shown the difference.
--
Steve Hayes
http://www.khanya.org.za/stevesig.htm
http://khanya.wordpress.com
Louis Epstein
2017-07-22 18:09:57 UTC
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Post by Daniel James
Post by Steve Hayes
OK, what's the difference between "remediate" and "remedy"?
There is no difference in meaning.
The use of "remediate" is either pretentious -- using a longer
formation that is necessary -- or an indication that the author didn't
think about what they were writing long enough to choose the best word.
I think you meant "than" is necessary,
as saying the longer formation IS necessary,
which "that" would indicate,goes against the
rest of your sentence.

So how does "signalize" differ from "signal"?
I can see some senses where it could,but I've definitely
seen the former used when the latter would do.

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
Daniel James
2017-07-25 12:08:05 UTC
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Post by Louis Epstein
Post by Daniel James
The use of "remediate" is either pretentious -- using a longer
formation that is necessary -- or an indication that the author
didn't think about what they were writing long enough to choose
the best word.
I think you meant "than" is necessary,
I did. Sorry.
Post by Louis Epstein
So how does "signalize" differ from "signal"?
I can see some senses where it could,but I've definitely
seen the former used when the latter would do.
When the suffix "-ize" is added to a noun or adjective it has the effect
of forming a verb that denotes the action of turning something into what
that noun or adjective describes.

So, for example, in computing "initialize" is used to mean setting
something to a defined inital state.

"Signalize", if it means anything at all, would describe the act of
turning something that is not a signal into a signal. If you see it used
in any other way that's probably an error.
--
Cheers,
Daniel.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-07-25 12:52:16 UTC
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Post by Daniel James
Post by Louis Epstein
Post by Daniel James
The use of "remediate" is either pretentious -- using a longer
formation that is necessary -- or an indication that the author
didn't think about what they were writing long enough to choose
the best word.
I think you meant "than" is necessary,
I did. Sorry.
Post by Louis Epstein
So how does "signalize" differ from "signal"?
I can see some senses where it could,but I've definitely
seen the former used when the latter would do.
When the suffix "-ize" is added to a noun or adjective it has the effect
of forming a verb that denotes the action of turning something into what
that noun or adjective describes.
So, for example, in computing "initialize" is used to mean setting
something to a defined inital state.
"Signalize", if it means anything at all, would describe the act of
turning something that is not a signal into a signal. If you see it used
in any other way that's probably an error.
"Hospitalize a person" means convert the person into a hospital?
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.english.usage)
Daniel James
2017-07-26 18:37:41 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
"Hospitalize a person" means convert the person into a hospital?
Well, obviously, yes it must ... but most people seem to use it as an
alternative to "patientize" (and I can see why)!

No, seriously, I think the formation here comes -- at least notionally
-- via the verbing of the noun "hospital", from which we get the
adjective "hospitalled" (meaning admitted to a hospital), and
"hospitalize" comes from adding the "-ize" suffix to "hospital" in that
sense.

It does break (or perhaps circumvent) the apparent 'rule' for the
application of "-ize" ... but language has rules only so that they can
be broken!
--
Cheers,
Daniel.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-07-25 20:16:46 UTC
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Post by Daniel James
"Signalize", if it means anything at all, would describe the act of
turning something that is not a signal into a signal. If you see it used
in any other way that's probably an error.
OED:

signalize, v.

Etymology: < signal adj. + -ize suffix. In sense 1c perhaps after
French signaler signal v. (1587 in Middle French in this sense, used
reflexively). With sense 6 compare French signaliser , in same sense
(1909). Compare later signal v.

1. trans.
a. To make noteworthy or remarkable, to distinguish, esp. by a
striking action or event. Now rare.
1613—1922

b. To make known or display (a quality, attribute, or feeling) in a
striking manner, esp. by a noteworthy action. Now rare.
1624—1948

c. refl. To distinguish oneself, esp. by a notable action or
quality. Formerly also with †from. Now rare.
1638—1920

2. trans. To characterize or mark conspicuously; to be a
distinguishing feature of. Now rare.
1698—1960

3. trans. To point out, note or mention specially, draw attention
to. Now rare.
1698—1956

4.
a. trans. Chiefly Naut. To make signals to; to communicate with by
means of a signal or signals. Now rare.
1805—1904

b. trans. Chiefly Naut. To announce or communicate (a fact, message,
etc.) by a signal or signals. Now rare.
1825—1937

c. intr. To make or send signals; to communicate by means of a
signal or signals. Now rare.
1838—1906

5. trans. To indicate; to be a sign or signal of (esp. something new
or previously unknown).
1808—2008

6. trans. Chiefly N. Amer. To provide (an intersection, etc.) with
traffic signals.
1926—2010

<smile>
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Steve Hayes
2017-07-24 03:04:14 UTC
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Post by Daniel James
Post by Steve Hayes
OK, what's the difference between "remediate" and "remedy"?
There is no difference in meaning.
The use of "remediate" is either pretentious -- using a longer
formation that is necessary -- or an indication that the author didn't
think about what they were writing long enough to choose the best word.
I think you're probably right.

So it can be put in the same category as using "preventative" rather
than "preventive", and "orientated" rather than "oriented"?
--
Steve Hayes
http://www.khanya.org.za/stevesig.htm
http://khanya.wordpress.com
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