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Joan Lee (nee Clayton), 93, wife of Marvel mogul Stan Lee
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That Derek
2017-07-06 23:42:43 UTC
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http://www.hollywoodreporter.com/heat-vision/joan-lee-dead-wife-marvel-comics-legend-stan-lee-was-93-1018951

July 06, 2017 3:35pm PT
by Andy Lewis

Joan Lee, Wife of Marvel Comics Legend Stan Lee, Dies at 93

The pair, who met when the Marvel boss was supposed to take her friend on a date, were married for 69 years.

Joan Lee, the wife of Marvel Comics legend Stan Lee, died Thursday in Los Angeles. She was 93.

"I can confirm the sad news that Joan Lee passed away this morning quietly and surrounded by her family," a spokesperson for Stan Lee and his family said in a statement to The Hollywood Reporter. "The family ask that you please give them time to grieve and respect their privacy during this difficult time."

Joan Lee suffered a stroke earlier in the week and was hospitalized, according to sources.

The former British hat model and Lee were married on Dec. 5, 1947, and were by all accounts hopelessly devoted to each other. They had two children: J.C. (Joan Celia), who was born in 1950, and Jan, who died three days after her birth in 1953.

Last year, Lee recounted how he met his wife in a story for THR that celebrated his 75th anniversary in comics. After a childhood sweetheart wed another woman, Joan Clayton impulsively married an American soldier during World War II and moved to New York, where she was extremely unhappy. Meanwhile, a cousin of Lee's wanted to set up the struggling writer with a hat model. Lee tells what happened next:

"When I was young, there was one girl I drew; one body and face and hair. It was my idea of what a girl should be. The perfect woman. And when I got out of the Army, somebody, a cousin of mine, knew a model, a hat model at a place called Laden Hats. He said, 'Stan, there's this really pretty girl named Betty. I think you’d like her. She might like you. Why don’t you go over and ask her to lunch.' Blah, blah, blah.

"So I went up to this place. Betty didn’t answer the door. But Joan answered, and she was the head model. I took one look at her — and she was the girl I had been drawing all my life. And then I heard the English accent. And I’m a nut for English accents! She said, 'May I help you?' And I took a look at her, and I think I said something crazy like, 'I love you.' I don’t remember exactly. But anyway, I took her to lunch. I never met Betty, the other girl. I think I proposed to [Joan] at lunch.”

In those days, the quickest way to get divorced was to move to Nevada and stay for six weeks to establish residency. Soon after Joan arrived in Reno, Stan received a letter from her addressed to "Jack," and that worried him.

“Now I’m not the smartest guy in world,” recalled Lee. “I know my name isn’t 'Jack.' And so why did she write 'Dear Jack?' Maybe I better go to Reno and see what’s going on. I got there and she was waiting for me. And there’s three guys with her. They all look like John Wayne. Big Western guys! Rugged! And I get off the plane fresh from New York with my little pork pie hat and a little scarf and my gloves. And she’s with me. I thought, 'I don’t have a chance.' Luckily, I had a chance.”

A judge granted Joan her divorce and about an hour later, he married her and Lee in a room next door.

The couple returned to New York, where Lee worked at Marvel Comics forerunner Timely/Atlas Comics, a job he initially landed because his cousin Martin Goodman owned the company. Comics were a middling enterprise until Lee and Jack Kirby co-created The Fantastic Four in 1961 (followed by the Hulk, Avengers, Iron Man, X-Men and other characters) and turned the company, renamed Marvel Comics, into a pop culture powerhouse.

In some versions of the origin of the Fantastic Four, Lee credits Joan with inspiring him. He was depressed about his career (Lee had dreams of becoming a serious novelist) and the state of comics (the industry in the 1950s was dominated by stories of war, science fiction and romance, genres he didn’t like) and contemplated leaving the business.

"Before you quit," Joan told him, "why don’t you write one comic you are proud of?" And thus was born the Fantastic Four.

In 1981, the Lees moved from New York City to California so Stan could work on developing Marvel TV and film projects. Joan did voice work on two 1990s animated Marvel shows, Fantastic Four (as Miss Forbes) and Spider-Man (as Madame Web). She also made a cameo in 2016’s X-Men: Apocalypse.

Joan Lee also wrote a 1987 novel, The Pleasure Palace, about a man striving to build the most luxurious ocean liner ever while romancing several women at once. According to her daughter, she had three more unpublished but finished novels at home).

Borys Kit contributed to this report.
A Friend
2017-07-07 02:26:46 UTC
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Post by That Derek
In those days, the quickest way to get divorced was to move to Nevada and
stay for six weeks to establish residency. Soon after Joan arrived in Reno,
Stan received a letter from her addressed to "Jack," and that worried him.
“Now I’m not the smartest guy in world,” recalled Lee. “I know my name isn’t
'Jack.' And so why did she write 'Dear Jack?'
Keep an eye out for KIRBY: THE UNTOLD STORY.
Bryan Styble
2017-07-07 03:28:51 UTC
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As a fellow who as a pre-teen was immersed in comics--though a naive partisan of DC over Marvel for most of that time, not having matured enough in those days to appreciate the more serious general approach to their characters that Marvel demonstrated--I thought I knew a lot about the seemingly immortal Stan Lee.

But I had no idea he was one of those fortunate few to be utterly lucky in love--almost seven decades of being "hopelessly devoted" to one another; way to go Stan and Joan!

BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
Louis Epstein
2017-07-07 07:09:59 UTC
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Post by Bryan Styble
As a fellow who as a pre-teen was immersed in comics--though a naive partisan of DC over Marvel for most of that time,
Harrumph...I will always consider DC *THE* comic-book house,however they may have mismanaged properties over time.
Post by Bryan Styble
not having matured enough in those days to appreciate the more serious general approach to their characters that
Marvel demonstrated--I thought I knew a lot about the seemingly immortal Stan Lee.
But I had no idea he was one of those fortunate few to be utterly lucky in love--almost seven decades of being
"hopelessly devoted" to one another; way to go Stan and Joan!
BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
Bryan Styble
2017-07-07 09:23:28 UTC
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Well, Louis, DC certainly had two HUGE advantages over Marvel, character-wise:

The Batman, who wasn't dependent upon ANY superhuman or supernatural power--and thus achieved as much verisimilitude as costumed-crimefighter comic books can ever muster; and

The Flash, who not only boasts the creatively best boutique of powers--i.e., but a single one, instead of the downright dumb Superman Family approach, which was to have Superman, Supergirl and even Krypto the Super Dog displaying numerous super-this and super-that abilities that presumably even extended to exuding super-body odor--but ALSO had, for my childhood money*, the coolest costume in either the DC or Marvel universe**.

Although oddly enough, even THOSE striking crimson-with-yellow-accents togs are maybe outdone by the second-generation Kid Flash costume--whose expanding-out-of-the-storage-ring uniform trick that his eventual uncle Barry Allen pioneered had the additional feature of spraying a substance to alter alter-ego Wally West's hair from red to brown to mislead people as to the secret identify of the kid with that nifty red-accented yellow outfit that exposed the top of his head.

BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
__________________________________________________________________________________________
* Still 12 cents, when I started collecting them in the wake of the wacky West/Ward debut on Wednesday evening, January 12, 1966.
** With maybe the exceptions of Dr. Fate and The Spectre, although that latter character and his powers were positively preposterous, even by comic book superhero standards.
David Carson
2017-07-07 13:02:48 UTC
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On Fri, 7 Jul 2017 02:23:28 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Styble
Post by Bryan Styble
The Batman, who wasn't dependent upon ANY superhuman or supernatural power--and thus achieved as much verisimilitude as costumed-crimefighter comic books can ever muster; and
When I was little, I didn't care for Batman. I liked Flash, Green Lantern,
even Red Tornado better. But when I grew up, I lost all interest in all of
them *except* Batman.
Post by Bryan Styble
The Flash, who not only boasts the creatively best boutique of powers--i.e., but a single one, instead of the downright dumb Superman Family approach, which was to have Superman, Supergirl and even Krypto the Super Dog displaying numerous super-this and super-that abilities that presumably even extended to exuding super-body odor--but ALSO had, for my childhood money*, the coolest costume in either the DC or Marvel universe**.
I consider Flash's overused and over-the-top ability to control the motion
of the molecules of his body to be a second superpower that is, at best,
only tangentially connected to his ability to run fast. But you're right
about Superman; everything about him is ridiculous. He is such a
poorly-conceived character that if comics were starting over, he would not
be invented.
l***@yahoo.com
2017-07-11 17:16:44 UTC
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Post by David Carson
On Fri, 7 Jul 2017 02:23:28 -0700 (PDT), Bryan Styble
Post by Bryan Styble
The Batman, who wasn't dependent upon ANY superhuman or supernatural power--and thus achieved as much verisimilitude as costumed-crimefighter comic books can ever muster; and
When I was little, I didn't care for Batman. I liked Flash, Green Lantern,
even Red Tornado better. But when I grew up, I lost all interest in all of
them *except* Batman.
On Batman and Superman:


Loading Image...:medium

From FoxTrot, July 21, 1991. For some reason, the third panel is missing - it should show Peter saying "oh come on - TELL me it wouldn't be fun to drive the Batmobile. I don't think Superman even HAS a car."


Lenona.
Louis Epstein
2017-07-10 17:48:00 UTC
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Post by Bryan Styble
The Batman, who wasn't dependent upon ANY superhuman or supernatural power--and thus achieved as much verisimilitude as costumed-crimefighter comic books can ever muster; and
The Flash, who not only boasts the creatively best boutique of powers--i.e., but a single one, instead of the downright dumb Superman Family approach, which was to have Superman, Supergirl and even Krypto the Super Dog displaying numerous super-this and super-that abilities that presumably even extended to exuding super-body odor--but ALSO had, for my childhood money*, the coolest costume in either the DC or Marvel universe**.
Although oddly enough, even THOSE striking crimson-with-yellow-accents
togs are maybe outdone by the second-generation Kid Flash costume--whose
expanding-out-of-the-storage-ring uniform trick that his eventual uncle
Barry Allen pioneered had the additional feature of spraying a substance
to alter alter-ego Wally West's hair from red to brown to mislead people
as to the secret identify of the kid with that nifty red-accented yellow
outfit that exposed the top of his head.
Did the hairspray get washed out when he reverted?

I think Black Canary was the first superheroine to wear a wig,can't
be sure,but did no bad guy ever knock it over?...she didn't have a
tight mask to hold it on like TV-Batgirl.
Post by Bryan Styble
BRYAN STYBLE/Florida
__________________________________________________________________________________________
* Still 12 cents, when I started collecting them in the wake of the wacky West/Ward debut on Wednesday evening, January 12, 1966.
** With maybe the exceptions of Dr. Fate and The Spectre, although that
latter character and his powers were positively preposterous, even by
comic book superhero standards.
-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.
Travoltron
2017-07-14 17:06:18 UTC
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Nobody stays dead at Marvel except for Uncle Ben.
RH Draney
2017-07-14 20:14:31 UTC
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Post by Travoltron
Nobody stays dead at Marvel except for Uncle Ben.
Uncle Ben didn't die, he was converted....r

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