Discussion:
John W. Young, 87, Gemini, Apollo, Space Shuttle, moonwalking astronaut
(too old to reply)
That Derek
2018-01-06 17:40:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-010618a-astronaut-john-young-obituary.html

John Young, ninth astronaut on moon, led first shuttle mission, dies

January 6, 2018 — John Young, NASA's longest-serving astronaut, who walked on the moon and flew on the first Gemini and space shuttle missions, has died.

The first person to fly six times into space — seven, if you count his launch off of the moon in 1972 — and the only astronaut to command four different types of spacecraft, Young died on Friday (Jan. 5). He was 87.

"We're saddened by the loss of astronaut John Young," NASA stated on Saturday.

Selected alongside Neil Armstrong and Jim Lovell with NASA's second group of astronauts in 1962, Young flew two Gemini missions, two Apollo missions and two space shuttle missions. He was one of only three astronauts to launch to the moon twice and was the ninth person to step foot on the lunar surface.

In total, Young logged 34 days, 19 hours and 39 minutes flying in space, including 20 hours and 14 minutes walking on the moon.

"I've been very lucky, I think," said Young in a NASA interview in 2004, when he retired from the space agency after 42 years.

Young made the first of his six missions as the pilot on the maiden flight of Gemini, NASA's two-seater spacecraft. Flying with original Mercury astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom, Young launched on the nearly five-hour Gemini 3 mission on March 23, 1965, putting the new vehicle through its paces while also taking a bite or two from a later infamous corned beef sandwich that he smuggled aboard the flight.

Gemini 3 "was a truly excellent engineering test flight of the vehicle," Young wrote in his 2012 memoirs, "Forever Young."

Young commanded his second spaceflight, Gemini 10, in July 1966. The three-day mission climbed to more than 400 miles (760 kilometers) above Earth to measure the risk posed by radiation, conducted the program's first double rendezvous with two Agena target vehicles and included two spacewalks by pilot Michael Collins.

On the Apollo 10 mission in May 1969, Young became the first person to orbit the moon alone. A full-up dress rehearsal for the first lunar landing two months later, Young stayed aboard the command module "Charlie Brown" while his crewmates, Thomas Stafford and Eugene Cernan, flew "Snoopy," the Apollo 10 lunar module, to within 47,000 feet (14 km) of the moon's surface.

On their return to Earth, Young, Stafford and Cernan set a record for the highest speed achieved by astronauts aboard a spacecraft: 24,791 mph (39,897 km/h) on May 26, 1969.

Young got his chance to walk on the moon in April 1972, as commander of Apollo 16, the fifth and penultimate Apollo lunar landing. Young and Charles Duke landed the "Orion" lunar module in the Descartes highlands for a nearly three-day stay.

"There you are, mysterious and unknown Descartes – Highland plains," described Young, as he took his first steps on the moon

Exhibiting his dry wit, Young then compared his situation to a Joel Chandler Harris story, adapted for the Disney movie "Song of the South," to express how fortunate he felt to be on the moon.

"I'm sure glad they got ol' Br'er Rabbit here," he remarked, "back in the briar patch where he belongs."

Over the course of three excursions across the boulder-strewn surface, Young and Duke explored more than 16 miles (26 km), becoming the second crew to drive a lunar rover. As they went, they collected 211 pounds (96 kilograms) of moon rocks and lunar soil, which they brought back to Earth with Apollo 16 command module pilot Thomas "Ken" Mattingly.

During their first moonwalk, Young and Duke received word from Mission Control that the U.S. Congress had approved the funding to develop the space shuttle.

"The country needs that shuttle mighty bad," Young said in response. "You'll see."

Although he had no way of knowing it at the time, Young would next make history commanding the first flight of the space shuttle nine years later, almost to the day.

Young and Robert Crippen launched on space shuttle Columbia on April 12, 1981. Because of the way the orbiter had been designed, it could not be tested in space without a crew.

"I think if you look at all the things we had to do, flying a winged launch vehicle into space without any previous unmanned test, it probably was very bold," Young told collectSPACE in 2006, on the 25th anniversary of the STS-1 mission.

For two days and six hours, Young and Crippen tested Columbia's systems before returning to Earth like no other orbital spacecraft had done before — with wings, gliding to a touchdown on the dry lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California.

"This is the world's greatest flying machine, I'll tell you that," stated Young, as the orbiter came to a wheels stop under his control.

Young's then-record sixth space mission returned him to the commander's seat on board Columbia for the orbiter's sixth mission in November 1983. This time, Young led a crew of five, including the first international astronaut to fly on the shuttle, Ulf Merbold of the European Space Agency (ESA).

STS-9 also marked the the first flight of the European-built Spacelab laboratory, a pressurized module that was mounted inside the orbiter's payload bay. The 10-day mission carried out 72 experiments in astronomy, astrobiology, material sciences and Earth observation.

On Dec. 8, 1983, Columbia made a pre-dawn landing at Edwards, returning Young to Earth for the last time.

John Watts Young was born on Sept. 24, 1930, in San Francisco, California. When he was 18 months old, Young's parents moved, first to Georgia and then Orlando, Florida, where he attended elementary and high school.

Young earned his bachelor of science degree in aeronautical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1952.

After graduation, he entered the U.S. Navy, serving on the destroyer USS Laws in the Korean War and then entering flight training before being assigned to a fighter squadron for four years.

Young graduated from the U.S. Navy Test Pilot School in 1959 and served at the Naval Air Test Center at Naval Air Station Patuxent River in Maryland, where he evaluated Crusader and Phantom fighter weapons systems. In 1962, he set world time-to-climb records to 3,000 and 25,000-meter (82,021 and 9,843-feet) altitudes in the F-4 Phantom.

Young retired from the U.S. Navy with the rank of captain in 1976. Over the course of his flying career, he logged more than 15,275 hours in props, jets, helicopters and rocket jets, including more than 9,200 hours in NASA's T-38 astronaut training jets.

In addition to his own six spaceflights, Young also served on five backup crews, including backup pilot for Gemini 6; backup command module pilot for the second Apollo mission (as slated before the Apollo 1 fire) and Apollo 7, the first crewed Apollo launch; and backup commander for Apollo 13 and Apollo 17.

In 1974, Young was named the fifth chief of the Astronaut Office, after serving for a year as the office's space shuttle branch chief. For 13 years, Young led NASA's astronaut corps, overseeing the crews assigned to the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, the approach and landing tests with the prototype orbiter Enterprise, and the first 25 space shuttle missions.

After the loss of space shuttle Challenger and its seven-person crew in January 1986, Young penned internal memos critical of NASA's attention to safety, a topic he had championed since his days flying Gemini. Young expressed concern over schedule pressure and wrote that other astronauts who had launched on missions preceding the ill-fated STS-51L mission were "very lucky" to be alive.

Young was subsequently reassigned to be special assistant to the director of the Johnson Space Center for engineering, operations and safety until 1996, when he was named the associate director for technical affairs, a position he held until his retirement from NASA on Dec. 31, 2004.

Young was the recipient of many honors for his contributions to space exploration, including the Congressional Space Medal of Honor, NASA Distinguished Service Medal, Rotary National Space Achievement Award, and six honorary doctorates. Young was inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame in 1988 and Astronaut Hall of Fame in 1993.

He was awarded the NASA Ambassador of Exploration in 2005, including a moon rock he assigned for display at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, and was bestowed the General James E. Hill Lifetime Space Achievement Award from the Space Foundation in 2010. A stretch of Florida State Road 423 that runs through Orlando is named John Young Parkway in his honor.

Young is survived by his wife Susy, two children, Sandra and John, who he had with his first wife, Barbara White, and three grandchildren.
Louis Epstein
2018-01-06 18:12:43 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by That Derek
http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-010618a-astronaut-john-young-obituary.html
John Young, ninth astronaut on moon, led first shuttle mission, dies
January 6, 2018 ? John Young, NASA's longest-serving astronaut, who walked on the moon and flew on the first Gemini and space shuttle missions, has died.
The first person to fly six times into space ? seven, if you count his launch off of the moon in 1972 ? and the only astronaut to command four different types of spacecraft, Young died on Friday (Jan. 5). He was 87.
"We're saddened by the loss of astronaut John Young," NASA stated on Saturday.
Selected alongside Neil Armstrong and Jim Lovell with NASA's second group of astronauts in 1962, Young flew two Gemini missions, two Apollo missions and two space shuttle missions. He was one of only three astronauts to launch to the moon twice and was the ninth person to step foot on the lunar surface.
In total, Young logged 34 days, 19 hours and 39 minutes flying in space, including 20 hours and 14 minutes walking on the moon.
"I've been very lucky, I think," said Young in a NASA interview in 2004, when he retired from the space agency after 42 years.
Young made the first of his six missions as the pilot on the maiden flight of Gemini, NASA's two-seater spacecraft. Flying with original Mercury astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom, Young launched on the nearly five-hour Gemini 3 mission on March 23, 1965, putting the new vehicle through its paces while also taking a bite or two from a later infamous corned beef sandwich that he smuggled aboard the flight.
Gemini 3 "was a truly excellent engineering test flight of the vehicle," Young wrote in his 2012 memoirs, "Forever Young."
Young commanded his second spaceflight, Gemini 10, in July 1966. The three-day mission climbed to more than 400 miles (760 kilometers) above Earth to measure the risk posed by radiation, conducted the program's first double rendezvous with two Agena target vehicles and included two spacewalks by pilot Michael Collins.
On the Apollo 10 mission in May 1969, Young became the first person to orbit the moon alone. A full-up dress rehearsal for the first lunar landing two months later, Young stayed aboard the command module "Charlie Brown" while his crewmates, Thomas Stafford and Eugene Cernan, flew "Snoopy," the Apollo 10 lunar module, to within 47,000 feet (14 km) of the moon's surface.
On their return to Earth, Young, Stafford and Cernan set a record for the highest speed achieved by astronauts aboard a spacecraft: 24,791 mph (39,897 km/h) on May 26, 1969.
Young got his chance to walk on the moon in April 1972, as commander of Apollo 16, the fifth and penultimate Apollo lunar landing. Young and Charles Duke landed the "Orion" lunar module in the Descartes highlands for a nearly three-day stay.
"There you are, mysterious and unknown Descartes ? Highland plains," described Young, as he took his first steps on the moon
Exhibiting his dry wit, Young then compared his situation to a Joel Chandler Harris story, adapted for the Disney movie "Song of the South," to express how fortunate he felt to be on the moon.
"I'm sure glad they got ol' Br'er Rabbit here," he remarked, "back in the briar patch where he belongs."
Over the course of three excursions across the boulder-strewn surface, Young and Duke explored more than 16 miles (26 km), becoming the second crew to drive a lunar rover. As they went, they collected 211 pounds (96 kilograms) of moon rocks and lunar soil, which they brought back to Earth with Apollo 16 command module pilot Thomas "Ken" Mattingly.
During their first moonwalk, Young and Duke received word from Mission Control that the U.S. Congress had approved the funding to develop the space shuttle.
"The country needs that shuttle mighty bad," Young said in response. "You'll see."
Although he had no way of knowing it at the time, Young would next make history commanding the first flight of the space shuttle nine years later, almost to the day.
Young and Robert Crippen launched on space shuttle Columbia on April 12, 1981. Because of the way the orbiter had been designed, it could not be tested in space without a crew.
"I think if you look at all the things we had to do, flying a winged launch vehicle into space without any previous unmanned test, it probably was very bold," Young told collectSPACE in 2006, on the 25th anniversary of the STS-1 mission.
For two days and six hours, Young and Crippen tested Columbia's systems before returning to Earth like no other orbital spacecraft had done before ? with wings, gliding to a touchdown on the dry lake bed at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California.
"This is the world's greatest flying machine, I'll tell you that," stated Young, as the orbiter came to a wheels stop under his control.
Young's then-record sixth space mission returned him to the commander's seat on board Columbia for the orbiter's sixth mission in November 1983. This time, Young led a crew of five, including the first international astronaut to fly on the shuttle, Ulf Merbold of the European Space Agency (ESA).
STS-9 also marked the the first flight of the European-built Spacelab laboratory, a pressurized module that was mounted inside the orbiter's payload bay. The 10-day mission carried out 72 experiments in astronomy, astrobiology, material sciences and Earth observation.
On Dec. 8, 1983, Columbia made a pre-dawn landing at Edwards, returning Young to Earth for the last time.
John Watts Young was born on Sept. 24, 1930, in San Francisco, California. When he was 18 months old, Young's parents moved, first to Georgia and then Orlando, Florida, where he attended elementary and high school.
Young earned his bachelor of science degree in aeronautical engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1952.
After graduation, he entered the U.S. Navy, serving on the destroyer USS Laws in the Korean War and then entering flight training before being assigned to a fighter squadron for four years.
Young graduated from the U.S. Navy Test Pilot School in 1959 and served at the Naval Air Test Center at Naval Air Station Patuxent River in Maryland, where he evaluated Crusader and Phantom fighter weapons systems. In 1962, he set world time-to-climb records to 3,000 and 25,000-meter (82,021 and 9,843-feet) altitudes in the F-4 Phantom.
Young retired from the U.S. Navy with the rank of captain in 1976. Over the course of his flying career, he logged more than 15,275 hours in props, jets, helicopters and rocket jets, including more than 9,200 hours in NASA's T-38 astronaut training jets.
In addition to his own six spaceflights, Young also served on five backup crews, including backup pilot for Gemini 6; backup command module pilot for the second Apollo mission (as slated before the Apollo 1 fire) and Apollo 7, the first crewed Apollo launch; and backup commander for Apollo 13 and Apollo 17.
In 1974, Young was named the fifth chief of the Astronaut Office, after serving for a year as the office's space shuttle branch chief. For 13 years, Young led NASA's astronaut corps, overseeing the crews assigned to the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, the approach and landing tests with the prototype orbiter Enterprise, and the first 25 space shuttle missions.
After the loss of space shuttle Challenger and its seven-person crew in January 1986, Young penned internal memos critical of NASA's attention to safety, a topic he had championed since his days flying Gemini. Young expressed concern over schedule pressure and wrote that other astronauts who had launched on missions preceding the ill-fated STS-51L mission were "very lucky" to be alive.
Young was subsequently reassigned to be special assistant to the director of the Johnson Space Center for engineering, operations and safety until 1996, when he was named the associate director for technical affairs, a position he held until his retirement from NASA on Dec. 31, 2004.
Young was the recipient of many honors for his contributions to space exploration, including the Congressional Space Medal of Honor, NASA Distinguished Service Medal, Rotary National Space Achievement Award, and six honorary doctorates. Young was inducted into the National Aviation Hall of Fame in 1988 and Astronaut Hall of Fame in 1993.
He was awarded the NASA Ambassador of Exploration in 2005, including a moon rock he assigned for display at the Houston Museum of Natural Science, and was bestowed the General James E. Hill Lifetime Space Achievement Award from the Space Foundation in 2010. A stretch of Florida State Road 423 that runs through Orlando is named John Young Parkway in his honor.
Young is survived by his wife Susy, two children, Sandra and John, who he had with his first wife, Barbara White, and three grandchildren.
I'm glad he got a long and thorough obit.
I once saw him speak at the World Science Fiction Convention
(Orlando 1992 as I recall)...he wound up having to fly (as
in pilot) a military plane there from Houston after his
scheduled flight got cancelled.

Apollo commander,shuttle commander...one of the great pioneers.

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
That Derek
2018-01-06 20:56:29 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-john-young-dead-20180106-story.html

Legendary astronaut and moonwalker John Young has died, NASA says

Marcia Dunn
Associated Press

January 6, 2018, 1:27 PM

Legendary astronaut John Young, who walked on the moon and later commanded the first space shuttle flight, has died, NASA said Saturday. Young was 87.

The space agency said Young died Friday night at home in Houston following complications from pneumonia.

NASA called Young one of its pioneers - the only agency astronaut to go into space as part of the Gemini, Apollo and space shuttle programs, and the first to fly into space six times. He was the ninth man to walk on the moon.

"Astronaut John Young's storied career spanned three generations of spaceflight," NASA administrator Robert Lightfoot said in an emailed statement. "John was one of that group of early space pioneers whose bravery and commitment sparked our nation's first great achievements in space."

Young was the only spaceman to span NASA's Gemini, Apollo and shuttle programs, and became the first person to rocket away from Earth six times. Counting his takeoff from the moon in 1972 as commander of Apollo 16, his blastoff tally stood at seven, for decades a world record.

He flew twice during the two-man Gemini missions of the mid-1960s, twice to the moon during NASA's Apollo program, and twice more aboard the new space shuttle Columbia in the early 1980s.

His NASA career lasted 42 years, longer than any other astronaut's, and he was revered among his peers for his dogged dedication to keeping crews safe — and his outspokenness in challenging the space agency's status quo.

[PHOTO] John Young salutes the U.S. flag at the Descartes landing site on the moon during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity in April 1972. (Charles M. Duke Jr. / NASA via AP)

Chastened by the 1967 Apollo launch pad fire that killed three astronauts, Young spoke up after the 1986 shuttle Challenger launch accident. His hard scrutiny continued well past shuttle Columbia's disintegration during re-entry in 2003.

"Whenever and wherever I found a potential safety issue, I always did my utmost to make some noise about it, by memo or whatever means might best bring attention to it," Young wrote in his 2012 memoir, "Forever Young."

He said he wrote a "mountain of memos" between the two shuttle accidents to "hit people over the head." Such practice bordered on heresy at NASA.

Apollo 11 astronaut Michael Collins, who orbited the moon in 1969 as Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin walked its surface, considered Young "the memo-writing champion of the astronaut office." Young kept working at Johnson Space Center in Houston "long after his compatriots had been put out to pasture or discovered other green fields," Collins wrote in the foreword of "Forever Young.

[PHOTO] Astronauts Robert Crippen (left) and John Young (right) are seen in the flight deck of the space shuttle Columbia before the first shuttle flight at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on April 12, 1981.(NASA / AFP/Getty Images)

Indeed, Young remained an active astronaut into his early 70s, long after all his peers had left, and held on to his role as NASA's conscience until his retirement in 2004.

"You don't want to be politically correct," he said in a 2000 interview with The Associated Press. "You want to be right."

Young was in NASA's second astronaut class, chosen in 1962, along with the likes of Neil Armstrong, Pete Conrad and James Lovell.

Young was the first of his group to fly in space: He and Mercury astronaut Gus Grissom made the first manned Gemini mission in 1965. Unknown to NASA, Young smuggled a corned beef sandwich on board, given to him by Mercury astronaut Wally Schirra. When it came time to test NASA's official space food, Young handed Grissom the sandwich as a joke.

The ensuing scandal over that corned beef on rye — two silly minutes of an otherwise triumphant five-hour flight — always amazed Young. Sandwiches already had flown in space, Young said in his book, but NASA brass and Congress considered this one a multimillion-dollar embarrassment and outlawed corned beef sandwiches in space forever after.

Two years later, with Gemini over and Apollo looming, Young asked Grissom why he didn't say something about the bad wiring in the new Apollo 1 spacecraft. Grissom feared doing so would get him fired, Young said. A few weeks later, on Jan. 27, 1967, those wires contributed to the fire that killed Grissom, Edward White II and Roger Chaffee in a countdown practice on their Cape Canaveral launch pad.

It was the safety measures put in place after the fire that got 12 men, Young included, safely to the surface of the moon and back.

"I can assure you if we had not had that fire and rebuilt the command module ... we could not have done the Apollo program successfully," Young said in 2007. "So we owe a lot to Gus, and Rog and Ed. They made it possible for the rest of us to do the almost impossible."

Young orbited the moon on Apollo 10 in May 1969 in preparation for the Apollo 11 moon landing that was to follow in a couple months. He commanded Apollo 16 three years later, the next-to-last manned lunar voyage, and walked on the moon.

He hung on for the space shuttle, commanding Columbia's successful maiden voyage in 1981 with co-pilot Robert Crippen by his side. It was a risky endeavor: Never before had NASA launched people on a rocket ship that had not first been tested in space. Young pumped his fists in jubilation after emerging from Columbia on the California runway, following the two-day flight.

Young made his final trek into orbit aboard Columbia two years later, again as its skipper.

Young's reputation continued to grow, even after he stopped launching. He spoke out on safety measures, even before the Challenger debacle.

"By whatever management methods it takes, we must make Flight Safety first. If we do not consider Flight Safety first all the time at all levels of NASA, this machinery and this program will NOT make it," he warned colleagues.

As then chief of the astronaut corps, Young was flying a shuttle training aircraft high above Kennedy Space Center when Challenger ruptured. He took pictures of the nose-diving crew cabin. The seven Challenger astronauts never knew of all the dangerous O-ring seal trouble leading up to their flight. "If I had known these things, I would have made them aware, that's for damn sure," Young wrote in his book.

Young noted that even his friends at NASA considered him "doom and gloom," and that a shuttle launch "always scared me more than it thrilled me."

He always thought the probability was there for a space shuttle accident, he observed in his autobiography, given that it was "such an incredibly complex machine."

"It wasn't pessimism. It was just being realistic," he wrote.

Yet Young maintained that NASA and the nation should accept an occasional spaceflight failure, saying it's worth the risk.

"I really believe we should be operating (the shuttle), flying it right now, because there's just not a lot we can do to make it any better," Young said in 2004, a year after the Columbia tragedy. Another year passed before shuttle flights resumed.

Throughout the 1990s and into the 2000s, Young maintained the United States should be doing two to three times the amount of space exploration that it was doing. NASA should be developing massive rockets to lift payloads to the moon to industrialize it, he said, and building space systems for detecting and deflecting comets or asteroids that could threaten Earth.

"The country needs it. The world needs it. Civilization needs it," Young said in 2000, adding with a chuckle, "I don't need it. I'm not going to be here that long."

In his book, Young noted that his "relentless" stream of memos about volcanic super-eruptions and killer asteroids was aimed at scaring and educating at the same time. Humans need to start living off the planet in order to save the species, he stressed again and again, pointing to the moon. "Some folks surely regarded me as a crackpot," he wrote. "But that didn't stop me."

Young spent his last 17 years at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston in management, focusing on safety issues. He retired at the end of 2004, seven months shy of NASA's return to space following the Columbia accident.

Young was born Sept. 24, 1930 and grew up in Orlando, Fla. He became interested early on in aviation, making model planes. He spent his last high school summer working on a surveying team. The job took him to Titusville due east of Orlando; he never imagined that one day he would be sitting on rockets across the Indian River, blasting off for the moon.

He earned an aeronautical engineering degree from Georgia Institute of Technology in 1952 and went on to join the Navy and serve in Korea as a gunnery officer. He eventually became a Navy fighter pilot and test pilot.

Young received more than 100 major accolades in his lifetime, including the prestigious Congressional Space Medal of Honor in 1981.

Even after leaving NASA, he worked to keep the space flame alive, noting in his official NASA biography that he was continuing to advocate the development of technologies "that will allow us to live and work on the moon and Mars."

"Those technologies over the long (or short) haul will save civilization on Earth," he warned in his NASA bio, almost as a parting shot.

Dunn reported from Cape Canaveral, Fla.
Diner
2018-01-06 21:26:53 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by That Derek
http://www.chicagotribune.com/news/nationworld/ct-john-young-dead-20180106-story.html
Counting his takeoff from the moon in 1972 as commander of Apollo 16, his blastoff tally stood at seven, for decades a world record.
Well, that would make it a world-and-moon record, I guess.
c***@aol.com
2018-01-06 21:42:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
How many moonwalkers left?
David Carson
2018-01-06 23:34:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by That Derek
http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-010618a-astronaut-john-young-obituary.html
It's a nice, thorough obit, but it omits one outstanding thing about him,
which is that he maintained his active flight status at least into the
late 90s - I can't find the exact year.

In the 1998 film, "Deep Impact," a crew of astronauts are sent to explode
a bomb on a comet that's on a collision course with Earth. All of the crew
are young, except for one old astronaut played by Robert Duvall, who is an
old fogie from the Apollo days. He's on the mission because the astronauts
have to land on the comet, and he's the only astronaut NASA has who has
ever landed a spaceship. I always wondered whether the writers were
thinking of Young when they came up with that.

David Carson
--
Dead or Alive Data Base
http://www.doadb.com
J.D. Baldwin
2018-01-07 00:20:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by That Derek
John Young, ninth astronaut on moon, led first shuttle mission, dies
Young is the only Mercury / Gemini / Apollo era astronaut I ever met,
though I did see Lovell at an event once, and I have a few friends who
knew Pete Conrad.

I was a Navy flight student in 1985 and I flew with an instructor to
Patrick AFB, which is south of Cape Canaveral. On our approach, we
could see shuttles on the pads. I'd never seen that, so I was already
kind of awed. We landed and went and got some lunch, then I had to
run off to base operations to file a flight plan for our return trip
to Pensacola.

Young was standing in base ops, wearing a flight suit and flight
jacket, filing a flight plan of his own and chatting with the desk
guy. I had no idea who it was, but I saw that he was a salty dog
based on the patches on his flight jacket. (USS Forrestal is the only
one I remember.) He didn't have any space program patches on his
jacket. Then I saw his nametag, correlated it with my estimate of his
age, and realized that it might be who it was.

I was trying to play it cool and fill out my paperwork (which, back
then, was done on actual physical paper). Then there was a lull in
his conversation and I just blurted out, "Excuse me, Captain, are you
*the* John Young?"

He said, "I'm *a* John Young, I guess."

I popped right back with "Are you the John Young who went to the
moon?" He grinned and said yes and stuck out his hand. I introduced
myself and said it was an honor to meet him. He asked me what I was
up to and I told him I was filing to go back to Pensacola. He asked
me what I was flying, and I pointed to the T-2 on the tarmac. He
asked how I'd done on my flight out, and I told him it hadn't been
graded yet, but I hadn't done anything especially stupid (which was
true). He said "Well, try to have as many of those days as you can."

And that was that, and I haven't shut up about the story since. Very
nice guy. Wish I'd asked for an autograph.
--
_+_ From the catapult of |If anyone objects to any statement I make, I am
_|70|___:)=}- J.D. Baldwin |quite prepared not only to retract it, but also
\ / ***@panix.com|to deny under oath that I ever made it.-T. Lehrer
***~~~~----------------------------------------------------------------------
Steve Hayes
2018-01-07 03:28:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 6 Jan 2018 09:40:39 -0800 (PST), That Derek
<***@yahoo.com> wrote:

http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-010618a-astronaut-john-young-obituary.html

John Young, ninth astronaut on moon, led first shuttle mission, dies

January 6, 2018 — John Young, NASA's longest-serving astronaut, who
walked on the moon and flew on the first Gemini and space shuttle
missions, has died.

The first person to fly six times into space — seven, if you count his
launch off of the moon in 1972 — and the only astronaut to command
four different types of spacecraft, Young died on Friday (Jan. 5). He
was 87.

"We're saddened by the loss of astronaut John Young," NASA stated on
Saturday.

Selected alongside Neil Armstrong and Jim Lovell with NASA's second
group of astronauts in 1962, Young flew two Gemini missions, two
Apollo missions and two space shuttle missions. He was one of only
three astronauts to launch to the moon twice and was the ninth person
to step foot on the lunar surface.

In total, Young logged 34 days, 19 hours and 39 minutes flying in
space, including 20 hours and 14 minutes walking on the moon.

"I've been very lucky, I think," said Young in a NASA interview in
2004, when he retired from the space agency after 42 years.

Young made the first of his six missions as the pilot on the maiden
flight of Gemini, NASA's two-seater spacecraft. Flying with original
Mercury astronaut Virgil "Gus" Grissom, Young launched on the nearly
five-hour Gemini 3 mission on March 23, 1965, putting the new vehicle
through its paces while also taking a bite or two from a later
infamous corned beef sandwich that he smuggled aboard the flight.

Gemini 3 "was a truly excellent engineering test flight of the
vehicle," Young wrote in his 2012 memoirs, "Forever Young."

Young commanded his second spaceflight, Gemini 10, in July 1966. The
three-day mission climbed to more than 400 miles (760 kilometers)
above Earth to measure the risk posed by radiation, conducted the
program's first double rendezvous with two Agena target vehicles and
included two spacewalks by pilot Michael Collins.

On the Apollo 10 mission in May 1969, Young became the first person to
orbit the moon alone. A full-up dress rehearsal for the first lunar
landing two months later, Young stayed aboard the command module
"Charlie Brown" while his crewmates, Thomas Stafford and Eugene
Cernan, flew "Snoopy," the Apollo 10 lunar module, to within 47,000
feet (14 km) of the moon's surface.

On their return to Earth, Young, Stafford and Cernan set a record for
the highest speed achieved by astronauts aboard a spacecraft: 24,791
mph (39,897 km/h) on May 26, 1969.

Young got his chance to walk on the moon in April 1972, as commander
of Apollo 16, the fifth and penultimate Apollo lunar landing. Young
and Charles Duke landed the "Orion" lunar module in the Descartes
highlands for a nearly three-day stay.

"There you are, mysterious and unknown Descartes – Highland plains,"
described Young, as he took his first steps on the moon

Exhibiting his dry wit, Young then compared his situation to a Joel
Chandler Harris story, adapted for the Disney movie "Song of the
South," to express how fortunate he felt to be on the moon.

"I'm sure glad they got ol' Br'er Rabbit here," he remarked, "back in
the briar patch where he belongs."

Over the course of three excursions across the boulder-strewn surface,
Young and Duke explored more than 16 miles (26 km), becoming the
second crew to drive a lunar rover. As they went, they collected 211
pounds (96 kilograms) of moon rocks and lunar soil, which they brought
back to Earth with Apollo 16 command module pilot Thomas "Ken"
Mattingly.

During their first moonwalk, Young and Duke received word from Mission
Control that the U.S. Congress had approved the funding to develop the
space shuttle.

"The country needs that shuttle mighty bad," Young said in response.
"You'll see."

Although he had no way of knowing it at the time, Young would next
make history commanding the first flight of the space shuttle nine
years later, almost to the day.

Young and Robert Crippen launched on space shuttle Columbia on April
12, 1981. Because of the way the orbiter had been designed, it could
not be tested in space without a crew.

"I think if you look at all the things we had to do, flying a winged
launch vehicle into space without any previous unmanned test, it
probably was very bold," Young told collectSPACE in 2006, on the 25th
anniversary of the STS-1 mission.

For two days and six hours, Young and Crippen tested Columbia's
systems before returning to Earth like no other orbital spacecraft had
done before — with wings, gliding to a touchdown on the dry lake bed
at Edwards Air Force Base in southern California.

"This is the world's greatest flying machine, I'll tell you that,"
stated Young, as the orbiter came to a wheels stop under his control.

Young's then-record sixth space mission returned him to the
commander's seat on board Columbia for the orbiter's sixth mission in
November 1983. This time, Young led a crew of five, including the
first international astronaut to fly on the shuttle, Ulf Merbold of
the European Space Agency (ESA).

STS-9 also marked the the first flight of the European-built Spacelab
laboratory, a pressurized module that was mounted inside the orbiter's
payload bay. The 10-day mission carried out 72 experiments in
astronomy, astrobiology, material sciences and Earth observation.

On Dec. 8, 1983, Columbia made a pre-dawn landing at Edwards,
returning Young to Earth for the last time.

John Watts Young was born on Sept. 24, 1930, in San Francisco,
California. When he was 18 months old, Young's parents moved, first to
Georgia and then Orlando, Florida, where he attended elementary and
high school.

Young earned his bachelor of science degree in aeronautical
engineering from the Georgia Institute of Technology in 1952.

After graduation, he entered the U.S. Navy, serving on the destroyer
USS Laws in the Korean War and then entering flight training before
being assigned to a fighter squadron for four years.

Young graduated from the U.S. Navy Test Pilot School in 1959 and
served at the Naval Air Test Center at Naval Air Station Patuxent
River in Maryland, where he evaluated Crusader and Phantom fighter
weapons systems. In 1962, he set world time-to-climb records to 3,000
and 25,000-meter (82,021 and 9,843-feet) altitudes in the F-4 Phantom.

Young retired from the U.S. Navy with the rank of captain in 1976.
Over the course of his flying career, he logged more than 15,275 hours
in props, jets, helicopters and rocket jets, including more than 9,200
hours in NASA's T-38 astronaut training jets.

In addition to his own six spaceflights, Young also served on five
backup crews, including backup pilot for Gemini 6; backup command
module pilot for the second Apollo mission (as slated before the
Apollo 1 fire) and Apollo 7, the first crewed Apollo launch; and
backup commander for Apollo 13 and Apollo 17.

In 1974, Young was named the fifth chief of the Astronaut Office,
after serving for a year as the office's space shuttle branch chief.
For 13 years, Young led NASA's astronaut corps, overseeing the crews
assigned to the Apollo-Soyuz Test Project, the approach and landing
tests with the prototype orbiter Enterprise, and the first 25 space
shuttle missions.

After the loss of space shuttle Challenger and its seven-person crew
in January 1986, Young penned internal memos critical of NASA's
attention to safety, a topic he had championed since his days flying
Gemini. Young expressed concern over schedule pressure and wrote that
other astronauts who had launched on missions preceding the ill-fated
STS-51L mission were "very lucky" to be alive.

Young was subsequently reassigned to be special assistant to the
director of the Johnson Space Center for engineering, operations and
safety until 1996, when he was named the associate director for
technical affairs, a position he held until his retirement from NASA
on Dec. 31, 2004.

Young was the recipient of many honors for his contributions to space
exploration, including the Congressional Space Medal of Honor, NASA
Distinguished Service Medal, Rotary National Space Achievement Award,
and six honorary doctorates. Young was inducted into the National
Aviation Hall of Fame in 1988 and Astronaut Hall of Fame in 1993.

He was awarded the NASA Ambassador of Exploration in 2005, including a
moon rock he assigned for display at the Houston Museum of Natural
Science, and was bestowed the General James E. Hill Lifetime Space
Achievement Award from the Space Foundation in 2010. A stretch of
Florida State Road 423 that runs through Orlando is named John Young
Parkway in his honor.

Young is survived by his wife Susy, two children, Sandra and John, who
he had with his first wife, Barbara White, and three grandchildren.
Loading...