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Disabled man drowns in Florida, teens watch and laugh
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l***@yahoo.com
2017-07-31 16:04:00 UTC
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I'm sure you heard.

http://www.refugees.bratfree.com/read.php?2,418075

One comment:

"This just turns my stomach. According to one article i read, only ONE of the parents the police spoke to even got visibly upset. Imagine being told your kid watched someone DIE and just whipped out the video camera and shouted insults.

"The only good part about them not being charged with a crime is that there is no reason to not reveal their names. Their names and faces should be plastered all over every newspaper, Facebook page and website. Considering they are obviously sociopaths, it would be a public safety measure. The local police are probably 100% sure they will be seeing them again."


And:

"They did find an obscure law that requires someone to report a death or finding a dead body, a class 1 misdemeanor. They are looking for more."


http://fox6now.com/2017/07/30/hundreds-fill-florida-church-for-funeral-for-disabled-man-who-drowned-while-teens-laughed/


And, from CNN:

...Dunn's family initially filed a missing person's report on July 12, three days after he had already drowned. His body was recovered from the water on July 14.
Police had initially said it could be difficult to charge the teens because Florida doesn't have a law that obligates a citizen to render aid or call for help for anyone in distress.
But they have since decided to use a Florida law, also know as the medical examiners statute, which says that it's the "duty of any person" to report a death.
"Typically it's used for people who work in nursing homes, hospitals and care givers. The statute itself is written under the guidelines for a medical examiner. We're hoping it applies here, as well," Martinez said.
She added that it "has never been used in this type of scenario before, but we're going to see if it sticks."
Florida Senator Debbie Mayfield is looking to introduce a "good Samaritan" law in the wake of the incident, according to her legislative assistant. The Republican is reviewing laws in place in states such as Minnesota, Rhode Island and Vermont, which already have laws on the books protecting people who do take action to help people in need...



Lenona.
Sarah Ehrett's Lesbian Love Interest
2017-08-01 01:18:16 UTC
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When I grew up, maybe the most famous words of the times were, "Ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country."

When is the last time we've heard of the citizen's responsibilities?

I think our younger generation is more tuned in with each other, more apathetic. But I worry about the future when I see concern for minorities and the disenfranchised labeled "political correctness".
c***@aol.com
2017-08-01 03:35:12 UTC
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You're fucking old. Those words would mean more if the speaker of them hadn't been fucking the mistresses of mobsters.
Anglo Saxon
2017-08-01 10:54:51 UTC
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Post by c***@aol.com
You're fucking old. Those words would mean more if the speaker of them
hadn't been fucking the mistresses of mobsters.

LOL. You're dark, but damned funny sometimes.
J.D. Baldwin
2017-08-02 13:52:39 UTC
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Post by l***@yahoo.com
"This just turns my stomach.
Mine, too. For completely different reasons.

Police had initially said it could be difficult to charge the
teens because Florida doesn't have a law that obligates a citizen
to render aid or call for help for anyone in distress. But they
have since decided to use a Florida law, also know as the medical
examiners statute, which says that it's the "duty of any person"
to report a death.

"Typically it's used for people who work in nursing homes,
hospitals and care givers. The statute itself is written under the
guidelines for a medical examiner. We're hoping it applies here,
as well," Martinez said. She added that it "has never been used
in this type of scenario before, but we're going to see if it
sticks."

This is abuse of the power of the state, which ought to concern
everyone more than a few human canker sores who didn't act with even
the most basic human decency. Society can (and does) survive a lot of
the latter; when the former runs unchecked, liberty ends. Twisting a
law whose intent and scope is crystal clear to apply to an entirely
different situation, just because we don't like the actors in the
situation, is sick and wrong.

When you can't find a law criminalizing behavior you don't like, you
drop the matter. You don't go digging deeper, squinting real REAL hard
at every statute until you find one into which you can shoehorn the
defendants. That's what you do in a society of laws, anyway.

Florida Senator Debbie Mayfield is looking to introduce a "good
Samaritan" law in the wake of the incident, according to her
legislative assistant.

Ms. Mayfield is either a moron or a panderer or both. Every U.S.
jurisdiction, including Florida[1], has a so-called "Good Samaritan"
law that protects people rendering aid from civil liability even if
they are negligent in rendering aid. And even if it weren't for that,
failing to render aid is not the subject of those laws. They are
solely about giving cover to people who might not want to get involved
because they fear being sued.

[1] Florida's GS law, by the way, is weak as hell and provides no
*real* cover to citizens responding to an emergency situation.
Maybe that should be strengthened, but it doesn't seem to be what
Mayfield is talking about.
--
_+_ From the catapult of |If anyone objects to any statement I make, I am
_|70|___:)=}- J.D. Baldwin |quite prepared not only to retract it, but also
\ / ***@panix.com|to deny under oath that I ever made it.-T. Lehrer
***~~~~----------------------------------------------------------------------
c***@aol.com
2017-08-02 15:55:02 UTC
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Let's legislate that people have to be decent. That'll turn out well.
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