Discussion:
historical 'Liberty Tree' of Brockton, MA, 300 years old, dies of old age
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Hoodoo
2004-12-16 17:58:27 UTC
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'Liberty Tree' lives on long after it is gone

http://enterprise.southofboston.com/articles/2004/12/16/news/opinion/opinion01.txt

MONDAY was one of the sadder days in recent Brockton history when
the famed three-centuries-old "Liberty Tree" died of old age. It
is not, however, a "tragedy," as one interested observer claimed.

The sprawling sycamore on newly named Frederick Douglass Avenue —
formerly High Street — was cut down, deemed a danger and
virtually unsalvageable by all the arborists who examined it. It
had a six-foot crack in its trunk from a recent storm, rot had
set in and its huge branches were in danger of falling. There was
really no choice but to let the old tree die.

But that does not mean it will be forgotten. Nor will Brockton
residents forget what it has symbolized — nothing less than
freedom. The tree was a gathering place for 19th century
abolitionists — Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison and others. It
later became a landmark for suffragists such as Lucy Stone and
Lucretia Mott, who gave speeches at the site in their quest to
gain the vote for women. The tree stood next to a house owned by
Edward E. Bennett, who used his property as a stop for the
Underground Railroad. Many important people and the souls they
fought for were nurtured in the shadow of the graceful sycamore.

It was suggested that the tree could possibly be saved at a cost
of about $400,000. Brockton NAACP President-elect Oswald Jordan
Jr. called that a small price to pay to keep the tree alive. It
was Jordan who, gathering pieces of fallen Liberty Tree wood as
souvenirs, said cutting it down was a tragedy.

But who can really defend spending $400,000 to save a tree when
that money could buy thousands of books for students or provide
medical treatment for hundreds of people? The tree is a symbol
and symbols don't fade when they are no longer present. Just ask
people in New Hampshire who revere the Old Man in the Mountain,
which slid into oblivion 19 months ago.

City officials have stored much of the wood that remained from
the Liberty Tree. We hope they use it to raise funds to pay for
the small city park that has long been planned near the tree.

The park will not enjoy the shade once provided by the Liberty
Tree, but will bask in the glow of the sun from the open sky and
in the warmth of history. Living monuments don't last forever,
but can give birth to ideals that may live a very long time. That
is not a tragedy by any means.
--
Oh, smell your harmonica. Go on, smell it son. - Johnny 'Guitar'
Watson
MadCow57
2004-12-17 10:32:40 UTC
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Post by Hoodoo
The sprawling sycamore on newly named Frederick Douglass Avenue —
formerly High Street — was cut down, . . <<

So sad. Too bad it couldn't have gone out like the Wye Oak in Maryland -
whacked by lightning in a terrific storm.
Hoodoo
2004-12-17 13:41:16 UTC
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Post by MadCow57
Post by Hoodoo
The sprawling sycamore on newly named Frederick Douglass Avenue —
formerly High Street — was cut down, . . <<
So sad. Too bad it couldn't have gone out like the Wye Oak in Maryland -
whacked by lightning in a terrific storm.
They should at least utilize the wood for something unique like this:

http://westsidenewsonline.com/Business/stutzman.html

Legacy of Liberty Tree lives on through very special guitars

For almost 400 years, a lone tulip poplar called the Liberty Tree
grew on what today is the campus of St. John's College in
Annapolis, Maryland. In the 1760s, it served as a meeting place
for freedom-minded American Colonists; during and after the
Revolutionary War, it stood sentinel over the difficult birth and
infancy of our nation; in the ensuing centuries, it provided
shade for Union soldiers, presidents, visiting dignitaries,
Fourth of July revelers, and intellectual discussion groups. The
Liberty Tree finally succumbed to the ravages of Hurricane Floyd
in September 1999.

But the legacy of the Maryland Liberty Tree did not die with the
tree; it is being preserved in Liberty Tree Guitars. The
limited-edition guitars - only 400 are being produced - began
arriving on April 3 at select Taylor dealers throughout America.
"We are proud to be among the Taylor dealers that will carry this
magnificent instrument," said Dave Stutzman of Stutzman's Guitar
Center. '"I can't think of a better use of the Liberty Tree wood
than to have it crafted into a beautiful guitar that will last
for generations."

Crafted by Taylor Guitars from the actual Liberty Tree, each
instrument conveys the unique American spirit embodied by the
tree itself. It is decorated with inlaid depictions of the
Colonial flags that flew during and after the American
Revolution, and a scrolled portion of the Declaration of
Independence, thus representing the powerful convergence of
history, craftsmanship, and the promise of a lasting legacy.

The story of America's Liberty Trees, though not widely known, is
rich with symbolism. Each of the original 13 American colonies
designated a Liberty Tree (or, in some cases, a Liberty Pole)
under which the Colonists would rally to seek solidarity in their
quest for independence from Great Britain. The first Liberty Tree
was located in Boston, Massachusetts, on the corner of today's
Essex and Washington Streets.

In 1766, Maryland dedicated its own Liberty Tree, a tulip poplar,
on the grounds of what was then King William's School, in
Annapolis. Under its boughs, patriots such as Samuel Chase gave
speeches and led rebels in singing protest songs. As patriotic
fervor grew, the Liberty Tree became the staging area for the
Annapolitans' pro-independence activities.

Recognizing the Liberty Trees' symbolic power, the British
destroyed some of them during the Revolutionary War. Others died
of old age or disease or at the hands of the elements. Only the
Maryland Liberty Tree survived to the ripe old age of 400,
withstanding war, changing seasons, lightning strikes, vandalism,
and even souvenir hunters. When it was irreparably damaged by
Hurricane Floyd in September 1999, experts declared that the
90-foot-tall living landmark had become a safety hazard. School
officials were compelled to cut it down on October 25, 1999,
following a ceremony of great pomp and circumstance.

A few months later, Taylor Guitars received a call asking if the
company would be interested in buying a salvaged portion of the
Maryland Liberty Tree. Honored by the opportunity to pay tribute
to this noble piece of American history, Bob Taylor, founder and
president of Taylor Guitars, bought the wood and set out to
preserve the legacy of the Liberty Tree in finely crafted
commemorative guitars.

Taylor purchased approximately 30,000 pounds of the wood from an
Annapolis landscaper who had salvaged the Maryland Liberty Tree
from a landfill. The wood-processing, cutting, curing, designing,
and creation of the first guitar took 18 months, and the result
is an instrument so awe-inspiring that the entire limited-edition
run of 400 guitars immediately was purchased by dealers across
the country.

A portion (5%) of the proceeds from the sale of each Liberty Tree
Guitar will be donated to the American Forests Historic Tree
Nursery Project, known for its innovative program of propagating
offspring from hundreds of trees of historical significance.

In early May, Taylor Guitars and Historic Trees will present one
of 14 seedlings from the Maryland Liberty Tree to White House
representatives during a reception on Capitol Hill. This first
tree will be planted in the new U.S. Botanic Garden. The other 13
seedlings will be presented over the next few months to the
governors of states that were the original 13 Colonies, beginning
with Maryland.

Taylor Guitars was founded in 1974 by guitar makers Bob Taylor
and Kurt Listug and is located in El Cajon, California, a suburb
of San Diego. Stutzman's Guitar Center has been a Taylor dealer
in the Rochester area since 1977.

- - -

More info and images at the official Taylor website:

http://www.taylorguitars.com/guitars/models/limiteds/liberty/

Related links on that webpage:

# Explore the complete story of the Liberty Tree Guitar
# Find out more about the Liberty Tree Video
# Read about recent Liberty Tree seedling presentations
--
Oh, smell your harmonica. Go on, smell it son. - Johnny 'Guitar'
Watson
Bill Schenley
2004-12-17 17:21:45 UTC
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Crafted by Taylor Guitars ...
John Kerry plays a Taylor guitar ...
Hoodoo
2004-12-18 03:53:42 UTC
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Post by Bill Schenley
Crafted by Taylor Guitars ...
John Kerry plays a Taylor guitar ...
Lots of musicians do since they're very good instruments.
--
Oh, smell your harmonica. Go on, smell it son. - Johnny 'Guitar'
Watson
TVC
2004-12-18 05:21:13 UTC
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Not that it means anything specifically, but I lived in Brockton or next
door to it from the age of 13 through 44 and am familiar with High Street,
and I never heard of this Liberty Tree or of any of the activity it
symbolizes. :-(
1***@gmail.com
2017-08-28 23:42:23 UTC
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Post by Hoodoo
'Liberty Tree' lives on long after it is gone
http://enterprise.southofboston.com/articles/2004/12/16/news/opinion/opinion01.txt
MONDAY was one of the sadder days in recent Brockton history when
the famed three-centuries-old "Liberty Tree" died of old age. It
is not, however, a "tragedy," as one interested observer claimed.
The sprawling sycamore on newly named Frederick Douglass Avenue —
formerly High Street — was cut down, deemed a danger and
virtually unsalvageable by all the arborists who examined it. It
had a six-foot crack in its trunk from a recent storm, rot had
set in and its huge branches were in danger of falling. There was
really no choice but to let the old tree die.
But that does not mean it will be forgotten. Nor will Brockton
residents forget what it has symbolized — nothing less than
freedom. The tree was a gathering place for 19th century
abolitionists — Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison and others. It
later became a landmark for suffragists such as Lucy Stone and
Lucretia Mott, who gave speeches at the site in their quest to
gain the vote for women. The tree stood next to a house owned by
Edward E. Bennett, who used his property as a stop for the
Underground Railroad. Many important people and the souls they
fought for were nurtured in the shadow of the graceful sycamore.
It was suggested that the tree could possibly be saved at a cost
of about $400,000. Brockton NAACP President-elect Oswald Jordan
Jr. called that a small price to pay to keep the tree alive. It
was Jordan who, gathering pieces of fallen Liberty Tree wood as
souvenirs, said cutting it down was a tragedy.
But who can really defend spending $400,000 to save a tree when
that money could buy thousands of books for students or provide
medical treatment for hundreds of people? The tree is a symbol
and symbols don't fade when they are no longer present. Just ask
people in New Hampshire who revere the Old Man in the Mountain,
which slid into oblivion 19 months ago.
City officials have stored much of the wood that remained from
the Liberty Tree. We hope they use it to raise funds to pay for
the small city park that has long been planned near the tree.
The park will not enjoy the shade once provided by the Liberty
Tree, but will bask in the glow of the sun from the open sky and
in the warmth of history. Living monuments don't last forever,
but can give birth to ideals that may live a very long time. That
is not a tragedy by any means.
--
Oh, smell your harmonica. Go on, smell it son. - Johnny 'Guitar'
Watson
there is a large "shoot", growing out of the root system where the iron fence and 1959 high school plaque is. The Liberty Tree lives on.
Louis Epstein
2017-08-30 13:09:04 UTC
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Post by 1***@gmail.com
Post by Hoodoo
'Liberty Tree' lives on long after it is gone
http://enterprise.southofboston.com/articles/2004/12/16/news/opinion/opinion01.txt
MONDAY was one of the sadder days in recent Brockton history when
the famed three-centuries-old "Liberty Tree" died of old age. It
is not, however, a "tragedy," as one interested observer claimed.
The sprawling sycamore on newly named Frederick Douglass Avenue ?
formerly High Street ? was cut down, deemed a danger and
virtually unsalvageable by all the arborists who examined it. It
had a six-foot crack in its trunk from a recent storm, rot had
set in and its huge branches were in danger of falling. There was
really no choice but to let the old tree die.
But that does not mean it will be forgotten. Nor will Brockton
residents forget what it has symbolized ? nothing less than
freedom. The tree was a gathering place for 19th century
abolitionists ? Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison and others. It
later became a landmark for suffragists such as Lucy Stone and
Lucretia Mott, who gave speeches at the site in their quest to
gain the vote for women. The tree stood next to a house owned by
Edward E. Bennett, who used his property as a stop for the
Underground Railroad. Many important people and the souls they
fought for were nurtured in the shadow of the graceful sycamore.
It was suggested that the tree could possibly be saved at a cost
of about $400,000. Brockton NAACP President-elect Oswald Jordan
Jr. called that a small price to pay to keep the tree alive. It
was Jordan who, gathering pieces of fallen Liberty Tree wood as
souvenirs, said cutting it down was a tragedy.
But who can really defend spending $400,000 to save a tree when
that money could buy thousands of books for students or provide
medical treatment for hundreds of people? The tree is a symbol
and symbols don't fade when they are no longer present. Just ask
people in New Hampshire who revere the Old Man in the Mountain,
which slid into oblivion 19 months ago.
City officials have stored much of the wood that remained from
the Liberty Tree. We hope they use it to raise funds to pay for
the small city park that has long been planned near the tree.
The park will not enjoy the shade once provided by the Liberty
Tree, but will bask in the glow of the sun from the open sky and
in the warmth of history. Living monuments don't last forever,
but can give birth to ideals that may live a very long time. That
is not a tragedy by any means.
there is a large "shoot", growing out of the root system where the iron
fence and 1959 high school plaque is. The Liberty Tree lives on.
Good to know!

-=-=-
The World Trade Center towers MUST rise again,
at least as tall as before...or terror has triumphed.

1***@gmail.com
2017-08-28 23:45:07 UTC
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Post by Hoodoo
'Liberty Tree' lives on long after it is gone
http://enterprise.southofboston.com/articles/2004/12/16/news/opinion/opinion01.txt
MONDAY was one of the sadder days in recent Brockton history when
the famed three-centuries-old "Liberty Tree" died of old age. It
is not, however, a "tragedy," as one interested observer claimed.
The sprawling sycamore on newly named Frederick Douglass Avenue —
formerly High Street — was cut down, deemed a danger and
virtually unsalvageable by all the arborists who examined it. It
had a six-foot crack in its trunk from a recent storm, rot had
set in and its huge branches were in danger of falling. There was
really no choice but to let the old tree die.
But that does not mean it will be forgotten. Nor will Brockton
residents forget what it has symbolized — nothing less than
freedom. The tree was a gathering place for 19th century
abolitionists — Douglass, William Lloyd Garrison and others. It
later became a landmark for suffragists such as Lucy Stone and
Lucretia Mott, who gave speeches at the site in their quest to
gain the vote for women. The tree stood next to a house owned by
Edward E. Bennett, who used his property as a stop for the
Underground Railroad. Many important people and the souls they
fought for were nurtured in the shadow of the graceful sycamore.
It was suggested that the tree could possibly be saved at a cost
of about $400,000. Brockton NAACP President-elect Oswald Jordan
Jr. called that a small price to pay to keep the tree alive. It
was Jordan who, gathering pieces of fallen Liberty Tree wood as
souvenirs, said cutting it down was a tragedy.
But who can really defend spending $400,000 to save a tree when
that money could buy thousands of books for students or provide
medical treatment for hundreds of people? The tree is a symbol
and symbols don't fade when they are no longer present. Just ask
people in New Hampshire who revere the Old Man in the Mountain,
which slid into oblivion 19 months ago.
City officials have stored much of the wood that remained from
the Liberty Tree. We hope they use it to raise funds to pay for
the small city park that has long been planned near the tree.
The park will not enjoy the shade once provided by the Liberty
Tree, but will bask in the glow of the sun from the open sky and
in the warmth of history. Living monuments don't last forever,
but can give birth to ideals that may live a very long time. That
is not a tragedy by any means.
--
Oh, smell your harmonica. Go on, smell it son. - Johnny 'Guitar'
Watson
there is a large "shoot" presently growing from the old root system. new tree
MJ Emigh
2017-08-29 02:46:34 UTC
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Huh? Could you repeat that?
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