Discussion:
Anthropologist Margaret Zehmer Searcy, 90, in May
(too old to reply)
l***@yahoo.com
2017-08-30 00:44:42 UTC
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She lived in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/tuscaloosa/obituary.aspx?n=margaret-zehmer-searcy&pid=185747711

Excerpts:

...In 1946, at the age of 19, Margaret earned her Bachelor of Arts in Sociology from Duke University. In 1954, she became the first student to receive a Master of Arts in Anthropology from The University of Alabama. Her thesis was "Tuscaloosa County Hunting". Yes, it was Margaret who taught her husband, son and grandson, Jeph, to hunt. Well, not really, but like Margaret would have said, "It makes an entertaining story".
In 1963, she was hired to teach in the Department of Sociology and Anthropology at The University of Alabama. She was a founding member of the Department of Anthropology when it became a separate entity from the Sociology Department in 1967. She provided the first exposure to anthropology for thousands of students at Alabama. She retired in 1988 as emeritus faculty...

...Throughout her life she received many awards, including a faculty grant by The University of Alabama (1969), Alabama Consortium of Higher Education Award (1973), Charlton W. Tebeau Literary Award from Florida Historical Society (for Ikwa of the Temple Mounds), Alabama Author Award and Alabama Library Association Award (1980, for Tiny Bat and the Ball Game).
Margaret was very proud of her work, including U.S. Congressional testimony associated with the MOWA Band of Choctaw Indians. One of her most cherished honors was being officially adopted by the MOWA Choctaw tribe...



https://groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/rec.arts.books.childrens/searcy%7Csort:relevance/rec.arts.books.childrens/AHtz4ogynZ4/iHZEeQ_DBQAJ
(birthday post from 2016, with booklist)

Excerpt:

From the Pelican Publishing Company:

...Searcy's series for the intermediate reader is based upon extensive archaeological data and ethno-historic accounts. All of the details in Eyr the Hunter: A Story of Ice-Age America have been carefully researched. Searcy visited an archaeological site that had been occupied by a band society. She also studied Arctic animals and viewed the bones of the extinct giant animals that are depicted in the story. In addition, she read reports about more modern bands who hunted elephants (closely related to ancient mammoths) with spears.

Ikwa of the Mound-Builder Indians was dramatized on Alabama Public Television and aired numerous times as a part of the school curriculum. In 1976, Ikwa of the Mound-Builder Indians won the Charlton W. Tebeau Prize of the Florida Historical Society for the “best children's or young adults' book dealing with a Florida-related subject.” Pelican has reissued Ikwa and has released the companion volumes to this acclaimed book, Wolf Dog of the Woodland Indians and The Charm of the Bear Claw Necklace.

Her fact and fantasy series for the younger reader adapts Indian myths and legends to the problems of the multi-ethnic classroom, while teaching basic biology...




Lenona.
Steve Hayes
2017-08-30 03:34:55 UTC
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On Tue, 29 Aug 2017 17:44:42 -0700 (PDT), ***@yahoo.com wrote:

She lived in Tuscaloosa, Alabama.

http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/tuscaloosa/obituary.aspx?n=margaret-zehmer-searcy&pid=185747711

Excerpts:

...In 1946, at the age of 19, Margaret earned her Bachelor of Arts in
Sociology from Duke University. In 1954, she became the first student
to receive a Master of Arts in Anthropology from The University of
Alabama. Her thesis was "Tuscaloosa County Hunting". Yes, it was
Margaret who taught her husband, son and grandson, Jeph, to hunt.
Well, not really, but like Margaret would have said, "It makes an
entertaining story".
In 1963, she was hired to teach in the Department of Sociology and
Anthropology at The University of Alabama. She was a founding member
of the Department of Anthropology when it became a separate entity
from the Sociology Department in 1967. She provided the first exposure
to anthropology for thousands of students at Alabama. She retired in
1988 as emeritus faculty...

...Throughout her life she received many awards, including a faculty
grant by The University of Alabama (1969), Alabama Consortium of
Higher Education Award (1973), Charlton W. Tebeau Literary Award from
Florida Historical Society (for Ikwa of the Temple Mounds), Alabama
Author Award and Alabama Library Association Award (1980, for Tiny Bat
and the Ball Game).
Margaret was very proud of her work, including U.S. Congressional
testimony associated with the MOWA Band of Choctaw Indians. One of her
most cherished honors was being officially adopted by the MOWA Choctaw
tribe...



https://groups.google.com/forum/#!searchin/rec.arts.books.childrens/searcy%7Csort:relevance/rec.arts.books.childrens/AHtz4ogynZ4/iHZEeQ_DBQAJ
(birthday post from 2016, with booklist)

Excerpt:

From the Pelican Publishing Company:

...Searcy's series for the intermediate reader is based upon extensive
archaeological data and ethno-historic accounts. All of the details in
Eyr the Hunter: A Story of Ice-Age America have been carefully
researched. Searcy visited an archaeological site that had been
occupied by a band society. She also studied Arctic animals and viewed
the bones of the extinct giant animals that are depicted in the story.
In addition, she read reports about more modern bands who hunted
elephants (closely related to ancient mammoths) with spears.

Ikwa of the Mound-Builder Indians was dramatized on Alabama Public
Television and aired numerous times as a part of the school
curriculum. In 1976, Ikwa of the Mound-Builder Indians won the
Charlton W. Tebeau Prize of the Florida Historical Society for the
“best children's or young adults' book dealing with a Florida-related
subject.” Pelican has reissued Ikwa and has released the companion
volumes to this acclaimed book, Wolf Dog of the Woodland Indians and
The Charm of the Bear Claw Necklace.

Her fact and fantasy series for the younger reader adapts Indian myths
and legends to the problems of the multi-ethnic classroom, while
teaching basic biology...

Lenona.

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